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A movie you could never get tired of!


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The Quiet Man . I never get tired of seeing that .The Man who Shot Liberty Valance . The Goodbye Girl . there are more but I can't name them all have a nice day always happy to reply to your questions

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no matter how many times i see the opening musical number to "road to morroco" (1944), i still have to laugh. the desert scene is great where all three (lamour, hope, crosby) switch voices.

also, in "every girl should be married" (1949), i never get tired of the ending. after so much chasing, Betsy Drake finally gets what she's after.

 

bhf

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I can and have watched 'People Will Talk' many, many times. Cary Grant is at his charming best in some spots, comedic at others, and romantic at others, as well as exasperated in several areas.

 

Also, are the two best 'chick flicks' ever made, 'Steel Magnolias', and 'A Love Affair to Remember', (Grant/Kerr version, the others don't hold a candle to it). And when I want a laugh as well as a little fright its 'The Uninvited.'

. . . . . . . . . . . . ;-) . . . .

 

Anne

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Also, are the two best 'chick flicks' ever made, 'Steel Magnolias', >>

 

Anne,

 

First time I was watching SM, I was so taken with the chemistry between the characters of Dolly Parton and Sam Shepard that by the end of the movie, I wanted to see

their story more than the movie I watched.

 

Felt that way at the end of the "The Client" (should have said "The Firm" see above where Anne caught my mistake)with the scene between Holly Hunter and David Strathern. Really wanted to see the movie about their characters more than the movie I got.

 

Don't you hate when that happens. :)

 

It's good to see so many of us digging in and waiting for the 'heat fever" to break.

 

Message was edited by:

lzcutter due to being tired

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Despite her outrageous form and hair, if you can overlook those things, Dolly is a pretty darn good actress, she doesn't make many movies, but as each one came along, she got better. Shortly before SM, she did 'Straight Talk' with James Woods, and he looked like the beginner in that one, she was as relaxed and into the part as you could want for such crappy material to work with. But, I love Dolly and could listen to her all day. Talk about a hard life. She had it, but something like 75% of the employees at Dollywood are relatives of hers. They love her in Tennessee.

 

As for 'the Client' I know Susan Sarandon was the lawyer, the mother was someone who was around for a while, then disappeared, and Tommy Lee Jones was the tough cop (right?), but I don't recall Holy Hunter and David Straithern. . . refresh me.

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Anne,

 

You're right, my bad. I am tired from moving today and watched again "The Client" two months back with my mom.

 

I meant to say "The Firm". Thanks for catching that.

 

As for Dollywood, Debbie Reynolds may be moving her Hollywood Memorabilia Museum there.

 

I hope we haven't hijacked this thread as that wasn't my intent. :0

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>

> You're right, my bad. I am tired from moving today

>

LzCutter:

 

You must be tired, what the heck is 'my bad?!!!

Anyway, For some reason today, watching 'Gunga Din' of all things, I thought of two movies, I'm surprised they haven't on either of the stars days. They must be from another studio. If you need to take a rest, you might want to run out and see if they are rentable. I have them on tape so I don't know. Mine are from the early AMC days with no commercials.

 

1. To Each His Own. - Olivia DeHaviland

1946 - Best Actress - Great tearjerker with a semi-happy ending.

 

2. Good Morning Miss Dove - Jennifer Jones

No awards I know of, but really good 'generations' movie about a teacher

in a small town and the kids she taught as they grow up.

 

They are both 'feel good' movies and I'm sure you would like them, the acting is excellent in both.

 

Anne

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"You must be tired, what the heck is 'my bad?!!!"

 

Get hep to the jive, Mrs. L! "My bad" is in the parlance of today's youth. It stands for the admittance of guilt: "Am I bad!". It's kind of a coy, embarrassed apology. Solid Jackson!

 

:D

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Larry, you are so right about this movie. It's packed for laughs from beginning to end and my favorite scene is when Meryl Streep's character falls down the stairs. I can't get enough of seeing her unwind herself with the head backwards and saying "Earnest, you pushed me down the stairs!".

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mrsl, I think 'my bad' is one of the pet peeves of someone here, as a matter of fact!

 

My bad is the new lingo for what is, in effect, "I'm sorry, I have committed a faux paux, will you be so kind as to forgive me, thank you very much'.

 

As with 'yo' and 'duh', 'my bad' is a shorthand way of communicating the above.

 

Um, like, you know, do you get it?

 

:)

 

dolores

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Okay, okay Jack:

 

My apologies lzcutter. I'm still working on 'Hey' and 'Yo' for hello. Living in 'antique-land, Tinley Park, IL, I don't have a lot of access to teenagers, and my 12 yr. old grandson is always cutting lawns. So, Papa Jack, where do you get your knowledge of 'the parlance of today's youth'?

 

P.S. I'm sorry Meryl and Goldie wasted their talents on 'Death Becomes Her', I thought it was awful, I even watched it with a glass of wine to see if that helped, but in my case it didn't. I'm afraid my type of slapstick is Lucy and LaVerne and Shirley.

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A Tale of Two Cities(1935): Dickens story gets the Thalberg/Selznick gloss, myriad brilliant character actors, from Edna May Oliver to Walter Catlett get to strut their stuff, and, *sigh*, we get Ronald Colman, moustacheless, for once, in the role of Sidney Carton, which he was born to play. Oh, yes, and the audience gets a highly entertaining view of a revolution at a healthy reserve. Moving and beguiling for every minute.

 

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir(1947): A supernatural comic love story with Rex Harrison, Gene Tierney, George Sanders et al, and that divine Bernard Herrmann score, along with sublime cinematography of Charles Lang---all directed seamlessly in his apprenticeship days as director by Joseph Mankiewicz. That formula equals a movie experience as satisfying and as much of a restoration of the spirit as any film I've ever seen.

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Okay, okay Jack:

 

My apologies lzcutter. I'm still working on 'Hey' and 'Yo' for hello. Living in 'antique-land, Tinley Park, IL, I don't have a lot of access to teenagers, and my 12 yr. old grandson is always cutting lawns. So, Papa Jack, where do you get your knowledge of 'the parlance of today's youth'?

 

P.S. I'm sorry Meryl and Goldie wasted their talents on 'Death Becomes Her', I thought it was awful, I even watched it with a glass of wine to see if that helped, but in my case it didn't. I'm afraid my type of slapstick is Lucy and LaVerne and Shirley.

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Sorry Folks,

 

I usually get dropped, this time I was printed twice. Hello!

 

Thank all of you fine people for filling me in on today's 'Queen's English', I had no idea I was so far behind times - I need a guide book.

 

Thank you, Anne ;-)

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Funny that you should mention Ronald Colman, songbird, because one of the first movies that came to mind that I don't think I've ever minded seeing repeatedly is If I Were King(1938) starring Colman as Francois Villon, Basil Rathbone as King Louis XI, and Frances Dee and Ellen Drew as Villon's noble and peasant loves, respectively. This film also includes a beautifully recreated world of medieval Paris with a wonderful, slightly mocking script by Preston Sturges. They do not make them like that anymore.

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SAN FRANCISCO -- Top notch entertainment all the way!

 

PRISONER OF ZENDA - Ronald Colman is terrific! Great supporting cast, wonderful score! I ADORE RC!!!

 

NIGHT AT THE OPERA - Classic Marxian mayhem -- with "cultural" overtones. What the Marxes do to "Il Trovatore" is still hysterical after all these years.

 

MAYTIME - Glorious film with great music of all kinds. Jeanette MacDonald gives a sparkling/touching performance as a reclusive, retired singer recounting her tragic love affair with another singer.

 

THE QUIET MAN - An utter delight from beginning to end. Wow -- Maureen O'Hara is a sight for sore eyes -- plus the gorgeous scenery and musical score.

 

THE SEARCH - One of my all time faves -- everyone shines in this film. I've lost track of how many times I've seen it -- but it doesn't grow old with time.

 

LOVE AFFAIR - Irene Dunne and Charles Boyer. Pure movie magic! It is timeless. What "romance" is really about!

 

GHOSTBUSTERS -- Completely nutzo, yet somehow endearing. One of the very few "modern" films I can watch again and again.

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