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The Supernatural and the Spiritual


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I adore Bruce Willis, but I have not seen "The Sixth Sense".  I really need to make a point of watching it.  

 

 

 

I guess it's not possible, after all these years, Eugenia, that you don't know the twist ending of The Sixth Sense.

 

But if, by chance, you don't know the ending, please stick your fingers in your ears right now and don't remove them until you see the film. And should you see the lips of someone ask you why your fingers are in your ears, just tell them they're stuck.

 

Believe me, no matter what kind of weird looks you get (maybe really weird, I admit), it will be well worth it for you if you don't know the film's surprise ending in advance. And forget all those posters here who said they guessed it half way through. Believe me, they didn't.

 

At least I'm being totally honest with you when I say I couldn't see the ending coming.

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Here's a title that makes me slap my forehead (as in, "Why didn't I think of this one"?)  ...The Shining.

 

I probably don't have to write a complete synopsis for most regular posters here, but briefly, a family spends a winter at a hotel where a ghost incites the writer father into deranged behavior, and the writer's son has a lot of psychic premonitions.  The legendary Jack Nicholson stars in this all-time classic.  If you feel like losing a night's sleep, or need a reason to reach for the nearest teddy bear, run, don't walk, to watch this movie!

 

A lot of people didn't care for The Shining, and while its reputation has grown since its release, its still not critically liked. A lot of my friends, too, feel that it's boring. And some fans of the book (including the author himself, Stephen King) don't like the movie, and feel that the book's point was lost in the film. I haven't read the book, mainly because I love the film so much, and some differences, like the hedge maze from the film not being in the book, and instead there are hedge animals that come to life, seem to make the book the inferior product. 

 

The Shining is my favorite horror film, and one of my favorite films period. It is one of the few films to genuinely creep me out, as opposed to cheap jump scares or sloppy gore scenes. Something about the lighting scheme makes it scarier to me, since instead of things being half seen in shadowy darkness, everything is brightly lit, so when the supernatural occurs, it upsets the heightened sense of reality. 

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I guess it's not possible, after all these years, Eugenia, that you don't know the twist ending of The Sixth Sense.

 

But if, by chance, you don't know the ending, please stick your fingers in your ears right now and don't remove them until you see the film. And should you see the lips of someone ask you why your fingers are in your ears, just tell them they're stuck.

 

Believe me, no matter what kind of weird looks you get (maybe really weird, I admit), it will be well worth it for you if you don't know the film's surprise ending in advance. And forget all those posters here who said they guessed it half way through. They're just trying to impress us. Believe me, they didn't guess it.

 

At least I'm being totally honest with you when I say I couldn't see the ending coming.

 

I'm sure I read or heard the ending at some point, but luckily in this case my memory's faltered.  :)

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I guess it's not possible, after all these years, Eugenia, that you don't know the twist ending of The Sixth Sense.

 

But if, by chance, you don't know the ending, please stick your fingers in your ears right now and don't remove them until you see the film. And should you see the lips of someone ask you why your fingers are in your ears, just tell them they're stuck.

 

Believe me, no matter what kind of weird looks you get (maybe really weird, I admit), it will be well worth it for you if you don't know the film's surprise ending in advance. And forget all those posters here who said they guessed it half way through. Believe me, they didn't.

 

At least I'm being totally honest with you when I say I couldn't see the ending coming.

The reason I saw the ending coming is because I am a bit too familiar with the genre.  I.e, I can guess where film noir is heading...

 

There are indeed movies I saw for the first time where I did NOT see the ending coming - these aren't part of the thread title genre but:

 

Zorba the Greek

Stalag 17

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolfe

Easy Rider in terms of *why* the people who are killed in the film were killed.  Silly me, I  thought that it was a movie about drug overdoses

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A lot of people didn't care for The Shining, and while its reputation has grown since its release, its still not critically liked. A lot of my friends, too, feel that it's boring. And some fans of the book (including the author himself, Stephen King) don't like the movie, and feel that the book's point was lost in the film. I haven't read the book, mainly because I love the film so much, and some differences, like the hedge maze from the film not being in the book, and instead there are hedge animals that come to life, seem to make the book the inferior product. 

 

The Shining is my favorite horror film, and one of my favorite films period. It is one of the few films to genuinely creep me out, as opposed to cheap jump scares or sloppy gore scenes. Something about the lighting scheme makes it scarier to me, since instead of things being half seen in shadowy darkness, everything is brightly lit, so when the supernatural occurs, it upsets the heightened sense of reality. 

I have not read the book and for much of the same reason.  I enjoy the film.  I know King does not like it.  But my interest in the film as a lot to do with Jack Nicholson.

 

I think that my favourite horror film, if I were to rank them - and keep in mind that I am not a fan of horror films -would be Frankenstein  for the movies made with monsters, and The Innocents, for movies made about ghosts.

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The reason I saw the ending coming [ in THE SIXTH SENSE]is because I am a bit too familiar with the genre. I.e, I can guess where film noir is heading...

I wish I could remember the specifics, but the exact moment where I figured it out had something to do with a red doorknob or light bulb... it's a pretty clear clue.

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The reason I saw the ending coming is because I am a bit too familiar with the genre.  I.e, I can guess where film noir is heading...

 

 

I didn't guess the twist in The Sixth Sense until the last ten minutes or so of the film, but one big reason was that I didn't know there was a twist. I think "the twist" has become an albatross around M. Night's neck, since everyone keeps expecting it again, and he keeps trying to provide one, but they can never have the same impact if we're ready for it ahead of time.

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I didn't guess the twist in The Sixth Sense until the last ten minutes or so of the film, but one big reason was that I didn't know there was a twist. I think "the twist" has become an albatross around M. Night's neck, since everyone keeps expecting it again, and he keeps trying to provide one, but they can never have the same impact if we're ready for it ahead of time.

That is what I meant when I said that I am familiar with a genre like film noir.  I am familiar with the director.

 

I think the twist he did in the television was really not that original.

 

It is like - where shall we hide in this  horror movie - I know:

 

Let's hide in the tool shed.

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A lot of people didn't care for The Shining...  A lot of my friends, too, feel that it's boring.

 

Interesting to read, Lawrence.  Can I ask why?  Do they feel it's 'dated' in terms of technical theatrics?  Or is it the storyline?

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I didn't guess the twist in The Sixth Sense until the last ten minutes or so of the film, but one big reason was that I didn't know there was a twist.

 

Now that I think about it, I don't think I knew there was a twist at the end of the Sixth Sense either. I was just watching the film, having heard that it was good. That may be the real I was so surprised by the ending.

 

I love a director that can cleverly manipulate the viewer (without cheating in his presentation).

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Interesting to read, Lawrence.  Can I ask why?  Do they feel it's 'dated' in terms of technical theatrics?  Or is it the storyline?

 

They said it was too long (which it is a good 40 minutes longer than most horror films), not much happens, the ending is vague in many ways. I think they're just used to typical slasher-style horror films that don't require much thought. It's much slower paced and almost brooding compared to most modern quick-edit films. Needless to say, they are not film buffs the way I am. And it's not all of my friends either. There are a couple who love it.

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Cocteau has a certain way with what I would call

the other worldly, and managed to avoid many of

the cliches of that place. I think he induces wonder

rather than fright.

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Rosemary's Baby is a film that has grown on me over time. I didn't much care for it the first time around, as I found Mia Farrow insufferable and the story was very basic. I always thought of it as a supernatural horror film for people who don't like supernatural horror films. The performances by the supporting cast, from Ruth Gordon to Ralph Bellamy and Charles Grodin and Sidney Blackmer and Maurice Evans, are all terrific. Cassavetes doesn't really bring much to his role, although to be fair, the role doesn't call for a lot. And it "legitimized" horror films for the next decade, and lead to other A list horrors like The Exorcist and The Omen.

In the story Mia's character is tiresome, but it is a very scary story. I thought so when I was in high

school and still do. Not to spoil it for anyone who has not seen it, I like the way they built up and

enlarged upon certain clues that led to the frightening denouement of the film. Later I found the book

at the library written skilfully by Ira Levin. There are tiresome parts where they get away with

a few things that would not have been possible before.

This said, I think the film is worth a try in other respects of originality and respect The all star cast is

really fantastic with Maurice Evans and Ruth Gordon, etc.

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Interesting to read, Lawrence.  Can I ask why?  Do they feel [THE SHINING] 'dated' in terms of technical theatrics?  Or is it the storyline?

 

I'll expound on this somewhat if you don' mind, although (and Miss Wonderly will back me up on this) every time Kubrick enters the conversation, things escalate and we're at each other's throats before you can say "Redrum."

 

I do not like Stephen King, I think he is the hackiest hack who ever hacked, and I am amazed to think of all the incredibly talented people out there who just cannot bring themselves to commit their thoughts to the page because of crippling self doubt, yet this glue-sniffing moron never had a Nyquil-induced fever dream he didn't feel the need to commit to a thousand pages or turn into a screenplay.

 

that said, THE SHINING is one of the verrrry few books of his that has any nuance, anything going on deeper beneath the surface than just a book about a killer car or killer machines or killer clowns who live in the sewer and turn out to be space aliens**. to me, its a book about ALCOHOLISM and how ADDICTION can haunt even the best of us and bring forth monsters far more horrific than any imagined ghost or boogeyman.

 

the ghosts in the hotel are a metaphor for Jack Torrance's alcoholic demons, hes actually a good guy, he doesn't want to lose his mind and kill his family, he struggles and fights these desires.

 

all this is gone in the movie. there's literally no transition scene from Jack being normal to a sudden tight close-up of him staring out the window, clearly in full psycho mode. that's all the development we get. he seems like a real jerk from the beginning, there is no struggle.

 

in short, it boggles my mind that there was ACTUALLY NUANCE TO BE EXPLORED IN A STEPHEN KING NOVEL, and Kubrick just foregoes it because, as usual, he's too busy falling madly in love with all his light and camera tricks.

 

Now, let the brawls begin.

 

 

**I'm not kidding. That's seriously the plot of IT.

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I'll expound on this somewhat if you don' mind, although (and Miss Wonderly will back me up on this) every time Kubrick enters the conversation, things escalate and we're at each other's throats before you can say "Redrum."

 

I do not like Stephen King, I think he is the hackiest hack who ever hacked, and I am amazed to think of all the incredibly talented people out there who just cannot bring themselves to commit their thoughts to the page because of crippling self doubt, yet this glue-sniffing moron never had a Nyquil-induced fever dream he didn't feel the need to commit to a thousand pages or turn into a screenplay.

 

that said, THE SHINING is one of the verrrry few books of his that has any nuance, anything going on deeper beneath the surface than just a book about a killer car or killer machines or killer clowns who live in the sewer and turn out to be space aliens**. to me, its a book about ALCOHOLISM and how ADDICTION can haunt even the best of us and bring forth monsters far more horrific than any imagined ghost or boogeyman.

 

the ghosts in the hotel are a metaphor for Jack Torrance's alcoholic demons, hes actually a good guy, he doesn't want to lose his mind and kill his family, he struggles and fights these desires.

 

all this is gone in the movie. there's literally no transition scene from Jack being normal to a sudden tight close-up of him staring out the window, clearly in full psycho mode. that's all the development we get. he seems like a real jerk from the beginning, there is no struggle.

 

in short, it boggles my mind that there was ACTUALLY NUANCE TO BE EXPLORED IN A STEPHEN KING NOVEL, and Kubrick just foregoes it because, as usual, he's too busy falling madly in love with all his light and camera tricks.

 

Now, let the brawls begin.

 

 

**I'm not kidding. That's seriously the plot of IT.

I am not  a King fan either.  I don't read his books.  I think that I love The Shining because of Jack Nicholson.

 

As for Stanley Kubrick - it really depends upon the movie for me.  Some I love.  Some I hate. Some I tolerate.  Others I have never attempted to watch and I don't want to try (can you say Full Metal Jacket and Eyes Wide Shut?)

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I am not  a King fan either.  I don't read his books.  I think that I love The Shining because of Jack Nicholson.

 

As for Stanley Kubrick - it really depends upon the movie for me.  Some I love.  Some I hate. Some I tolerate.  Others I have never attempted to watch and I don't want to try (can you say Full Metal Jacket and Eyes Wide Shut?)

 

actually, FULL METAL JACKET is pretty good, although it's been a loooooooooooong time since I saw it. PATHS OF GLORY is also excellent.

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THE SHINING is one of the verrrry few books of his that has any nuance, anything going on deeper beneath the surface than just a book about a killer car or killer machines or killer clowns who live in the sewer and turn out to be space aliens. 

 

Couldn't agree with you more on the above.

 

I hear what you're saying with some of the book's details being lost on screen, but for me it doesn't matter.  No doubt Kubrick had movie time constraints, although yeah, maybe he cut in the wrong places.  I still think The Shining is a great flick. :)

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actually, FULL METAL JACKET is pretty good, although it's been a loooooooooooong time since I saw it. PATHS OF GLORY is also excellent.

I adore Paths of Glory.  It is one of my favourite anti-war films of all time.

 

I also love Dr.Strangelove, although it is less satire than before.

 

I will keep Full Metal Jacket in mind.  I have seen some violent war movies like Apocalyspe Now because I am a fan of the star of the movie (In A.N., it is Martin Sheen).

 

 

hmmm.  I never spell Apocolypse correctly.....you get the idea..

 

 

Edit: I am looking at my DVD cover for Apocalypse Now Redux.  So I can spell it. Sigh.  What I buy because I love martin Sheen and he nearly died making it...

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The Shining was remade later as a TV mini-series, adapted by King himself and directed by one of his buddies. He made it to address all of those complaints with Kubrick's film and make it faithful to the book. Did you see it? It was crap. 

 

Like I said earlier, many people don't like the Kubrick film (and they are usually very vocal about it), but I liked it, and it's leagues better than the more faithful mini-series.

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Couldn't agree with you more on the above.

 

I hear what you're saying with some of the book's details being lost on screen, but for me it doesn't matter.  No doubt Kubrick had movie time constraints, although yeah, maybe he cut in the wrong places.  I still think The Shining is a great flick. :)

 

well, it's by no means a "bad flick", but it could be even better!

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The Shining was remade later as a TV mini-series, adapted by King himself and directed by one of his buddies. He made it to address all of those complaints with Kubrick's film and make it faithful to the book. Did you see it? It was crap. 

 

Like I said earlier, many people don't like the Kubrick film (and they are usually very vocal about it), but I liked it, and it's leagues better than the more faithful mini-series.

 

yeah, it was like six hours long and the guy from the TV Show WINGS played the Nicholson role...and didn't really carry it well.

 

Rebecca DeMornay- who I've always liked although she might not be the greatest actress, she just looks like A MOVIE STAR to me- played Wendy (the wife), which was apparently at King's suggestion.

 

Not sure this was a wise decision. A snowbound man trapped for months with Shelley Duvall has every reason to go completely insane (wouldn't we all?) but being trapped for months with Rebecca DeMornay???!!!!

 

Hell, I'm gay as  a picnic basket, and even I could learn to adapt to that!

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i went to see THE SIXTH SENSE with my parents in the theater in 1999. I knew going in there was supposed to be a "twist"; i figured it out halfway through and leaned over to both my parents and told them.

 

i like ruining things for people.

 

 

You didn't ! ! ??  How horrible of you ! 

I suppose, if you hadn't seen it before and it was a first time viewing for you as well as your parents, one could argue that it wasn't a true spoiler because you were just guessing.

 

But in general, I hate spoilers and I hate it when people commit spoilage on a film.

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He spent a lot of time making that television series tarring Matt Dillon who was very standoffish compared to his stand in.  A lot of the series was filmed near where I lived and I have to say, the director walked by me several times and I had no interest in trying to meet him.  I was supposed to be an extra in the pilot episode and a lot was filmed  in the scenes where I was supposed to be walking down the street.  When I saw the pilot episode and the extremely brief and in the far distance from the camera any extras could be seen, I was glad that I had not been available to do further episodes.

 

I did watch the first half of the series.  But then I got bored with it half way through, because again, this is the problem with that director.

 

 

I guessed The Sixth Sense ending part way through just like with The Others.

 

 

Signs was okay.

 

 

What series? What "television series" are you talking about?  You do that a lot, talk about a film or show or whatever without naming it.  You shouldn't assume that we all always know whatever it is you're referring to at any given time.

 

Wouldn't it make sense, if you 're making the effort to post about it on the boards anyway, to take an extra few seconds and name whatever movie or show you're talking about? To just say "that show that he directed with Matt Dillon", as though everyone here knows what it is, is kind of annoying.

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You didn't ! ! ?? How horrible of you !

I suppose, if you hadn't seen it before and it was a first time viewing for you as well as your parents, one could argue that it wasn't a true spoiler because you were just guessing.

 

But in general, I hate spoilers and I hate it when people commit spoilage on a film.

There are those who think that because a film is "old," then you cannot really spoil it. However, if you know a person wants to watch or is going to watch a specific film, then it's crappy to spoil it.

 

Not that this is an old film, but my friend spoiled the latest Star Wars movie for me by telling me about Han Solo. I'm not a big Star Wars fanatic, but it was still lame.

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