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The Supernatural and the Spiritual


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Cocteau has a certain way with what I would call

the other worldly, and managed to avoid many of

the cliches of that place. I think he induces wonder

rather than fright.

 

What are you thinking of in particular, other than La Belle et La Bete ? (which certainly qualifies as "other wordly".)

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Let me see if I can get this thread back on track, away from war films.

 

One film I don't think has been mentioned, is DEATH TAKES A HOLIDAY. Although I have it recorded, it's been ages since I've seen it. Not sure if TCM has shown it recently (or ever); it may have been since the good old days of AMC since I've last seen it.

 

Anyway, this film.is unusual, stagey yet chilling. The dark blotch on the screen is actually unnerving, despite the dialogue making it a.rather static talkfest. Interesting film.and.concept.

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Let me see if I can get this thread back on track, away from war films.

 

One film I don't think has been mentioned, is DEATH TAKES A HOLIDAY. Although I have it recorded, it's been ages since I've seen it. Not sure if TCM has shown it recently (or ever); it may have been since the good old days of AMC since I've last seen it.

 

Anyway, this film.is unusual, stagey yet chilling. The dark blotch on the screen is actually unnerving, despite the dialogue making it a.rather static talkfest. Interesting film.and.concept.

 

And it was the inspiration for the Brad Pitt film Meet Joe Black.  The original was 79 minutes, and the Pitt version was 181 minutes.  :huh:

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I also like films that have vague supernatural qualities, so that in some cases it's up to the audience to decide if things were mystical or not. I'm thinking at the moment of High Plains Drifter, where Clint Eastwood's character may or may not be a vengeful spirit. There are other examples, but they escape me. 

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What are you thinking of in particular, other than La Belle et La Bete ? (which certainly qualifies as "other wordly".)

Orpheus. That whole architecture and interconnection

between the two worlds of life and death and maybe a

gray area in between the two. Then there is the whole

post World War Two cafe poets setting and some wonder

ful visual tricks. It all adds up to a very exceptional experience

that is more impressive than the usual ghost stories. I still

enjoy that radio message L'oiseau chant avec ses doigts.

every time I watch it.

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What series? What "television series" are you talking about?  You do that a lot, talk about a film or show or whatever without naming it.  You shouldn't assume that we all always know whatever it is you're referring to at any given time.

 

Wouldn't it make sense, if you 're making the effort to post about it on the boards anyway, to take an extra few seconds and name whatever movie or show you're talking about? To just say "that show that he directed with Matt Dillon", as though everyone here knows what it is, is kind of annoying.

Well, that shows how few people actually saw the show.

 

I was talking about Wayward Pines.

 

I was in the pilot episode originally just walking down the street and eating at an ice cream shop- this was all in Agassiz -, but there was this flower shop and the flower girl did not know it was going to be an all-day shoot and had childcare only until 3pm.  So she had to go home.

 

Meanwhile, Matt Dillon had to keep filming the same scene past us so the visuals did nit match.

 

That was in August 2013.

 

They came back in October to shoot more scenes, but I did not go anymore.

 

Meanwhile, it was put on the shelf for I do not know how long until it was finally released - I saw the pilot episode and there was only a brief shot of  someone I remember seeing looking straight at the camera.

 

I watched a few episodes but people kept getting killed off in weird ways.

 

I remember being told that apparently, everyone in town had lobotomies. That is why everyone was living in the past.

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I remember being told that apparently, everyone in town had lobotomies. That is why everyone was living in the past.

 

**Spoilers** The story ended up being that the town leader, played by Toby Jones, had foreseen an apocalyptic event coming, so he created a massive storage facility that held supplies and enough people held in suspended animation to rebuild society some point in the distant future when the world was livable again. All of the footage in the mysterious town where Matt Dillon wakes up is actually 2000 years in the future, and the town is a mockup of an old town to help acclimate the newly awakened. The leader keeps everyone in the dark because they are the second batch of people that have been awakened. The first batch were immediately told about their whereabouts and the destruction of the outside world, and they went crazy and killed each other. So those in charge try to keep the new townsfolk from learning the truth. They eventually do, and the cannibalistic mutants that live outside of the town's walls break in, and everyone is in peril, but they find sanctuary at the end, although Dillon sacrifices himself to save everyone. The next season is supposed to follow this group as they try to live in the new world, and they also have a problem with children that have been raised in this new world being fascists. It's rather dopey.

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**Spoilers** The story ended up being that the town leader, played by Toby Jones, had foreseen an apocalyptic event coming, so he created a massive storage facility that held supplies and enough people held in suspended animation to rebuild society some point in the distant future when the world was livable again. All of the footage in the mysterious town where Matt Dillon wakes up is actually 2000 years in the future, and the town is a mockup of an old town to help acclimate the newly awakened. The leader keeps everyone in the dark because they are the second batch of people that have been awakened. The first batch were immediately told about their whereabouts and the destruction of the outside world, and they went crazy and killed each other. So those in charge try to keep the new townsfolk from learning the truth. They eventually do, and the mutated cannibalistic mutants that live outside of the town's walls break in, and everyone is in peril, but they find sanctuary at the end, although Dillon sacrifices himself to save everyone. The next season is supposed to follow this group as they try to live in the new world, and they also have a problem with children that have been raised in this new world being fascists. It's rather dopey.

 

Thanks, Lawrence for explaining what the ending of the season was. You mean there will be another season?

I tried really hard to watch the whole season of Wayward Pines because I live near Agassiz and I was on set and wanted to see it through because of this.  But after a few episodes, I could not get through it.

 

I actually got sick to my stomach watching it.

 

If I had continued being an extra on that show, I do not know what I would have done with all that gross and dopey stuff going on.

 

I prefer the stage where everything is done chronologically.

 

Even if things get screwed up in a live production it has to keep going on.

 

 

 

When I was in a production of The Wizard of Oz - and this was in 1998 - we never actually got through the whole show in one evening until opening night.  Everything would come to a standstill while people decided how to do the tornado scene.

 

We had a good opening night, but really, that was a close call.

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Here's another made-for-television movie dealing with the supernatural:

 

     SHE WAITS (1971-Tvm)  Run time:  74 minutes.  D:  Delbert Mann.  Starring Patty Duke Astin, David McCallum, James Callahan, Lew Ayres, Dorothy McGuire, Beulah Bondi.

 

     David McCallum has married Patty Duke.  She's his 2nd wife.  His first wife died mysteriously.  And her spirit does not wish to stay quiet!

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McCannady said: In the story Mia's character is tiresome, but it is a very scary story. 

 

But the entire idea of "this alien being growing inside your body" is a primal fear. The actress HAD to look & act helpless.

 

I find Rosemary to be "weak"at first, but then gain strength & knowledge as her pregnancy & clues reveal themselves. Her charactor is very much like Shelly Duval's "Wendy" charactor from the SHINING. 

 

At first I disliked the way Duvall portrayed Wendy, but subsequent viewings made me realize it was played just perfectly for the audience to sympathise with her.

 

Lorna said: I do not like Stephen King, I think he is the hackiest hack who ever hacked

 

Ouch!

I can understand not liking King's subject matter, I often find the sensationalism aspect tiring and cheap, but whoo-boy as a WRITER, he is the Hemingway of our time.

And by that I mean his craft: sentence structure, overall flow, charactor development, brilliance of words & phrases chosen are just stellar.

One of my favorite books of his was called "On Writing" where he explains how he writes his stories, it's like a school text book.

 

Really, King's GOT to be a technically excellent writer....how else could he interest the populous in the crazy dumbness of killer cars or pet zombies?

 

Ugh I just missed this past weekends Salt City Horror Fest of 14 hours of 35mm movies screened at the vintage theater in my neighborhood. They screened BOTH the SHINING & ROSEMARY'S BABY!! 

 

(I saw THE SHINING on the big screen when it first came out, but ROSEMARY'S BABY only on DVD. I bet it was great, that imagery..."THAT WAS NO DREAM!")

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How about PICTURE MOMMY DEAD, a movie I fondly, but vaguely, remember watching as a kid. A girl may be haunted by the vision of her mother burning and dying in a fire; she is now a teenager, having spent several years in an asylum. My siblings and cousins and I would love to sing the little jingle:

 

The worms crawl in, the worms crawl out,

In your stomach.and out your mouth

If you see a hearse go by

You may think that you will die.

 

I don't know who played the girl, but Don Ameche, Zsa Zsa Gabor, and Martha Hyer played her father, mother and step-mother respectively.

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I tend to not tell people when I am watching with them any spoilers unless asked for (such as in The Yearling which is sad). 

 

The Blair Witch Project was mentioned by someone earlier in this thread.  I never tried to watch it. 

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The Blair Witch Project was mentioned by someone earlier in this thread.  I never tried to watch it. 

Although I do like the film, I'd suggest you forego a viewing if you suffer from bouts of vertigo or motion sickness..  ;)

 

Sepiatone

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Earlier in this thread I made reference to the effectiveness of the horror scenes in Bob Hope's The Ghost Breakers. Parts of this film scared the dickens out of me when I was a kid (and I didn't even know I had one hiding inside me), and I still think they play extremely well when viewing the film today.

 

A handsome "A" production, with impressive sets and beautifully photographed by master cinematographer Charles Lang, the scenes set at the "haunted" castle on Black Island will give most viewers the chills, I suspect, no matter how familiar the dark house thriller aspect of the film may be.

 

I've got a couple of stills here to give you an indication of the effectiveness of the moody atmosphere of evil established in this production. Unfortunately, what you can't hear is the eerie musical score of Ernst Toch which accompanied these shots.

 

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Horror highlight of the film comes when heroine Paulette Goddard, scared as she finds herself alone in the castle, turns to leave it - only to be encountered by an ominous form walking towards her in the dark - a zombie.

 

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Although I do like the film, I'd suggest you forego a viewing if you suffer from bouts of vertigo or motion sickness..  ;)

 

Sepiatone

 

Sepia, did you grow up in a largely urban or rural area? I ask this, because almost everyone I've met who likes Blair Witch, or I should say was scared or creeped out by it, have been people who are used to an urban environment. Whereas I and my other friends who grew up in and around the woods found it sorely lacking. I think part of the film's power was tapping into a lot of people's dread (subconscious perhaps) of being lost in the woods, which is a fear I never cultivated.

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Sepia, did you grow up in a largely urban or rural area? I ask this, because almost everyone I've met who likes Blair Witch, or I should say was scared or creeped out by it, have been people who are used to an urban environment. Whereas I and my other friends who grew up in and around the woods found it sorely lacking. I think part of the film's power was tapping into a lot of people's dread (subconscious perhaps) of being lost in the woods, which is a fear I never cultivated.

 

The film also had the power to freak out those afraid that the contents of a dripping nostril might land on them.

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Sepia, did you grow up in a largely urban or rural area? I ask this, because almost everyone I've met who likes Blair Witch, or I should say was scared or creeped out by it, have been people who are used to an urban environment. Whereas I and my other friends who grew up in and around the woods found it sorely lacking. I think part of the film's power was tapping into a lot of people's dread (subconscious perhaps) of being lost in the woods, which is a fear I never cultivated.

 

Yeah, I have to throw in that I watched BLAIR WITCH on TV  a year or so after it came out, and in what is a very rare outcome for me, I went into it fully expecting to hate it HARD, and actually I liked it, a lot. The ending, I will add, scared me as much as any movie ever has...which is saying something, because I do not tend to get scared by movies.

 

(real life is another story...)

 

I also thought the actors were extremely effective, quite surprised NONE of them (I think) went on to have any acting careers at all.

 

ps- have spent a very fair share of time in rural areas and woods myself.

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Yeah, I have to throw in that I watched BLAIR WITCH on TV  a year or so after it came out, and in what is a very rare outcome for me, I went into it fully expecting to hate it HARD, and actually I liked it, a lot. The ending, I will add, scared me as much as any movie ever has...which is saying something, because I do not tend to get scared by movies.

 

(real life is another story...)

 

I also thought the actors were extremely effective, quite surprised NONE of them (I think) went on to have any acting careers at all.

 

ps- have spent a very fair share of time in rural areas and woods myself.

 

A lady friend of mine was so terrified by Blair Witch that she literally had trouble sleeping for a couple of nights afterward. Totally baffled me. But she was born and raised in Queens, NY, so the woods were largely an alien realm to her. To me it was 3 annoying idiots screaming and crying while they wandered around the woods for an hour. 

 

**spoilers**

 

By the ending, do you mean when the cameraperson runs down the stairs and fleetingly glimpses the one idiot facing the corner, and then the camera falls down?

 

**end spoilers**

 

2 of the three cast members have gone on to other things. The taller guy that played the camera man has been in many films and TV shows, including the well-received indie comedy Humpday a few years back, and a short stint on Bates Motel last year. The girl appeared in several things right after Blair Witch came out, but when her offers dried up, she went into the legal pot business, and later wrote a bestseller about her journey from actress to marijuana salesperson.

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A lady friend of mine was so terrified by Blair Witch that she literally had trouble sleeping for a couple of nights afterward. Totally baffled me. But she was born and raised in Queens, NY, so the woods were largely an alien realm to her. To me it was 3 annoying idiots screaming and crying while they wandered around the woods for an hour. 

 

**spoilers**

 

By the ending, do you mean when the cameraperson runs down the stairs and fleetingly glimpses the one idiot facing the corner, and then the camera falls down?

 

**end spoilers**

 

2 of the three cast members have gone on to other things. The taller guy that played the camera man has been in many films and TV shows, including the well-received indie comedy Humpday a few years back, and a short stint on Bates Motel last year. The girl appeared in several things right after Blair Witch came out, but when her offers dried up, she went into the legal pot business, and later wrote a bestseller about her journey from actress to marijuana salesperson.

 

awesome. i like her even more now.

 

yeah- i meant the scene in the corner. freaked me all the hell out. i still slept fine though, i'm a heavy sleeper.

 

i wiki'd the three leads and yeah, there are some post-BWP credits, but not many and nothing sustaining. one of them has decided to become an NYC guidance counselor.

 

Believe me, I really wanted to hate the movie, nothing disgusts me more than siding with the masses on something. I feel like i need one of those SILKWOOD showers when I side with the populace at large.

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Although I do like the film, I'd suggest you forego a viewing if you suffer from bouts of vertigo or motion sickness..  ;)

 

Sepiatone

Thanks, Sepia.

 

I do sometimes get motion sickness unless I have taken some gravol, so  I might skip it.

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A lady friend of mine was so terrified by Blair Witch that she literally had trouble sleeping for a couple of nights afterward. Totally baffled me. 

 

I had a nightmare the night I saw it (only two movies in my life gave me nightmares, and that was one).  It was a replaying of the final scene.  Ugh.  But after that first night I was able to cope...

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A lady friend of mine was so terrified by Blair Witch that she literally had trouble sleeping for a couple of nights afterward. Totally baffled me. But she was born and raised in Queens, NY, so the woods were largely an alien realm to her. To me it was 3 annoying idiots screaming and crying while they wandered around the woods for an hour. 

 

**spoilers**

 

By the ending, do you mean when the cameraperson runs down the stairs and fleetingly glimpses the one idiot facing the corner, and then the camera falls down?

 

**end spoilers**

 

2 of the three cast members have gone on to other things. The taller guy that played the camera man has been in many films and TV shows, including the well-received indie comedy Humpday a few years back, and a short stint on Bates Motel last year. The girl appeared in several things right after Blair Witch came out, but when her offers dried up, she went into the legal pot business, and later wrote a bestseller about her journey from actress to marijuana salesperson.

Well, you know Lawrence it is not just the female who is wimpy, since I remember going to a midnight movie showing of "Freaks" while I was in college, and sitting in front of me were two of the university's largest football players, munching on their popcorn and making cracks as the credits rolled.

 

During the first scene when the elderly lady calls to the freaks, who she refers to as her "children" to show themselves, Johnny Eck the Half Boy is seen zooming across the wooded area and the two football giants start screaming in fear and jump up, spilling their popcorn and then they zoom also up the aisle and leave!

 

Well, I'm sitting there thinking "What babies!" Every time I saw them on campus after that I would have to secretly laugh to myself about what wuses they were! I also had a friend who I showed "Candyman" to and she kept putting a pillow in front of her face during the movie, and blamed me for her having nightmares for weeks.

 

I guess I am just immune to believing any movie is real, no matter how convincing it is. I imagine the cameraman standing there right out of eyeshot, and it ruins any chance I believe what is happening is real. I did think the premise though of Blair Witch was very clever and did add to its believability.

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Well, you know Lawrence it is not just the female who is wimpy, 

 

I guess I am just immune to believing any movie is real, no matter how convincing it is. I imagine the cameraman standing there right out of eyeshot, and it ruins any chance I believe what is happening is real. I did think the premise though of Blair Witch was very clever and did add to its believability.

 

 

I had a nightmare the night I saw it (only two movies in my life gave me nightmares, and that was one).  It was a replaying of the final scene.  Ugh.  But after that first night I was able to cope...

 

Cavegirl: I hope you didn't think I included her gender in a disparaging manner. If it had been a guy, I would have gladly stated so. Her husband thought the movie was scary as well, but it didn't give him nightmares, at least none that he admitted to!

 

Eugenia: I actually envy people who can get still get a frisson of fear from a movie. It's been a looong time since a movie scared me. I think, as Cavegirl mentioned, I'm too aware of the artifice for it to strike me on such a primal level.  All I ever see in my nightmares is June Allyson. 

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