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LGBT Issues--


Princess of Tap

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...In France they just call it this: WC because all the other stuff we have in the bathroom is in another room anyway.

 

 

fields.jpg

 

"AH yes. I still remember that time I was in Paris and saw my initials on

all those doors. Strange people those Frenchies!"

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I do not understand why this issue is so complicated. Way back twenty years ago when designing store interiors, more than 75% simply built "rest rooms". The 80's & 90's was the first wave of people "coming out" and androgyny a popular schtick; think Bowie, Boy George & Annie Lenox. 

 

Now granted, these weren't international big box chain stores, but I would design several single wash rooms in a line, like fitting rooms. The plumbing was still all in one place.

People would ask, "Where's the ladies room?" and we'd guide them to the row of doors. They'd ask which is ladies/men room and we'd say whatever you like.

No co-mingling. **** anyway.

Hospitals and hotel lobbies have done this for years.

 

For fun, in an art supply store, I painted different murals on the doors. Each contained both men & women in the picture. For example, a formation of water skiers and an old west campfire at night. Most men chose the doors with more "masculine" colors, like browns & blues and the women chose the doors with more "feminine" colors like yellow and green.

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I do not understand why this issue is so complicated.

 

It's not.

 

People just try to make it complicated because they don't want transgender people to have rights - or to be treated fairly - or to even exist. So they invent a fake problem as a way of expressing their petulance about it. That's actually pretty simple - not complicated at all.

 

Nobody with anything on the ball at all is fooled by this made-up "controversy". The Supreme Court will put an end to the shenanigans eventually.

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Which brings me to the actual mechanism and place itself--

 

The Convenience

The Water Closet

 

In France they just call it this: WC because all the other stuff we have in the bathroom is in another room anyway.

 

Of course, that room is called the bathroom, La Salle de Bains.

And all the variants with the s word in them.

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On the hole, I would rather be in Philadelphia.

 

 

What a shame this funny self-proposed epitaph and final little dig at his hometown isn't actually on the great comedian's tomb there in Glendale California's Forest Lawn, isn't it Vautrin.

 

fieldswc.jpg

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What a shame this funny self-proposed epitaph and final little dig at his hometown isn't actually on the great comedian's tomb there in Glendale California's Forest Lawn, isn't it Vautrin.

 

fieldswc.jpg

Bill kept it very basic, didn't he. The whole

Philadelphia thing is another one of those

show biz quotes that gets mangled up, but it

would have been great if it had been part

of his epitaph.

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Bill kept it very basic, didn't he. The whole

Philadelphia thing is another one of those

show biz quotes that gets mangled up, but it

would have been great if it had been part

of his epitaph.

 

Actually, or at least according to W.C. Fields' Wikiquote page, he once proposed in a 1925 Vanity Fair article that his epitaph read:

 

"Here lies W. C. Fields. I would rather be living in Philadelphia."

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Actually, or at least according to W.C. Fields' Wikiquote page, he once proposed in a 1925 Vanity Fair article that his epitaph read:

 

"Here lies W. C. Fields. I would rather be living in Philadelphia."

Too bad he didn't use it. A fate not quite as bad as death.

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It is interesting that the same people who are in favor of these restrictive laws are the same ones that proslytize that government at lowest level is best and keep big government out.  In the NC situation, the city council of Charlotte passed a law.  The state decided in its big brother role to take away little Charlotte's authority.

Also interesting that Gov. McCrory is former executive of Duke Energy, largest utility company in America.  Another over regualted industry in their opinion.  So it is OK to regulate what cities do?

The difference between GA and NC is that the gov. of GA is finished as he cannot run for reelection. Gov. McCrory is running for reelection in NC.  It's all about getting the GOPer votes.

 

Do you know why Charlotte's city council felt the need to pass a law?  e.g.  was it illegal under existing Charlotte law for a transgender female to use a women's restroom?   OR was there no legal (tangible) reason for Charlotte to pass a law and the council did so to make a political statement?

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Do you know why Charlotte's city council felt the need to pass a law?  e.g.  was it illegal under existing Charlotte law for a transgender female to use a women's restroom?   OR was there no legal (tangible) reason for Charlotte to pass a law and the council did so to make a political statement?

Don't know, Vautrin might.  One issue is the other parts of the bill that prohibit municipalities and counties from enacting certain types of laws.

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Don't know, Vautrin might.  One issue is the other parts of the bill that prohibit municipalities and counties from enacting certain types of laws.

 

We agree that there was no reason for the GOP state representatives to go out of their way to pass a law that invalidated local laws regardless of why local authorities pass their law.     As you noted this is hypocrisy from GOP members who typically favor local control.   Well now the Feds are overriding the state.  Karma is a,,, well you know what I mean. 

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I don't know the exact reason why they decided to pass

the law. I don't think it was because of any specific action.

Probably there was some movement on the part of activists

to get it down in black and white and make it officially legal.

I'm sure there is plenty of info on the net. Besides the

bathroom section, HB2 doesn't list sexual orientation or

gender identity as conditions that cannot be discriminated

against and that people can't sue in state court if they

are discriminated against for those reasons, though McCrory

is against this last part. It also prohibits local governments

from raising the minimum wage. The NC legislature has

become rather notorious for bigfooting into local affairs,

in spite of the conservative respect for local government, at

least in theory. They tried to take away Charlotte's administration

of the airport and tried to regionalize the Asheville water system.

I think both of these are still in the courts. So these folks

complaining about the interference of the feds is fun to watch.

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I don't know the exact reason why they decided to pass

the law. I don't think it was because of any specific action.

Probably there was some movement on the part of activists

to get it down in black and white and make it officially legal.

I'm sure there is plenty of info on the net. Besides the

bathroom section, HB2 doesn't list sexual orientation or

gender identity as conditions that cannot be discriminated

against and that people can't sue in state court if they

are discriminated against for those reasons, though McCrory

is against this last part. It also prohibits local governments

from raising the minimum wage. The NC legislature has

become rather notorious for bigfooting into local affairs,

in spite of the conservative respect for local government, at

least in theory. They tried to take away Charlotte's administration

of the airport and tried to regionalize the Asheville water system.

I think both of these are still in the courts. So these folks

complaining about the interference of the feds is fun to watch.

 

Thanks for the info.  I did search the net but I couldn't find anything about why the specific Charlotte law was passed (e.g. all the links are pressing a political POV).    

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Thanks for the info.  I did search the net but I couldn't find anything about why the specific Charlotte law was passed (e.g. all the links are pressing a political POV).    

I don't know if I linked to the right article, but it should be

one from the Charlotte newspaper that explains some of

the basics of the decision to pass the law, though I don't

know if it gives all the details.

 

http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/politics-government/article61786967.html

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A Recap:

 

April 29, 2014: The U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights publishes a 53-page document that offers “guidance” on sexual assault for schools that receive federal funding through Title IX, the 1972 civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in federally funded education programs and activities.

 

For the first time, the federal government says explicitly that “Title IX’s sex discrimination prohibition extends to claims of discrimination based on gender identity or failure to conform to stereotypical notions of masculinity or femininity” and that “the actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity of the parties does not change a school’s obligations ...” In other words, transgender people are protected from discrimination under the law.

 

March 2, 2015: The City Council holds a public hearing in advance of the vote to add the protected classes. It draws 117 people, many of them furious about a specific provision in the proposed language that would allow transgender people to use publicly accessible restrooms according to the gender they identify with. Opponents claim this would allow sexual predators to cite the law to gain access to public bathrooms.

 

An amendment removes restrooms, locker rooms, showers, and changing rooms from the proposed changes. The amended ordinance is voted down, 6-5.

 

November 3, 2015: Charlotte elects a new mayor, former Mecklenburg County Board of Commissioners chair Jennifer Roberts, who openly supports the LGBT-inclusive changes that were originally proposed in March. The City Council adds two new members, Democrats Julie Eiselt and James Mitchell, both of whom also support the changes.

 

November 21, 2015: North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory issues a release that calls on Attorney General Roy Cooper—a Democrat running for governor in 2016—to “stop the federal government from taking over our schools, and challenge the ACLU and President Obama's attempt to force local districts to open sex-specific locker rooms and bathrooms to individuals of the opposite biological sex.” (The impetus is a pending federal civil rights case involving a 16-year-old transgender boy in Virginia

 

January 2016: During its winter meeting in Charleston, South Carolina, the Republican National Committee issues a memo that “calls on the Department of Education to rescind its interpretation of Title IX that wrongly includes facility use issues by transgender students”; “encourages state legislatures to recognize that these Obama gender identity policies are a federal governmental overreach”; and “encourages state legislatures to enact laws that protect student privacy and limit the use of restrooms, locker rooms and similar facilities to members of the sex to whom the facility is designated.”

 

February 1: The city and Community Building Initiative hold a public forum on the LGBT protections, which are coming back up for a vote.

 

February 22: The City Council, after another public hearing that draws more than 140 speakers, votes 7-4 to add gay and transgender people to the list of classes protected against discrimination in Charlotte, effective April 1. McCrory has already warned two council members about the prospect of “immediate state legislative intervention.”

 

February 23: N.C. House Speaker Tim Moore also calls for legislative action, focusing specifically on “the bathroom piece” of Charlotte’s ordinance changes.

 

March 3: Republican legislative leaders—including Moore, Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger, and Senator Buck Newton, who’s running for Attorney General—hold a news conference renewing their support of a special session to overturn the Charlotte ordinance.

 

March 21: Moore and Lt. Gov. Dan Forest, the Senate president, call a special session for two days later. They do so against the wishes of McCrory, who declines to order the session because he worries that the General Assembly will go “beyond the scope of the bathroom issue,” says a McCrory aide.

 

March 23: In one day, the General Assembly goes far, far beyond the scope of the bathroom issue. McCrory signs it into law within hours of its passage.

 

March 28: The ACLU of North Carolina leads a lawsuit against the state in federal court, alleging that HB2 violates the Equal Protection Clause of the U.S. Constitution's 14th Amendment.

 

March 29: Cooper, calling the new law “a national embarrassment,” says his office will not defend the state against the ACLU suit.

 

April 5: The international financial company PayPal cancels its plans for a 400-job, $36 million operations center in Charlotte.

 

April 8: Bruce Springsteen cancels his April 10 concert in Greensboro because of HB2. “Some things are more inportant than a rock show," he writes on his website, “and this fight against prejudice and bigotry, which is happening as I write, is one of them.”

 

April 12: McCrory issues an executive order that adds sexual orientation and gender identity to the list of protected classes among state employees but leaves the bulk of HB2 intact.

 

April 19: The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, which has jurisdiction over North Carolina, rules in favor of Gavin Grimm, the transgender teenager in Virginia. In a 2-1 ruling that sent the case back to U.S. District Court, the appeals court says the Virginia school district's refusal to allow the boy to use the restroom that corresponds to his gender identity violates Title IX, the federal law that prohibits sex discrimination by schools that receive federal funding.

 

April 20: Berger says he does not support a repeal of HB2, despite the 4th Circuit’s ruling in the Grimm case.

 

April 25: The General Assembly convenes for a short session and takes no action on HB2.

 

May 4: The U.S. Justice Department's Civil Rights Division tells McCrory that HB2 violates federal civil rights law and asks him to respond by May 9. McCrory and other state officials accuse the Justice Department of overreach.

 

May 9: McCrory and legislative leaders Berger and Moore file separate lawsuits against the Justice Department, seeking a ruling that HB2 does not discriminate against LGBT people—and therefore doesn't violate federal civil rights law. The Justice Department sues North Carolina, alleging that the law violates three specific federal civil rights laws, including Title IX. “This law provides no benefit to society,” says U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch, a North Carolina native. “All it does is harm innocent Americans.”

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Idon't know how it is in other states, but in SC and NC, all other government entities exist at the pleasure of the state.  In other words, technically the legislatures could abolish cities, counties, school districts, etc.

Years ago, SC legislature passed the Home Rule Act which established the rights of local governments. They have continuously chipped away at it ever since.

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There was a short article in the paper a few days ago about

some of the legislative leaders reaching out to Roberts on

the qt and proposing, you get rid of the ordinance and we'll

get rid of HB2. So far, she isn't budging. When the same

sex marriage issue was pretty much decided, Cooper told

the GOPers that it would be a waste of time and money to

keep on fighting it, but they didn't believe him. I don't recall

if they actually spent money to keep up a futile fight, but I

wouldn't be surprised if they did.

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We agree that there was no reason for the GOP state representatives to go out of their way to pass a law that invalidated local laws regardless of why local authorities pass their law.     As you noted this is hypocrisy from GOP members who typically favor local control.   Well now the Feds are overriding the state.  Karma is a,,, well you know what I mean. 

 

They only favor local control when it coincides with their political views........

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I wouldn't expect anything less from the 12th state of the Confederacy.

Kentucky was the 12th and Missouri was the 13th.  Oklahoma was not even a state at the time, but rather Indian Territory.

While KY and MO were "recognized" by the CSA, their seccessions were not acts of the actual, legitimate governments of those states.

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