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NAME A SCREEN CHARACTER YOU'D LOVE TO PITCHFORK


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DEFINITELY pitchfork worthy:

Any of those flying blue monkeys in THE WIZARD OF OZ.

They always creeped me out. Maybe it was that constant smile on their faces, like they knew something evil was about to happen, that played a role in it.

1e344e1c752cd9cd320144b1e38d1ceb--wizard

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9 minutes ago, TomJH said:

It's been a while since I saw The Dirty Dozen but, if memory serves me correctly, I believe I would not have been too distraught if Telly Savalas' character had landed on a pitchfork.

IIRC, the character receives some karmic feedback shortly thereafter.

3 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

But Maggott was such a nice, God-fearing soldier.

gettyimages-126147256__square.jpg

And such an appropriate name...

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I actually find the idea that the villain has to die in the last few minutes of the movie a rather annoying convention, assuming that the audience shares the blood lust the movie makers have so cynically cultivated.  I'm reminded of Stuart Klawans' reference to "The Final Bad Guy--the leader of a whole gang of monsters who must be killed off one by one in ascending order of importance."  He gives the example of Clear and Present Danger ("an uninvolving movie based on an unreadable novel"), which I may have seen and completely forgotten about, but the classic example before that was Die Hard

t
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I know what you mean.  I have no problem with a movie in which the villain escapes with his life, but still doesn't escape justice.  And even if he escapes justice still fails to achieve his ultimate goal.

And too, it kinda boils down to what you believe.  I can't at this moment remember the book, but one I read had, at the end, two guys talking about the villain in the story escaping the authorities, "Well," said one, "Looks like he got away with it."  And the other replied, "Ah, but only until he dies.  Then GOD will have a say." ;)

 

Sepiatone

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On 11/21/2017 at 8:18 PM, NipkowDisc said:

virginia mayo as verna in white heat.

 

On 11/22/2017 at 9:48 AM, jamesjazzguitar said:

I would add mom to that as well.     

I would add James Cagney as Cody!!!!

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3 hours ago, sagebrush said:

 

I would add James Cagney as Cody!!!!

Well heck in THAT case, why don't we just go all the way and name Steve Cochran as a pitchfork recipient here TOO?!

;)

(...he was more than a little bit of a, ahem, dirty rat in that flick TOO, ya know)

 

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Well, since we're going through the cast of White Heat, I'd LOVE to give a pitchfork to Edmond O'Brien's FBI undercover agent Hank Fallon.

Cody practically adopted him as a kid brother, treating him better than anyone else in his gang, with O'Brien playing up to him all the way. Cody, who had a few trust issues, even opened up to him about talking to his dead mother in the woods, something he wouldn't tell anybody else.

But it's O'Brien who shoots him with that telescopic rifle when Cody's cornered on top of that gas tank at the end of the film. And when Cody doesn't die conveniently enough for him, O'Brien complains, "WHAT'S HOLDING HIM UP?" as he prepares to take aim at him again.

Yeh, I know Cody's a psycho and we're all better without him.

But for being such a two face, as well as acting as a cold blooded executioner to a man who treated him well, I give Edmond O'Brien the pitchfork!

White-Heat-OBrien.png

"What's holding him up?"

Quick, someone, get me a pitchfork for this cold blooded rat!

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Ya know Tom, somehow I KNEW somebody, and probably you, would once again mention O'Brien's actions at the climax of this flick and thus suggest his character was also a worthy pitchfork recipient. ;)

(...as we've of course discussed this issue a few times in the past around here)

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3 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Ya know Tom, somehow I KNEW somebody, and probably you, would once again mention O'Brien's actions at the climax of this flick and thus suggest his character was also a worthy pitchfork recipient. ;)

(...as we've of course discussed this issue a few times in the past around here)

Didn't want to disappoint you, Dargo.

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14 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Didn't want to disappoint you, Dargo.

Why, thanks Tom!

But don't worry, ol' buddy. After all our mutually shared years around this place, not ONCE have I ever recalled you disappointing me!

(...well, other than perhaps that one time you...well...let's not go into THAT right now) ;)

LOL

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21 hours ago, Dargo said:

Well heck in THAT case, why don't we just go all the way and name Steve Cochran as a pitchfork recipient here TOO?!

;)

(...he was more than a little bit of a, ahem, dirty rat in that flick TOO, ya know)

 

I don't find the Cochran character to be a pitchfork recipient.   Everything he does has a sound motive for someone that is part of a gang lead by Cody.  I mean it is just a matter of time before Cody kills you off (unless you're mommy),  so one might as well get some tail and try to kill Cody first.    So he was just doing what comes naturally for someone in his position.

The others have deeply flawed personalities,   especially as Tom notes,  the O'Brien character.   The look on his face when he says 'what's holding him up' is creepy.      

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I am new here, but I am such a fan of old films, I wanted to join in to the discussions on here.

The characters I would love to pitchfork....someone already mentioned the general from The Ox-Bow Incident, I think the whole lynch mob deserved a run in with the pitchfork, they all had the blood of those three innocent men they were screaming to be hung without waiting for the facts to come in.

Also can't argue with Nurse Ratched from One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. What a hateful witch, under the guise of patience and understanding. 

Crassus from Spartacus and Commodus from Gladiator each deserved a painful twist with the pitchfork as well (though SPOILER ALERT Maximus did deliver a painful and satisfying sword thrust into Commodus' throat).

 

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7 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I don't find the Cochran character to be a pitchfork recipient.   Everything he does has a sound motive for someone that is part of a gang lead by Cody.  I mean it is just a matter of time before Cody kills you off (unless you're mommy),  so one might as well get some tail and try to kill Cody first.    So he was just doing what comes naturally for someone in his position.

The others have deeply flawed personalities,   especially as Tom notes,  the O'Brien character.   The look on his face when he says 'what's holding him up' is creepy.      

Can't say I was shedding over any tears over Big Ed, I think he had designs on taking over Cody's crew (as well as snagging Verna) from the beginning, and true he may not have been as psychotic as Cody, I do think he had the potential to become worse over time.

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On ‎11‎/‎24‎/‎2017 at 6:22 PM, TomJH said:

Well, since we're going through the cast of White Heat, I'd LOVE to give a pitchfork to Edmond O'Brien's FBI undercover agent Hank Fallon.

Cody practically adopted him as a kid brother, treating him better than anyone else in his gang, with O'Brien playing up to him all the way. Cody, who had a few trust issues, even opened up to him about talking to his dead mother in the woods, something he wouldn't tell anybody else.

But it's O'Brien who shoots him with that telescopic rifle when Cody's cornered on top of that gas tank at the end of the film. And when Cody doesn't die conveniently enough for him, O'Brien complains, "WHAT'S HOLDING HIM UP?" as he prepares to take aim at him again.

Yeh, I know Cody's a psycho and we're all better without him.

But for being such a two face, as well as acting as a cold blooded executioner to a man who treated him well, I give Edmond O'Brien the pitchfork!

White-Heat-OBrien.png

"What's holding him up?"

Quick, someone, get me a pitchfork for this cold blooded rat!

 

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I honestly don't understand why some people think Fallon is more worthy of a pitchfork over the truly rotten evil guys like Cody, his ma, Big Ed and Verna. Fallon was on the side of the law, to try and bring down the bad guys. Fallon had an obligation to try and protect society and if that means going undercover to try to do it, then so be it. Lots of cops in the real world go undercover all the time even in today's world

Cagney is brilliant as Cody Jarrett, he's absolutely fascinating to watch, but let's face it, he needed to be taken out, he was a total psycho, he has killed in cold blood on more than one occasion. He needed to go.

His ma made him the way he was, and while I can understand while some might sympathize with him because of this, it still doesn't make him any less dangerous.

Big Ed wasn't nearly as crazy as Cody, but he was just as ruthless and I think had he succeeded in his plot to kill Cody, he might just have become just as dangerous as Cody over time.

Verna may very well be the lesser of all four evils but she is still a two-timing snake, ready to throw you under the bus to save her own skin (she's lucky Cody never found out it was she and not Big Ed who killed his beloved Ma).

Fallon is a saint compared to these four. Of course this is just my opinion.

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33 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I honestly don't understand why some people think Fallon is more worthy of a pitchfork over the truly rotten evil guys like Cody, his ma, Big Ed and Verna. Fallon was on the side of the law, to try and bring down the bad guys. Fallon had an obligation to try and protect society and if that means going undercover to try to do it, then so be it. Lots of cops in the real world go undercover all the time even in today's world

Cagney is brilliant as Cody Jarrett, he's absolutely fascinating to watch, but let's face it, he needed to be taken out, he was a total psycho, he has killed in cold blood on more than one occasion. He needed to go.

His ma made him the way he was, and while I can understand while some might sympathize with him because of this, it still doesn't make him any less dangerous.

Big Ed wasn't nearly as crazy as Cody, but he was just as ruthless and I think had he succeeded in his plot to kill Cody, he might just have become just as dangerous as Cody over time.

Verna may very well be the lesser of all four evils but she is still a two-timing snake, ready to throw you under the bus to save her own skin (she's lucky Cody never found out it was she and not Big Ed who killed his beloved Ma).

Fallon is a saint compared to these four. Of course this is just my opinion.

Welcome to the boards, Bethluvsfilms (nice moniker).

I guess I went after Fallon because it's easy to go after Cody (after all, this guy shoots people locked up in the trunk of his car while munching on a chicken leg).

But Fallon has always been accepted as a "good guy" in the film because he's FBI. But his duplicitous behaviour in befriending a hood (while necessary, I realize, for an undercover agent) highlights his chameleon like personality. Let's face it, most of us wouldn't be able to do something like that. And while it might mean that Fallon is very good at what he does (not to mention courageous) it also means that there is a cold blooded Jekyll/Hyde quality to him, especially since, at the film's end, he is gladly ready to act as executioner to a man who befriended him and treated him well.

Ever see the movie Donnie Brasco with Johnny Depp and Al Pacino? It explores the same territory I'm discussing here much more but, in this case, the FBI agent can't follow through in a betrayal of a gangster because he has come to love him through their friendship which developed over months under cover.

I will admit, though, that Pacino's gangster is a lot easier to like than Cagney's nutso Cody Jarrett. But, nut or not, Cody treated Fallon well. Can anyone blame Cody for a sense of betrayal when he finds out he's FBI?

A big pitchfork for Hank Fallon!

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3 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Welcome to the boards, Bethluvsfilms (nice moniker).

I guess I went after Fallon because it's easy to go after Cody (after all, this guy shoots people locked up in the trunk of his car while munching on a chicken leg).

But Fallon has always been accepted as a "good guy" in the film because he's FBI. But his duplicitous behaviour in befriending a hood (while necessary, I realize, for an undercover agent) highlights his chameleon like personality. Let's face it, most of us wouldn't be able to do something like that. And while it might mean that Fallon is very good at what he does (not to mention courageous) it also means that there is a cold blooded Jekyll/Hyde quality to him, especially since, at the film's end, he is gladly ready to act as executioner to a man who befriended him and treated him well.

Ever see the movie Donnie Brasco with Johnny Depp and Al Pacino? It explores the same territory I'm discussing here much more but, in this case, the FBI agent can't follow through in a betrayal of a gangster because he has come to love him through their friendship which developed over months under cover.

I will admit, though, that Pacino's gangster is a lot easier to like than Cagney's nutso Cody Jarrett. But, nut or not, Cody treated Fallon well. Can anyone blame Cody for a sense of betrayal when he finds out he's FBI?

A big pitchfork for Hank Fallon!

Thank you for the welcome TomJH.

I've seen Donnie Brasco (great film BTW). I do see the similarities there as well as the differences. But one can argue that Fallon had more common sense than to allow himself to become emotionally attached to a full-fledged lunatic like Cody.

I can also understand why it can be easy to root for Cody, despite his evil nature. He is played to perfection and with such charisma by James Cagney (my favorite movie actor). I have to confess that I was kind of on his side when he shot Big Ed for trying to double cross him.....but then I remember how he so evilly killed all the people on the train and had no problem with shooting Parker in the trunk (yeah I know Parker was in on Big Ed's scheme to knock off Cody but still...).

In a way I do think Cody kind of won in the end though. Even though he would have preferred to have gotten away with the robbery, he chose his own way out, robbing Fallon, the other cops and the DA the satisfaction of arresting him, convicting him, and sending him to the gas chamber. His blowing himself up was his big middle finger to all of them.

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The whole lynch mob in The Ox-Bow Incident deserved to face the end of a pitchfork.

Crassus in Spartacus and Commodus in Gladiator both needed the pitchfork in the throat (although in Commodus' case he did get his much deserved comeuppance at the hands of the hero he wronged by a knife in the throat).

Nurse Ratched in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest was one hateful witch under the guise of patience and sweetness. Wouldn't have minded seeing her get hers by the old 'fork.

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Would just like to interject here and say that after returning home this evening and reading newbie Bethluvsfilms' VERY well stated opinions and insightful thoughts on the subject of the Fallon character's "pitchfork-ness", that THIS now makes TWO newbies I've discovered within the last 24 hours who seem to "catch on really quickly", if some of you regulars know what I mean. ;)

Yep, we seem to be on a pretty good roll here lately, what with the addition of Beth and Lord Byron to our ranks.

(...this of course would have nothing at all to do with the idea that I absolutely agree with her take on this subject)

;)

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Ethel Waters in The Member of the Wedding. I once heard Butterfly McQueen say something like Ethel was the meanest woman she'd ever met, and I bet Frankie felt that way too about Waters. Who cares if Frankie has gritty elbows and wants to call herself Jasmine?

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17 minutes ago, GordonCole said:

Ethel Waters in The Member of the Wedding. I once heard Butterfly McQueen say something like Ethel was the meanest woman she'd ever met, and I bet Frankie felt that way too about Waters. Who cares if Frankie has gritty elbows and wants to call herself Jasmine?

Are you talking about the character in the film or the actress?   

Here is what Wikipedia has to say about the character: With the help of warm-hearted housekeeper Berenice Sadie Brown (Ethel Waters), Frankie eventually makes an awkward transition to young womanhood.

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Ray Milland in Kitty (1945).

As a matter of fact I want to pitchfork this guy so bad I'd like to have a run of about 100 feet or so just to make sure that I would pin him to a wall with the farm implement.

Milland's character is a self centred despicable louse who plays Pygmalion with Paulette Goddard's title character, a guttersnipe he helps turn into a lady only so he could then mercilessly exploit her in order to further his political career. This human oink oink not only constantly abuses her verbally but tries to marry her off to a pompous artistocrat because of the career rewards that he thinks will come his way afterward. Not once in the film (until the film's final seconds) does he give a damn about the feelings of the girl. To him, no matter how beautifully coiffed she may be, she is still a disposable guttersnipe.

Finally Goddard meets another aristo who is nice guy (played by Patric Knowles), who treats her well and wants to marry her. Well Milland tries his best to sabotage that relationship, of course.

Yet through it all, no matter how badly he treats her, Goddard loves Milland (this is, perhaps, the most sickening part of all, though, lord knows, it is also a reflection of reality with some women attracted to and always ready to forgive a creepy bad boy who mistreats them). At the film's end Goddard turns down nice guy Knowles in order to reunite with louse Milland. This is the film's so called "happy ending," even though we know that Milland will just continue to mistreat a woman who clearly suffers from low self esteem.

But if I had had my chance I would have denied Goddard the opportunity to make that ludicrous choice by driving a pitchfork through Milland's greedy little heart.

kitty_0.jpg?itok=9Hsxci7G

Look out, lady, that's a viper putting on the charm.

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