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NAME A SCREEN CHARACTER YOU'D LOVE TO PITCHFORK


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I'd like to pitchfork Frau Blucher in Young Frankenstein except . . .

 

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. . . I'd be afraid that those frightened horses might get me by accident

 

 

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 One guy who I (and a few others) "pitchforked" some time ago was Max Showalter / Casey Adams.  After a while I felt a little guilty about that, my main reason for singling him out was the character (Jean Peters' husband)  he played in NIAGARA . I always make that character association with him whenever I see him in another film. So can I "pitchfork" Max?  Yeah, I guess I can (at least as that character).

 

It's pretty easy decision making for me.

 

Whenever Casey Adams opens his huge mouth to let out a loud "YUCK-YUCK-YUCK-YUCK-YUCK" gale of laughter . . .

 

16candles497.jpeg

 

PITCHFORK HIM!!!!

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I'm sorry to have disappointed you, limey.  To make up for the ripe gouda you must be feeling right now allow me to recommend a truly horrible war comedy for your viewing dis-pleasure!   

 

     The 1970 Dino de Laurentiis-produced film "OPERATION S.N.A.F.U." (Situation Normal All Fouled Up).  Directed by Nanni Loy.  Whoever he is.  This is the unfunniest comedy I've ever seen.  It's amazingly unfunny, but it does possess a good cast.  Stars Jason Robards, Martin Landau, Nino Manfredi, Scott Hylands, Slim Pickens and Peter Falk in a cameo as 'Peter Pawney'. 

 

     I ran across this awful movie when I was attempting to round up ALLIED ARTISTS VIDEO CORPORATION tapes.  Allied only released tapes from 1978 thru September 1979 (when they went bankrupt and were bought up by Lorimar).  One of the releases I found was OPERATION S.N.A.F.U. and so I bought it.  In fact, I found 2 copies and bought them both.  ► I later traded one to someone else who was a glutton for video punishment.  Hee Hee.   

 

      This is supposed to be a war comedy.  Except it's not funny at all.  Despite watching it 3 times I still can't figure out exactly why it's so bad.  It just IS.  I watched it twice on the one tape and one time on the tape I traded to make sure the videocassette played well.  Limey, if you fancy watching good actors in a terrible movie well then this WW2 comedy offers you 95 minutes of of non-enjoyment!   :P

 

     Cheers. 

 

Well, that took me on an interesting little detour...

 

Intrigued by the glowing recommendation, I went hunting for this gem, initially finding only references to a 1965 British comedy film (alternately known as On the Fiddle), starring a bunch of favorites, including John Le Mesurier, Barbara Windsor, Wilfred Hyde-White & Sean Connery. This interested me, so I will have to track down a copy.

 

However, I did eventually find reference to Rosolino Paternò, soldato, which appears to the Italian title of Op SNAFU. I will also have to track this down now - to see if it is as truly dire as you describe. Ta very much. :)

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A small clue as to how bad & obscure OPERATION S.N.A.F.U. is:  There are no 'User Comments' on the IMDb.  I reckon I could have written one, but I didn't bother.  

 

     The old Leonard Maltin video guide gave it what you'd expect:  BOMB. 

 

      Happy hunting, limey.  May your efforts pan out so that you may watch this dreadful movie and see how rancid it is!     

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It's "our" Miss W, not "out" Miss W. I'm not outing anyone.

 

's'ok, dgf, if I had any closet to come out of , I'd have done it here ages ago.

Perhaps it was a Freudian slip, and you were really thinking you'd like to kick me "out" of the boards here.

But I'm not really worried you wanted to do that, either.

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It's pretty easy decision making for me.

 

Whenever Casey Adams opens his huge mouth to let out a loud "YUCK-YUCK-YUCK-YUCK-YUCK" gale of laughter . . .

 

16candles497.jpeg

 

PITCHFORK HIM!!!!

I actually liked Max / Casey  as the obnoxious  grandfather in SIXTEEN CANDLES.  Perfect casting? :)

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This is  definitely about the character, not the actor.  Cary Grant's  Devlin in NOTORIOUS.  I would gladly pitchfork him.  He treats Ingrid Bergman like dirt through the entire film, using her, deceiving her, allowing her to risk her life in a dangerous assignment. Only in the final minutes  of the film does Devlin show a noble side and rushes to rescue Ingrid. I'm still not sure if he genuinely loves her or is  even capable of that. Poor Claude Rains, I never felt more empathy for a guy going to meet his certain doom. Maybe he is a dirty rat Nazi, but he really did  love the girl,  always did. When he discovered the girl was a spy he was devastated, but I don't think he would have even  considered killing Ingrid ( it was the evil mother who decided on that plan).   But when the chips were down Claude came through. He let Ingrid get away, even though he knew he was signing his own death sentence.  The wrong guy got "pitchforked" in this one

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Not to mention George Costanza.

 

I'd be OK with that as I found the character rather irritating. Actually, with the exception of Kramer, the other Seinfeld principle characters could do with a prod or two, too.

 

If the sentence concluding 'baby' was the only criteria, Kojak would currently be trying to defend himself with a lollypop - but, for whatever reason, such sayings fitted the character, whereas Walt Neff's utterances always led to...

 

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Two more characters worthy of a pitchfork:

 

1. Carole Lombard as Lily Garland in "Twentieth Century"

 

2. Charlie McCarthy in "You Can't Cheat An Honest Man" (though I guess in this case it wouldn't be a pitchfork so much as a wood chipper!)

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Not to mention George Costanza.

 

I'd be OK with that as I found the character rather irritating. Actually, with the exception of Kramer, the other Seinfeld principle characters could do with a prod or two, too.

 

If the sentence concluding 'baby' was the only criteria, Kojak would currently be trying to defend himself with a lollypop - but, for whatever reason, such sayings fitted the character, whereas Walt Neff's utterances always led to...

 

 

 

Well, limey baby, what I actually meant was, George Costanza used "baby" at least as much as Walter Neff did. Some people - and I'm one of them - find it really funny, the way Neff calls Phyllis "baby" , especially the sort of quick, clipped way he adds it at the end of a sentence.  So I was just mentioning that George of Seinfeld fame says "baby" a lot, too.

 

In point of fact (as Jennifer Jones' character in Beat the Devil says, a character, by the way, I'd like to pitchfork), I really like George Costanza and would emphatically NOT want to pitchfork him. George is my favourite Seinfeld character (although I love them all) and I would never opt for pitchforkification of him.

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Well, limey baby, what I actually meant was, George Costanza used "baby" at least as much as Walter Neff did. Some people - and I'm one of them - find it really funny, the way Neff calls Phyllis "baby" , especially the sort of quick, clipped way he adds it at the end of a sentence.  So I was just mentioning that George of Seinfeld fame says "baby" a lot, too.

 

In point of fact (as Jennifer Jones' character in Beat the Devil says, a character, by the way, I'd like to pitchfork), I really like George Costanza and would emphatically NOT want to pitchfork him. George is my favourite Seinfeld character (although I love them all) and I would never opt for pitchforkification of him.

 

Well misswonderly, bab - no, sorry, I've still got the holes from last time - that quick, clipped addition of the B word, may be one of the things that causes it to unduly lodge in my consciousness - it just seems out of place to my ears (plus, I'm not really looking for laughs in DI) - but, as per EugeniaH's post, differing opinion on where to point one's pitchfork is very much a personal thing (and a large part of the entertainment value of threads like this...).

 

Whilst an acknowledged act of heresy against it's many fans/ratings figures, I never could get into the Seinfeld series.

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Whilst an acknowledged act of heresy against it's many fans/ratings figures, I never could get into the Seinfeld series.

 

I was the same way, limey. I never could get into it. And I like Julia Louis-Dreyfus and Michael Richards (except for that ONE time...). Jason Alexander I could pass on, but he doesn't annoy me too terribly. But I know I'm in the minority, as nearly everyone else around, friends, family, all liked it. I watched a lot of stand-up comedy shows throughout the 80's and beyond, and Jerry Seinfeld was on so often, doing what seemed to be the same set every time for 10 years, that even his voice got to be grating for me. He's someone I would pitchfork multiple times. And yet I love Larry David.

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's'ok, dgf, if I had any closet to come out of , I'd have done it here ages ago.

Perhaps it was a Freudian slip, and you were really thinking you'd like to kick me "out" of the boards here.

But I'm not really worried you wanted to do that, either.

Having that done to you would make you "cry like a baby". Or, as the Boxtops once intoned it, "Cry like a bee-buy".

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In point of fact (as Jennifer Jones' character in Beat the Devil says, a character, by the way, I'd like to pitchfork), . . .

 

I'm a little surprised to hear you say this, MissW. It certainly can't be because of the way that Jennifer Jones plays that role, can it? I've always enjoyed her airhead characterization in Beat the Devil very much. And I'm surprised by that because nobody ever thinks of Jones for her comedy skills. I find the actress so engaging here (and I'm not a fan of her, in particular) that no matter how inane some of her character's ramblings may be, I can forgive her.

 

No pitchfork for this character from me. On those rare occasions in which I might watch a bit of Beat the Devil on TV, the Jones scenes are some of the real highlights for me.

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I understand LIMEY'S POV.

 

I too, could never get into the SEINFELD  TV show.  I thought the description "A show about nothing" was aptly put!

 

But in a FAR different way than what was meant by whomever coined it.

 

Didn't ever really care for Seinfeld as a stand-up either.

 

Sepiatone

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I'm a little surprised to hear you say this, MissW. It certainly can't be because of the way that Jennifer Jones plays that role, can it? I've always enjoyed her airhead characterization in Beat the Devil very much. And I'm surprised by that because nobody ever thinks of Jones for her comedy skills. I find the actress so engaging here (and I'm not a fan of her, in particular) that no matter how inane some of her character's ramblings may be, I can forgive her.

 

No pitchfork for this character from me. On those rare occasions in which I might watch a bit of Beat the Devil on TV, the Jones scenes are some of the real highlights for me.

 

Gwendolen Chelm is pitchfork worthy to me.   While she appears charming on the surface she is a pathological liar.  

 

While I enjoy the way Jones plays the character and the film,    Gwen is the type of women a man regrets having an affair with.

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Gwendolen Chelm is pitchfork worthy to me.   While she appears charming on the surface she is a pathological liar.  

 

While I enjoy way Jones plays the character and the film,    Gwen is the type of women a man regrets having an affair with.

 

Yeah, but she's fun to watch as a character in a film. I'm not asking anyone to have an affair with her.

 

the_devil_is_in_the_details_07.jpg

 

"Oh, Billy, Billy, they all want to pitchfork me. Me! I don't understand. I'm really a very nice person."

 

"That's right, darling, as long as someone doesn't leave you alone with their man."

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I understand LIMEY'S POV.

 

I too, could never get into the SEINFELD  TV show.  I thought the description "A show about nothing" was aptly put!

 

But in a FAR different way than what was meant by whomever coined it.

 

Didn't ever really care for Seinfeld as a stand-up either.

 

Sepiatone

 

Hmmmm....never got the idea that almost all SEINFELD episodes were basically little "morality plays", did ya Sepia?!

 

Nope, that sitcom was NEVER "a show about nothing". Nope, it was ALL about showing how people who aren't honest with others end up gettin' "karmically screwed" and "hoisted upon their own petard"!

 

(...and I LOVED it!!!)

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The entire cast of the TWILIGHT series

 

I've never really paid Twilight much attention, but it's vampires, right?

If so, pitchforks aren't going to be effective - what you need is a set of these...

 

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;)

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I too, could never get into the SEINFELD  TV show.  I thought the description "A show about nothing" was aptly put!

 

 

For a show about nothing, Seinfeld sure made me laugh a lot.

 

I bought a few seasons of the show a couple of years ago and only unsealed one of them yesterday. I watched "The Chaperone" and "The Big Salad," the first Seinfelds I've seen in years and I was chuckling and vastly amused by these characters all over again.

 

A bit of minutiae about the show about nothing for Seinfeld fans:

 

If you look at the first minute of the first episode of the show in Season One it is set in Tom's Restaurant with Jerry and George sitting at a table discussing a button on a shirt. Fast forward nine years and look at the last minute of the last episode of the series: same restaurant, same table, same two characters, same conversation about a button on a shirt.

 

Nine years have passed and these two men haven't changed (okay, physically, George's bigger, but you know what I mean).

 

Now, popular as this series remains to be with so many, how many of you have ever heard of this trivial fact before?

 

By the way, I don't throw pitchforks at any of this crowd of characters. Besides, if it hit Newman it would probably just bounce off anyway.

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