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All the Political Movies


spence
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 Someone may have already wrote this & obviously due to the mammoth overkill by all media trhesedays with the upcoming presidential election, I just thought I'd throw this one out there for others to reply & so-on. (SEE: A previous post I wrote here "All the President's Movies") this is a companion piece of sorts

 

& of course please post films I forgot & or comment on the films I do

 

I'm probably leaving out quite a bit, but here it goes:

 

& in no special order, except #1

 

"Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" (l939) (Columbia)-(the grandfather of 'em all!)

 

"All the President's Men" (l976)

 

"The Last Hurrah: (l958) (Col.)-(strangely, only the 2nd time both *Tracy & *Ford worked together & it was him that brought him to Hollywood; Remade in 1977 for tv w/Carroll 0'Connor)

 

"A Face in The Crowd" (l957) (UA)

 

"Lincoln" (2012) ($185m.)-(TRIVIA: *D. Day won an extraordinary (3rd) all leading actor *Oscars w/this *Spielberg bio)

 

"Frost/Nixon" (though a big *Academy contender, it only sold $16 million in tickets)

 

"Give 'Em Hell, Harry" (l975)

 

"Sunrise at Campobello" (l960)-(to me Bellamy was the finest FDR yet. Bill Murray, Edward Herrmann, Kenneth Branagh of course have also played him)

 

"1776"-(I was taken to this big musical as a "Field Trip' in school, when I was about 9/10 or so)

 

"The Candidate" (l972)-(both Ebert & siskel loved this & rated it as the finest on politics)

 

"Bulworth" (l998) (grossed $28m.)

 

"The American President" (l995) ($60m.)

 

"Wag the Dog" (l997) (made $43m.)

 

"JFK" (l99l) ($70m.,)  "Nixon" (l995) ($14m.)  "W" (2008) ($30m.)

 

"Charlie Wilson's War" ($62m.)

 

"Seduction of Joe Tynan" (l979)

 

"Seven Days in May" (l964)

 

"The Best Man" (l964)

 

*"All the King's Men" (l949) (the *Oscar sweeper originally was gonna' have *John Wayne in it's lead, *"The Duke" reportedly turned it down though & ironically, it was *Crawford that defeated *Wayne for Best Actor that yr. *"The Duke" nommed for "Sands of Iwo Jima") (& there's a 2005 remake w/*Penn, *Winlstet & many others, but for some strange reason it came out flat & mediocre (**) ($20m.) 

 

"Blaze" (l989)

 

"Wilson" (l944) (Fox)-(this epic bio swept 5 *Academy Awards, but is widely known as a $B.O.$ flop?)

 

 should know this of all people *"The Great: Tracy" once made '33's "Power & the Glory" (Fox) but was it a poilitical drama & was "Kane???"  Which I've seen many, many times. Depends on a viewers pt of view I reckon' :wub:

Rarely aired anywhere & I've yet to see it either)

 

(To GregoryPeckFan,  I keep seeing *Gregory in a politrical bio/film???)

 

 

KUDOS TO PERSON THAT REMINDED ME ABOUT *CAPRA, *HEPBURN & *TRACY'S TERRIFIC (***1/2) "State of the Union"

 

He loved talking politics a lot, plus religion. When people could get him to open up

Sports as well

 

& another strong film from 2000 "Thirteen Days" ($36m.) It's staggering to me when many people noawadfsys actually think that entire 1962 crisis was just made up for the cinema???

 

Plus, a question on a pic that's never aired anymore & I thought it was strong medicine when I saw it on tv around 1979 or so  But, it's not truly a "political picture"

1977's "Twilight's Last Gleaming"  Who knows of it?

 

(TRIVIA/FUN-FACTS: Many know this one, but *Capra had always fully intended "Mr. Smith..."

to be a follow-up to his marvelous *Oscar winning: "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town" & w/*Cooper again.

Obviously things didn't pan out though  As in "Mr. Deeds Goes to Washington"

 

& on that note, what about his 1941 "Meet John Doe?"

 

AND, to some extent, a bona-fide comedy-drama I've loved since I was 15  "Being There" (l979)

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One of the most bizarre political films: GABRIEL OVER THE WHITE HOUSE, which is a fantasy about what a benevolent dictator (i.e., William Randolph Hearst) could do to fix what was wrong with the U.S. An end to prohibition, with national liquor stores, for one thing. TCM shows this from time to time, and it's worth seeing just to learn how Hearst wanted to change things. Also, to give thanks that we never had such a benevolent dictator.

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And one of my personal favorites, THE DARK HORSE with Warren William, Bette Davis and Guy Kibbee.

 

 

Like that one, too.  Loads of acid cynicism.  Truly refreshing.  Wish the ending could be better.

 

For other political movies:

 

The Farmer's Daughter (1947), with Loretta Young, and Joseph Cotten.

 

Washington Merry-Go-Round (1932), with Lee Tracy, and Constance Cummings.

 

Storm in a Teacup (1937) with Vivien Leigh, and Rex Harrison.

 

Z (1969), with Yves Montand, and Irene Pappas.

 

Wilson (1944) with Alexander Knox, and Geraldine Fitzgerald.

 

Politics (1931) with Marie Dressler.

 

The Last Hurrah (1959) with Spencer Tracy.

 

and how about Chinatown (1974) with--oh, you know.

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Like that one, too.  Loads of acid cynicism.  Truly refreshing.  Wish the ending could be better.

 

For other political movies:

 

The Farmer's Daughter (1947), with Loretta Young, and Joseph Cotten.

 

Washington Merry-Go-Round (1932), with Lee Tracy, and Constance Cummings.

 

Storm in a Teacup (1937) with Vivien Leigh, and Rex Harrison.

 

Z (1969), with Yves Montand, and Irene Pappas.

 

Wilson (1944) with Alexander Knox, and Geraldine Fitzgerald.

 

Politics (1931) with Marie Dressler.

 

The Last Hurrah (1959) with Spencer Tracy.

 

and how about Chinatown (1974) with--oh, you know.

Kinda' left out the superb "Fail-Safe" due to it being more of a political thriller

 

As is "M. Candidate"

 

 

& thesedays Woodrow Wilson is taking it on the chin, from his alleged racial items?

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& a few more I forgot (In no special order)

 

 "Young, Mr. Lincoln" (l939) (Fox)

 

 "Abe Lincoln in Illinois" (l940)

 

 "Jefferson in Paris" (l994)

 

 "Air Force 0ne" (l997) (& grossed $173m.)

 

"Amistad" (l997) ($44m.)

 

 & a few from the other side of the poilitical spectrum, but still strong filmmaking:

 

 "Downfall" (l994) (Germany)-(Bruno Ganz brilliant as Hitler, no matter what he was! & was truly "robbed" of at least a Best actor shot for his work)

 

 "Triumph of the Will" (l935) (Germany) & to some degree Leni Reifenstahl's "0lympia I and II" (l936)

 

 "The Bunker" (l980 tv movie w/*Hopkins again) & "Stalin" (l99l tv movie w/*Duvall)

 

& how could we forget one of thee great silent epic/bio's  "Napolean" (l927) (France)

 

& a lot better then the popular but dull 1954 "Desiree"

 

(P.S. There doesn't seem to be many, if any on Washington & Churchill for some reason?)

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   WOW! I negelected to also include one of Hollywoods most famous duds, especially back during it's "Studio-System Era"-(l925-l960)

 

*"The King: Clark Gable" (l90l-l960) in "Parnell" (l937) (M-G-M) (*1/2)

 

he was totally miscast as the Irish politician & refused to use an accent!  Even *Tracy used to tease him about the bio

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Don't forget "The Man," the 1972 political drama starring James Earl Jones as the first black POTUS. Based on the 1964 novel by Irving Wallace, the movie's screenplay was written by the great Rod Serling. President Obama's two terms as Commander-in-Chief have made the film a tad dated. Then again, Douglass Dilman, who becomes a non-elected president via a couple of shocking developments, becomes accustomed to dealing with obstructionist tactics. 

 

By the way, the film features the final big screen appearance of Jack Benny, who plays himself early on in the movie.

 

30BLACK-PREZ1-articleLarge.jpg

Jones as President Douglass Dilman

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Don't forget "The Man," the 1972 political drama starring James Earl Jones as the first black POTUS. Based on the 1964 novel by Irving Wallace, the movie's screenplay was written by the great Rod Serling. President Obama's two terms as Commander-in-Chief have made the film a tad dated. Then again, Douglass Dilman, who becomes a non-elected president via a couple of shocking developments, becomes accustomed to dealing with obstructionist tactics. 

 

By the way, the film features the final big screen appearance of Jack Benny, who plays himself early on in the movie.

 

30BLACK-PREZ1-articleLarge.jpg

Jones as President Douglass Dilman

 

I had no idea that this had been made into a feature.  I read the book once upon a time.

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Don't forget "The Man," the 1972 political drama starring James Earl Jones as the first black POTUS

 

Good one.

 

Here's more:

 

The Parallax View (1974) with Warren Beatty, and Paula Prentiss.

 

JFK (1991) with Kevin Kostner, and Tommy Lee Jones.

 

Election (1999), with Reese Witherspoon, and Mathew Broderick.

 

Executive Action (1973) with Burt Lancaster, and Robert Ryan.

 

Tennessee Johnson (1942), with Van Johnson, and Ruth Hussey.

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I had no idea that this had been made into a feature.  I read the book once upon a time.

 

It was intended to be a made-for-television production, but the Powers That Be at Paramount elevated it to feature film status late in the game. James Earl Jones said he regretted that it was never given a feature film budget.

 

The director was the distinguished filmmaker Joseph Sargent, whose big-screen credits included "The Taking of Pelham One, Two, Three" (1974) and "MacArthur" (1977). Jones' supporting cast included Martin Balsam, William Windom, Burgess Meredith, Lew Ayres, Barbara Rush, Georg Stanford Brown and Janet MacLachlan.

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My favorite was "All the King's Men" about despot Huey Long of Louisiana, and then when the title was appropriated for "All the President's Men" it became a favorite too. I think the combining of political intrigue along with the mystery element that they put in the movie made it one of the best.

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It was intended to be a made-for-television production, but the Powers That Be at Paramount elevated it to feature film status late in the game. James Earl Jones said he regretted that it was never given a feature film budget.

 

The director was the distinguished filmmaker Joseph Sargent, whose big-screen credits included "The Taking of Pelham One, Two, Three" (1974) and "MacArthur" (1977). Jones' supporting cast included Martin Balsam, William Windom, Burgess Meredith, Lew Ayres, Barbara Rush, Georg Stanford Brown and Janet MacLachlan.

Tell you the truth, I seem to recall it WAS a "made-for-TV" feature.

 

At least it's how I recall ever seeing it!  But latey, my memory has gotten so jenky, I wouldn't rely on it.

 

But I DO honestly recall it being a fairly good movie.

 

Robert Redford's THE CANDIDATE is one of my favorite political flicks.

 

All of my other favorites have already been mentioned.  :)

 

Sepiatone

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I really like "The Ides of March" (2011), which stars George Clooney as a Democratic candidate for president and Ryan Gosling as the junior campaign manager who gets a first-hand education about modern-day politics. The late Philip Seymour Hoffman had a nice role as the pragmatic campaign manager.

 

Clooney received an Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay (shared with Beau Willimon, and Grant Heslov). It was one of the actor-filmmaker's unparalleled eight career nominations in six different categories. The film was based on Willimon's play "Farragut North."

 

Also appearing in the movie: Marisa Tomei, Paul Giamatti, Evan Rachel Wood and Jeffrey Wright, 

 

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Hi, Spence. This GregoryPeckfan, now going under the name of Columbo.

 

Gregory Peck was in more than one political film;

 

The Chairman is likely the one you are thinking about, although in Arabesque he and Sophia Loren were trying to stop an assassination as well.

 

My favourite political movies, regardless of whether or not they have already been mentioned;

 

All the President's Men

The Best Man

Abe Lincoln in Illinois

Three Days of the Condor (based upon a book called Six Days of the Condor)

Seven Days in May

Dr. Strangelove

Fail Safe

Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

The Manchurian Candidate (original)

A Face in the Crowd

Day of the Jaekal

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I knew there were a lot many, but wanted to also let others throw in own pix/candidate's & I, actually forgot many too? Cool someone posted the terrific little "Election" (***1/2) I always watch it, due to that lil' dynamo *Reese!

 

Is "Missing" a political film? Or *Attenborough's 1987 "Cry Freedom?" Sometimes there's a fine line of course & just now, well, last night very late recalled a couple, but 4-got to jot 'em down on paper-(i.e. cliff notes)

 

THANX AGAIN!

 

& this is a lot more fun & interesting then this current "Election"/"Debacle!"

 

 

& here are more: "Blaze" (l989) (***) & *Cagney made just an ok (**1/2) film called "A Lion is in the Streets"-(P.S. But, do we also count Irish politics too? I cited a few International political one's

If so, where to even begin w/"My Island?" "Gangs of New York" (2002) ($80m.), "In the Name of the Father" (l993) ($25m.), "Michael Collins"-(not "Clayton) for starters

 

& *Duvall-(along w/*Hopkins & *Steiger probably has portrayed more historical figures than anyone

Also played: "Eichmann" & "Ike" for tv.

 

& of course in many ways "The Greatest film Ever Made" in "Citizen Kane!"

 

& if we go waaay back, how about "Julius Caesar?" (l953) (M-G-M)

 

As another added "Fail-Safe' was an extraordinary picture, sadly released at same time of "Dr. Strangelove"

 

 

& again, to others, why so little has been covered on the big screen for "Washington" "Jefferson"-(NOTE: Paul Giamatti did a tv mini-series on "John Adams") Teddy Roosevelt & others, most of all my A No. 1 of 'em all: Winston Churchill-(l874-l965) *Hopkins played him in '72's "Young, Winston' but what else?

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There's also...

 

A Fever in the Blood

 

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance

 

The Glass Key

 

The Great Man Votes

 

The Mob (1956)

(TRIVIA: "The Glass Key" was reportedly not only Raymond Chandler's-(l888-l959) own favorite of his novels & was Akira Kurosawa's inspiration for his own "Yokimbo" & overall fav. film as well

 

(MORE TRIVIA: Still located in mid Hollywood is "Raymond Chandler Square' where pts of "The Big Sleep" (l9460 were shot for outside images) now of course a somewhat dangerous area for tourists'

 

Located I think at Hollywood, Blvd & Cahuenga" But, I looked all over-(it's mainly a tall office bldg.)

& really couldn't find it?

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I really like "The Ides of March" (2011), which stars George Clooney as a Democratic candidate for president and Ryan Gosling as the junior campaign manager who gets a first-hand education about modern-day politics. The late Philip Seymour Hoffman had a nice role as the pragmatic campaign manager.

 

Clooney received an Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay (shared with Beau Willimon, and Grant Heslov). It was one of the actor-filmmaker's unparalleled eight career nominations in six different categories. The film was based on Willimon's play "Farragut North."

 

Also appearing in the movie: Marisa Tomei, Paul Giamatti, Evan Rachel Wood and Jeffrey Wright, 

 

 

Jake, I also liked THE IDES OF MARCH very much. It felt very much like a film by Zinnemann or Preminger, and I intend that as a high compliment.

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Tell you the truth, I seem to recall it WAS a "made-for-TV" feature.

 

At least it's how I recall ever seeing it!  But latey, my memory has gotten so jenky, I wouldn't rely on it.

 

But I DO honestly recall it being a fairly good movie.

 

Robert Redford's THE CANDIDATE is one of my favorite political flicks.

 

All of my other favorites have already been mentioned.  :)

 

He also helmed *Cagney-(along w pal of his *Art (Ed Norton) Carney & Ellen Barkin) in his true final film "Terrible Joe Moran" (l984 tv movie) (***)

 

Sepiatone

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& a few more I forgot (In no special order)

 

 "Young, Mr. Lincoln" (l939) (Fox)

 

 "Abe Lincoln in Illinois" (l940)

 

 "Jefferson in Paris" (l994)

 

 "Air Force 0ne" (l997) (& grossed $173m.)

 

"Amistad" (l997) ($44m.)

 

 

 

*George C. Scott-(l926-99) also portrayed Mussolini in a mid 1980's tv movie

 

And, how culd we forget, "The Great Dictator" (UA) with "Cinemas All-Time, All-Around Comedic Genius: *Charles (Spencer) Chaplin-(l889-l977) & Jack 0akie-(l903-78)-(used to know a lady that knew him when she was very young & had photos,etc) Oakie was known to be deaf. Both garnered *Oscar shots for the comedy-(filmed at his own little "Dream Factory" & still-standing on LaBrea) However, I agree w/*Woody Allen-(a huge fan of his) in that the final speech took away from the rest of the picture (***1/2)instead of 4

Officially it was the oinly Best actor nom he ever received-(SEE 1927-28) & *Chaplin refused the New York Film Critics Awards for it?

 

 & a few from the other side of the poilitical spectrum, but still strong filmmaking:

 

 "Downfall" (l994) (Germany)

 

 "Triumph of the Will" (l935) (Germany)

 

 "The Bunker" (l980 tv movie w/*Hopkins again) & "Stalin" (l99l tv movie w/*Duvall)

 

& how could we forget one of thee great silent epic/bio's  "Napolean" (l927) (France)

 

& a lot better then the popular but dull 1954 "Desiree"

 

(P.S. There doesn't seem to be many, if any on Washington & Churchill for some reason?)

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 my A No. 1 of 'em all: Winston Churchill-(l874-l965) *Hopkins played him in '72's "Young, Winston' but what else?

 

The star of Sir Richard Attenborough's "Young Churchill" was Simon Ward, who played the future British prime minister up to the age of 26. Churchill's parents were portrayed by Robert Shaw and Anne Bancroft.

 

Simon-Ward-Young-W_2284348b.jpg

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