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RESTORED UNIVERSALS AT M.O.M.A.


PrinceSaliano
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I wonder if TCM programmers can have access to any of these restorations in the future. They have celebrated M.O.M.A. in the past.

 

The Last Warning is one of my favourite silent chillers, with mesmerizing camerawork, the equal in many ways of Leni's Cat and the Canary..

 

East of Borneo is a hoot as a jungle adventure, complete with a sadistic ruler of a jungle kingdom condemning natives to out swim a river full of crocodiles.

 

Law and Order is an interesting, austere western, with a handle bar moutached Walter Huston dressed in black and playing a character supposedly based on Wyatt Earp (the former lawman having frequented Hollywood a lot in his final years and having passed away three years before this film was made)..

 

 

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Thanks both of you for posting this info.  Coincidentally, I see that TCM has a MoMA double feature on May 22, with To the Last Man (1933) and Of Stars and Men (1961) currently scheduled.  In the Now Playing guide the first film was originally listed as Wild Girl (1932), so there apparently has been a change in the plans...

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Thanks both of you for posting this info.  Coincidentally, I see that TCM has a MoMA double feature on May 22, with To the Last Man (1933) and Of Stars and Men (1961) currently scheduled.  In the Now Playing guide the first film was originally listed as Wild Girl (1932), so there apparently has been a change in the plans...

 

If that's the case, I'm very sorry to hear it. Wild Girl is very rare, and one of two films I was particularly interested in seeing on TCM next month.

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I wonder if TCM programmers can have access to any of these restorations in the future. They have celebrated M.O.M.A. in the past.

 

The Last Warning is one of my favourite silent chillers, with mesmerizing camerawork, the equal in many ways of Leni's Cat and the Canary..

 

East of Borneo is a hoot as a jungle adventure, complete with a sadistic ruler of a jungle kingdom condemning natives to out swim a river full of crocodiles.

 

Law and Order is an interesting, austere western, with a handle bar moutached Walter Huston dressed in black and playing a character supposedly based on Wyatt Earp (the former lawman having frequented Hollywood a lot in his final years and having passed away three years before this film was made)..

I hope TCM will make every effort to get these rare titles shown.

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Thanks both of you for posting this info.  Coincidentally, I see that TCM has a MoMA double feature on May 22, with To the Last Man (1933) and Of Stars and Men (1961) currently scheduled.  In the Now Playing guide the first film was originally listed as Wild Girl (1932), so there apparently has been a change in the plans...

 

This is very disappointing. The only two films I was excited to see on May's roster were "Music In The Air" and "Wild Girl". Both are Fox film rarities. I'm bumbed out.

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I wonder if TCM programmers can have access to any of these restorations in the future. They have celebrated M.O.M.A. in the past.

 

The Last Warning is one of my favourite silent chillers, with mesmerizing camerawork, the equal in many ways of Leni's Cat and the Canary..

 

East of Borneo is a hoot as a jungle adventure, complete with a sadistic ruler of a jungle kingdom condemning natives to out swim a river full of crocodiles.

 

Law and Order is an interesting, austere western, with a handle bar moutached Walter Huston dressed in black and playing a character supposedly based on Wyatt Earp (the former lawman having frequented Hollywood a lot in his final years and having passed away three years before this film was made)..

 

For those interested, there are prints available of all three of these films now on You Tube.

 

Looking at those offered of East of Borneo (really badly washed out, unfortunately)and Law and Order, it's all the more reason to want to see the restorations.

 

The tinted print of The Last Warning, however, is the best that I have seen of this film., And, crucial to any silent film, particularly an old fashioned thriller like this one, it has GREAT musical accompaniment.

 

The Last Warning, by the way, is one of many Universal films to effectively use the old Phantom of the Opera theatre set from the Lon Chaney film.. Assuming that the M.O.M.A. restoration is hard to get a hold of, this may well be the best game in town to see this really fun flick. Highly recommended for people into old house (in this case, theatre set) thrillers.

 

the-last-warning-1929.jpg

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"East of Borneo" is an incredible film and made all the more incredible since it was one of the sources for the wild and wacky short made by naive artist, Joseph Cornell called "Rose Hobart".

 

Cornell, noted for his boxes, had an obsession with Rose Hobart and contrived to put shots and footage of her from many movies all into one movie, so he could just concentrate on her image. It is a bit like a friend of mine who wanted to put all the murder scenes in "The Godfather" together in one taped sequence. Of course he was not a famous artist so people just thought he was weird or bloodthirsty.

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Is  'M.O.M.A.'  the Museum of Modern Art in NYC? 

 

     What would even be the point of restoring 'THE LAST WARNING' if no one is able to see it?  All that work to fix the film up . . . and it's never shown.  What?!

 

    Would a person have to go to New York City and schedule a viewing appointment to see it?  Or maybe, for convenience sake, an interested party could call MoMA or e-mail them to schedule a showing . . . ?

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Is  'M.O.M.A.'  the Museum of Modern Art in NYC? 

 

     What would even be the point of restoring 'THE LAST WARNING' if no one is able to see it?  All that work to fix the film up . . . and it's never shown.  What?!

 

    Would a person have to go to New York City and schedule a viewing appointment to see it?  Or maybe, for convenience sake, an interested party could call MoMA or e-mail them to schedule a showing . . . ?

I posted the schedule.

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I took a look at the schedule.  I hope at some time at least a few of those titles can be seen without having to journey to NYC.  I'd not object to watching any movie at the MoMA, but it's not likely at the present time of me going anywhere on a vacation.   

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Law and Order is an interesting, austere western, with a handle bar moutached Walter Huston

 

Huston is facially hairless in Law And Order.

 

DUJ0h50.jpg

 

You may be confusing Huston in L & O with his Trampas in The Virginian

 

CY8JZ7h.jpg

 

L & O is one of the best early sound westerns, with some great tracking shots and innovative editing in the climactic shootout (in a barn, not a corral). The film also has a tough attitude seldom seen in pre-'60s westerns, especially re a subplot concerning a hanging.

 

dressed in black and playing a character supposedly based on Wyatt Earp (the former lawman having frequented Hollywood a lot in his final years and having passed away three years before this film was made)

 

Earp spent most of the ''20s in L.A. trying to sell his story to Hollywood. There was just one problem -- at that time he almost completely forgotten, and the Gunfight At The OK Corral was an obscure historical footnote. It was not until the 1931 publication of Lake's semi-fictional bio Frontier Marshal -- oft filmed by Fox -- that Earp became a historical celebrity. Unfortunately he'd died in 1929.

 

After the Earp revival a number of H'wood big shots such as John Ford would claim to have known Earp. How true these claims are I don't know.

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Well. come on now, Richard, I already confessed to my 'stache memory error regarding Huston earlier in the thread.

 

But, yes, you're right, it was his appearance in The Virginian that I confused with Law and Order when I typed up my first posting here.

 

Huston didn't appear in many westerns in his career, but he's certainly effective in these two and would end his career with the greatest performance of them all in yet another, The Furies, though this time as an almost monarchical landlord, rather than a gunslinger.

 

As for Wyatt Earp, he would die in Los Angeles in 1929, one report I read saying that Tom Mix wept openly at his funeral.

 

wyatt-earp.jpg?w=547

 

Earp8.jpg

 

Earp pallbearers at his funeral, including William S. Hart and Tom Mix, far right.

 

Mix, by the way, is the star of one of the MoMA restorations, Destry Rides Again. Apparently it doesn't have much in common with the Jimmy Stewart version, outside of the title.

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Thanks both of you for posting this info.  Coincidentally, I see that TCM has a MoMA double feature on May 22, with To the Last Man (1933) and Of Stars and Men (1961) currently scheduled.  In the Now Playing guide the first film was originally listed as Wild Girl (1932), so there apparently has been a change in the plans...

 

That sort of scares me in a way. TO THE LAST MAN is a decent, early Randolph Scott western with an excellent cast including an unbilled Shirley Temple. But it's also the kind of film that since it's public domain, is out there with terrible prints on scores of different labels. I'll try to remain hopeful, but I can't see Universal putting the money into restoring it.

 

This was is sort of personal to me - as a little kid, I used to think that Scott and Buster Crabbe looked like brothers. A few years later I learned that they made this one and were cast as brothers but it took me decades to catch up to it. I'm a Scott collector, I would sure like to see a nice copy of this one as the ones that I own are substandard.

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Well. come on now, Richard, I already confessed to my 'stache memory error regarding Huston earlier in the thread.

 

Sorry about that, I must have missed it. I HATE this format of reading posts backwards. Have they ever added a way to change it?

 

As for Wyatt Earp, he would die in Los Angeles in 1929, one report I read saying that Tom Mix wept openly at his funeral.

 

Earp8.jpg

 

Earp pallbearers at his funeral, including William S. Hart and Tom Mix, far right.

 

I just looked up the list of Earp's pallbearers. One was John Clum, the editor of the Tombstone Epitaph who figures in several OK Corral films and was portrayed by Audie Murphy in Walk The Proud Land.

 

But the really intriguing one was Wilson Mizner, the colorful wit ("Hollywood is a trip through a sewer in a glass bottom boat") who became a screenwriter in his last years. I was unaware that Mizner and Earp had known each other during the Yukon gold rush. I keep waiting for somebody to make a movie about Mizner's life (Stephen Sondheim wrote a musical about Wilson and his brother, the celebrated architect Addison Mizner, but it never reached Broadway so I guess it doesn't count).

 

Is this the official pallbearer photo? The only one that could be Mizner is the bald guy next to Mix.

 

Here are some other pictures of Mizner for comparison:

 

WFggeVr.jpg

 

rDeNyHq.jpg

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Just to let you know, I sent an email to Charlie Tabesh, of TCM programming, asking if he could look into the possiblity of gaining broadcast rights to THE LAST WARNING.

 

He very graciously got back to me very quickly to say that he would be pleased to look into the matter. He added, however, that since the film is a silent they would have to acquire a musical soundtrack to go with it, which would add to both the time and costs involved.

 

No guarantees of any kind here, of course, but, at least, Mr. Tabesh said he would look into the matter. That's something, at least.

 

 

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Just to let you know, I sent an email to Charlie Tabesh, of TCM programming, asking if he could look into the possiblity of gaining broadcast rights to THE LAST WARNING.

 

He very graciously got back to me very quickly to say that he would be pleased to look into the matter. He added, however, that since the film is a silent they would have to acquire a musical soundtrack to go with it, which would add to both the time and costs involved.

 

No guarantees of any kind here, of course, but, at least, Mr. Tabesh said he would look into the matter. That's something, at least.

 

I wish that he would look into the Frenchman's Creek situation. One poster said that he already knows but knowing and doing something about it are two different things. Between here and the web site there have been plenty of comments but not a peep from any spokesperson.

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