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I Saw A Deadhead Sticker on a Cadillac-- Don't Look Back


Princess of Tap
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I AM Fra, and you're not..........I love "Twelve Thirty" and "California Dreamin", but aside from them, there's not much else I like by them. The Spoonful are better. Spanky and Our Gang are much better.

John Sebastian was such a consistent songwriter; people don't give the Spoonful enough credit for some solid hits that they had. And they weren't that light--

 

I think, " Hot town summer in the city back of my neck getting dirty and gritty bend down isn't it a pity--Doesn't seem to be a shadow in the city--

 

all around people looking half dead, walking on the sidewalk hotter than a match head"-- is a great song-- perfect little record.

 

Summer in the City is as good as what anyone else wss putting out in the mid-sixties. The lyrics match the music, the arrangement is a smash and I love the city sounds. There's nothing weak or light about this song.

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Thanks for the correct title of Happy Xmas (War is Over).  Much appreciated.

You're welcome. I can understand the confusion

because this song often shows up under a number

of different titles in various places.

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John Sebastian was such a consistent songwriter; people don't give the Spoonful enough credit for some solid hits that they had. And they weren't that light--

 

I think, " Hot town summer in the city back of my neck getting dirty and gritty bend down isn't it a pity--Doesn't seem to be a shadow in the city--

 

all around people looking half dead, walking on the sidewalk hotter than a match head"-- is a great song-- perfect little record.

 

Summer in the City is as good as what anyone else wss putting out in the mid-sixties. The lyrics match the music, the arrangement is a smash and I love the city sounds. There's nothing weak or light about this song.

 

I've performed this song live as a solo acoustic guitarist many times and it always ends well with much applause. I had to rewrite sections to accommodate my a cappella vocal substituting for the guitar notes and piano during those "city sounds". I also copped the intro from The Yardbirds' For Your Love - added a little bit of that just before the regular intro.

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John Sebastian was such a consistent songwriter; people don't give the Spoonful enough credit for some solid hits that they had. And they weren't that light--

 

I think, " Hot town summer in the city back of my neck getting dirty and gritty bend down isn't it a pity--Doesn't seem to be a shadow in the city--

 

all around people looking half dead, walking on the sidewalk hotter than a match head"-- is a great song-- perfect little record.

 

Summer in the City is as good as what anyone else wss putting out in the mid-sixties. The lyrics match the music, the arrangement is a smash and I love the city sounds. There's nothing weak or light about this song.

The line that the Spoonful are best known for is, "It's like trying to tell a stranger about rock and roll".

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I've performed this song live as a solo acoustic guitarist many times and it always ends well with much applause. I had to rewrite sections to accommodate my a cappella vocal substituting for the guitar notes and piano during those "city sounds". I also copped the intro from The Yardbirds' For Your Love - added a little bit of that just before the regular intro.

 

DAYDREAM is a much better solo acoustic guitar presentation piece(if you're gonna do Sebastian/Spoonful tunes)

 

I don't perform professionally, but I got good response from people at gatherings and such.  In SPITE of my "singing"  :lol:

 

Getting regrettably back to my long winded personal history with music:  

 

 

I wonder how many of you out there (and according to region) had cases of "Local band makes good", or BANDS in some cases.

 

Of course here in Detroit we WERE all proud of the NATIONAL fame and accolades our MOTOWN artists received.  But we had a LOT of "homegrown" artists who many thought were "great", but maybe only a couple snuck out beyong what we referred to as the "tri-state" area---(Michigan, Ohio and Indiana)  And NOT just "local" meaning only Detroit, but from Michigan.

 

GRAND FUNK RAILROAD is the only Michigan rock group I know for sure got notice nationwide.  I'm NOT sure of.....

 

FROST.  in fact, founder and lead guitarist DICK WAGNER shortly wound up in ALICE COOPER'S band, and THEN captured a lot of nationwide attenton.  But that band(Frost) KICKED AZZ!

 

THE AMBOY DUKES--now, we aspiring guitar players 'round here considered TED UGENT to be a "guitar hero" LONG before he went solo and started doing his "Wango Tango" stuff, and started going off the deep end politically and socially.  But I don't know if anybody outside that "tri-state" area heard of the DUKES before Ted went solo.  Or how widespread their only radio hit "Journey To The Center Of Your Mind"  ever got.

 

A very popular local Detroit band in the '60's was THE DETROIT VIBRATIONS, who didn't really get any record deal, or get HEARD of by a lot of people until they changed their name to FRIJID PINK in '69 and released a psychedelic inspired cover of "House Of The Rising Sun"

 

I don't know if many outside of the Detroit area ever heard of them.  Lemme know, willya?

 

Other good local bands were SAVAGE GRACE, who did release an LP, but still, I have no idea if they ever got attention outside of Detroit.  Same with THE PSYCHEDELIC STOOGES, who had, as their frontman, the enigmatic, total nutjob most of you NOW know as IGGY POP.  Back "in the day" we just called him "Iggy"  or maybe "Iggy Stooge".

 

BOB SEGER, who just turned 71 yesterday( Fri.  5/6 ) had been a local favorite since 1966, but I think it wasn't until about the mid '70's that the rest of the country caught up.  WIKI claims he was born here in MY hometown(Lincoln Park, MI) but I really don't know if Wiki got it right, or what.  WE like to think it true, as there's what we here in L.P. laughingly think of as a sardonic line in the tune "Back In '72"  when he sings, "We all got homesick for Lincoln Park!"  then sneeringly says, "Imagine!"

 

And still more local bands that may or may not have got attention outside the state were:  SRC( Scott Richard Case, who also did a version of "I'm So Glad") THE RATIONALS( who did good locally with their whitebread cover of Otis Redding's "Respect", and did VERY good 'round here before Aretha put out HER version!)

 

And to continue my unwanted chronology, it was Feb. of '68 that I attended my first rock concert----JIMI HENDRIX at Detroit's Masonic Auditorium.  On the same bill was:

 

THE MC5,

 

a group called THYME

and

SOFT MACHINE

 

And all for $4.00!

 

Now, Princess On Tap also informed me the intent was referrences to what's called "Classic Rock", which is really an ambiguous term.  "classic" in this case can take on (for some) the same number of different definitions the word takes on when discussing MOVIES in here.  I'VE long snarked that "classic rock" was nothing more than a nice way to say "oldies"!  But, to whit---

 

The "classic rock" station in these parts( WCXS) generally intended to concentrate on that music that was born out of the early "underground"  FM radio stations of the late '60's, and into the period when FM station's formats were called AOR( album oriented rock), which covers up to the later '70's.  But, THAT was in 1987, when the station changed it's call letters from WHNI, which was an "easy listening" station. (and cutely called "Honey radio")

 

Today, even our long time "oldies" station, WOMC, that originally played just about any thing going back to the mid '50's, is recently featuring many of those tunes which were heard on all those VIDEOS seen on MTV in the early to mid '80's, and the only station up until his death where ANY Prince tunes could be heard.  And adding insult to injury, this "oldies" station goes no further back than late '70's DISCO!  :huh:

 

Sepiatone

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Sepia--

 

I think it's a matter of demographics. You can draw in a more diverse and younger group of people with the seventies and eighties, then you're going to get with the fifties and the sixties.

 

I call it The Brady Bunch phenomenon. There was some good actors and actresses on that show, but in general the show was very mediocre. It just comes at the best possible time to draw in several generations of viewerd. So it's become an iconic legendary sitcom, when it's really just a mediocre piece of entertainment.

 

I recently I had a serious talk with our oldies station when they were broadcasting at my gym. Naturally I discussed Brian Wilson and The Beach Boys, The Bee Gees, The Beatles excetera.

 

They're getting a little bit better about this situation. Because they have had complaints. Now we get wouldn't it be nice or Good Vibrations-- that's it.

 

When I heard a Michael Jackson song on the radio several years ago. I knew something horrible had happened to him because they would never play him.

 

Tell me is it just me or do they play CCR so much that I almost don't like them anymore?

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Sepia, I knew of the Amboy Dukes and that song. I've never heard the Stooges referred to as the Psychedelic Stooges, but after looking it up, that was the name when they first started gigging in the Michigan area. Learn something new every day. I don't know most of the others you mention, like Detroit Vibrations or Frost.

 

 

 

We don't have any bands from my small town, although one kid from here went on to play guitar in a modestly successful hard rock band in the early 00's (Shinedown). They had a platinum album.

 

My town is near both Gainesville and Jacksonville, so we tend to look on bands from those 2 cities as "homegrown". Gainesville produced Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Stephen Stills, 2 of the Eagles, and the Motels. Jacksonville produced Allman Brothers Band, Lynyrd Skynyrd, .38 Special, Molly Hatchet, Blackfoot, and the unfortunate Limp Bizkit.

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Sepia:

 

From my city, we have several people who have gone on to be professional musicians - not in Rock and Roll, however. Most of the ones I know are in classical music and perform opera or concertos all over the world.

 

We have some First Nations (Native Canadians) who are very popular musicians as well.

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Sepia--

 

I think it's a matter of demographics. You can draw in a more diverse and younger group of people with the seventies and eighties, then you're going to get with the fifties and the sixties.

 

I call it The Brady Bunch phenomenon. There was some good actors and actresses on that show, but in general the show was very mediocre. It just comes at the best possible time to draw in several generations of viewerd. So it's become an iconic legendary sitcom, when it's really just a mediocre piece of entertainment.

 

I recently I had a serious talk with our oldies station when they were broadcasting at my gym. Naturally I discussed Brian Wilson and The Beach Boys, The Bee Gees, The Beatles excetera.

 

They're getting a little bit better about this situation. Because they have had complaints. Now we get wouldn't it be nice or Good Vibrations-- that's it.

 

When I heard a Michael Jackson song on the radio several years ago. I knew something horrible had happened to him because they would never play him.

 

Tell me is it just me or do they play CCR so much that I almost don't like them anymore?

The current classic rock stations on FM, and even Sirius Classic Vinyl and Classic Rewind, tend to play only the album tracks that were released as singles, rather than the "deep tracks", which often tend to be the best tracks by various artists. 

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Columbia....

 

I know not EVERY city or state gave huge contribution to rock music nationwide, but some were extremely loved by the denizens of that city or area, and I was wondering how many other towns cold make those claims.  But you reminded me that CANADA has also contributed MIGHTILY to the  field of "Classic Rock" with groups and artists like THE GUESS WHO,  JONI MITCHELL. CHILIWACK(sic), MAHOGANY RUSH, Bachman-TURNER OVERDRIVE and MANDALA (which a local Detroit DJ loved and played often, but called the THE GREAT MANDALA).  At the time( 1968) I couldn't find any MANDALA stuff around my neck, and am now looking to see if my daughter can find me some through her "share-ware" connections.  I remember liking very much what that DJ played when he got the chance.

 

Plus probably many more I regrettably never got opportunity to hear, or also sadly never got enough airplay down here.

 

Sepiatone

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Columbia....

 

I know not EVERY city or state gave huge contribution to rock music nationwide, but some were extremely loved by the denizens of that city or area, and I was wondering how many other towns cold make those claims.  But you reminded me that CANADA has also contributed MIGHTILY to the  field of "Classic Rock" with groups and artists like THE GUESS WHO,  JONI MITCHELL. CHILIWACK(sic), MAHOGANY RUSH, Bachman-TURNER OVERDRIVE and MANDALA (which a local Detroit DJ loved and played often, but called the THE GREAT MANDALA).  At the time( 1968) I couldn't find any MANDALA stuff around my neck, and am now looking to see if my daughter can find me some through her "share-ware" connections.  I remember liking very much what that DJ played when he got the chance.

 

Plus probably many more I regrettably never got opportunity to hear, or also sadly never got enough airplay down here.

 

Sepiatone

 

Rush is the greatest Canadian rock group, imo. Neil Young is my favorite Canadian individual artist. The Band is mostly Canadian, as well.

 

Other Canadians include Bryan Adams, Leonard Cohen, Gordon Lightfoot.

 

Skinny Puppy is my favorite newer Canadian group, although they are over 30 years old now!

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Rush is the greatest Canadian rock group, imo. Neil Young is my favorite Canadian individual artist. The Band is mostly Canadian, as well.

 

Other Canadians include Bryan Adams, Leonard Cohen, Gordon Lightfoot.

 

Skinny Puppy is my favorite newer Canadian group, although they are over 30 years old now!

Don't forget about Loverboy, which IMO was better than Rush. So was BTO and Guess Who.

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Don't forget about Loverboy, which IMO was better than Rush. So was BTO and Guess Who.

 

Crazy talk.

 

No, I get it. Rush is an acquired taste, one that most people don't acquire. It's nerd music. And that voice!

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Don't forget about Loverboy, which IMO was better than Rush. So was BTO and Guess Who.

 

I love Gordon Lightfoot! If you could read my mind was a fabulous number.

I also like that off the wall number he did about the ship going down.

 

He's a completely authentic artist- - he doesn't need anything except his voice and that acoustic guitar. I have great respect for that.

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Crazy talk.

 

No, I get it. Rush is an acquired taste, one that most people don't acquire. It's nerd music. And that voice!

Rush isn't so bad, but I think of them more with a personal nostalgia. I don't have their stuff on my iPod.

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I love Gordon Lightfoot! If you could read my mind was a fabulous number.

I also like that off the wall number he did about the ship going down.

"The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald" is my favorite song by him. A couple of years ago I stumbled across the Michigan church he refers to, totally by accident. There's a plaque there that talks about the song. It was cool.

 

(Edit: "Sundown" is another favorite.)

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Sepia:

 

From my city, we have several people who have gone on to be professional musicians - not in Rock and Roll, however. Most of the ones I know are in classical music and perform opera or concertos all over the world.

 

We have some First Nations (Native Canadians) who are very popular musicians as well.

In France I really liked a Canadian singer, or should I say quebecois,

Daniel Lavoie. He had a big hit with IL S'Aiment. Do you know this song or the singer?

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In France I really liked a Canadian singer, or should I say quebecois,

Daniel Lavoie. He had a big hit with IL S'Aiment. Do you know this song or the singer?

I know the song, but I don't think I know any other song by Daniel Lavoie.  It is a very popular song.

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Columbia....

 

I know not EVERY city or state gave huge contribution to rock music nationwide, but some were extremely loved by the denizens of that city or area, and I was wondering how many other towns cold make those claims.  But you reminded me that CANADA has also contributed MIGHTILY to the  field of "Classic Rock" with groups and artists like THE GUESS WHO,  JONI MITCHELL. CHILIWACK(sic), MAHOGANY RUSH, Bachman-TURNER OVERDRIVE and MANDALA (which a local Detroit DJ loved and played often, but called the THE GREAT MANDALA).  At the time( 1968) I couldn't find any MANDALA stuff around my neck, and am now looking to see if my daughter can find me some through her "share-ware" connections.  I remember liking very much what that DJ played when he got the chance.

 

Plus probably many more I regrettably never got opportunity to hear, or also sadly never got enough airplay down here.

 

Sepiatone

Chilliwack....Interesting  but Chilliwack are not *from* Chilliwack - where I live. 

 

I did not know there would be so many posts about Canadian music while I was offline, so  here are my comments about Canadian bands/musicians:

 

 

My favourite all time soloist is Gordon Lightfoot: top 2:

 

Sundown

If You Could Read My Mind

 

 

I love Neil Young; The Guess Who; most members of The Band are Canadian; Leonard Cohan; Bryan Adams.

 

I am not a fan of The Biebs or Celine Dion.

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Columbia....

 

I know not EVERY city or state gave huge contribution to rock music nationwide, but some were extremely loved by the denizens of that city or area, and I was wondering how many other towns cold make those claims.  But you reminded me that CANADA has also contributed MIGHTILY to the  field of "Classic Rock" with groups and artists like THE GUESS WHO,  JONI MITCHELL. CHILIWACK(sic), MAHOGANY RUSH, Bachman-TURNER OVERDRIVE and MANDALA (which a local Detroit DJ loved and played often, but called the THE GREAT MANDALA).  At the time( 1968) I couldn't find any MANDALA stuff around my neck, and am now looking to see if my daughter can find me some through her "share-ware" connections.  I remember liking very much what that DJ played when he got the chance.

 

Plus probably many more I regrettably never got opportunity to hear, or also sadly never got enough airplay down here.

 

Sepiatone

Columbia/Columbo -same thing.

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A very brief re-visit to our talk on the Rolling Stones:  I forgot to mention another song I love by them, "Ain't Too Proud To Beg."  I'm at Starbucks listening to it on You Tube right now.  Resisting the urge to totally rock out, here in a public place... ;)

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