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I Saw A Deadhead Sticker on a Cadillac-- Don't Look Back


Princess of Tap
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Then what 70's bands do you think should be listed? That's why I put forth the question. And if you list several, try to denote which would be your #1.

I would suggest the Velvet Underground and Roxy Music, forerunners of New Wave, the Police or Talking Heads, both of which came around near the end of the decade as the first successful New Wave bands, or, in a more traditional vein, the Eagles and Fleetwood Mac, or even Steely Dan..

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I would suggest the Velvet Underground and Roxy Music, forerunners of New Wave, the Police or Talking Heads, both of which came around near the end of the decade as the first successful New Wave bands, or, in a more traditional vein, the Eagles and Fleetwood Mac, or even Steely Dan..

 You list many that I like here. Velvet Underground is more of a 60's band, since 3 of their 5 albums were released that decade. The Police I see as more of an 80's band. Talking Heads are one of my all-time favorites, and I can't fault their inclusion. The Eagles and Fleetwood Mac sold absurd amounts of records. They each have some good songs, but they have long been a punchline among many music-lovers for their middle-of-the-road banality (Full disclosure: I have albums by both). And as for Steely Dan, I already mentioned that I could never get into them, but I know they have their fans.

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 You list many that I like here. Velvet Underground is more of a 60's band, since 3 of their 5 albums were released that decade. The Police I see as more of an 80's band. Talking Heads are one of my all-time favorites, and I can't fault their inclusion. The Eagles and Fleetwood Mac absurd amounts of records. They each have some good songs, but they have long been a punchline among many music-lovers for their middle-of-the-road banality (Full disclosure: I have albums by both). And as for Steely Dan, I already mentioned that I could never get into them, but I know they have their fans.

Roxy Music's "Love is the Drug" is what I consider the first new wave record. You could even cite the Sex Pistols as the band that started the whole punk/ new wave explosion. 

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Love'em, hate 'em or indifferent, unless I've missed it somehow, I can't believe the name of "The Eagles" hasn't been mentioned as one of THE most influential rock bands of the '70s here.

 

(...especially considering that the very title of THIS thread includes the lyrics written by one of that band's members)

 

***correction to follow***

 

I just saw where Lawrence mentioned them.

Edited by Dargo
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Roxy Music's "Love is the Drug" is what I consider the first new wave record. You could even cite the Sex Pistols as the band that started the whole punk/ new wave explosion. 

 

Yeah, I forgot to comment on Roxy Music. They are another band I like.

 

And the Ramones are another highly influential band from the 70's.

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Love'em, hate 'em or indifferent, unless I've missed it somehow, I can't believe the name of "The Eagles" hasn't been mentioned as one of THE most influential rock bands of the '70s here.

 

(...especially considering that the very title of THIS thread includes the lyrics written by one of that band's members)

 

***correction to follow***

 

I just saw where Lawrence mentioned them.

...and so have I.

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Eugenia's picks for Best Songwriters (I'm only listing two because they immediately come to mind, without thinking about it):

 

1) Paul Simon (The Sound of Silence, Scarborough Fair, many, many others in the S&G canon)

2) Sting (Secret Journey, Spirits in the Material World, many many others)

 

**These picks are for lyrics only - some people may not like the music, although I myself love both.) :)

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Eugenia's picks for Best Songwriters (I'm only listing two because they immediately come to mind, without thinking about it):

 

1) Paul Simon (The Sound of Silence, Scarborough Fair, many, many others in the S&G canon)

2) Sting (Secret Journey, Spirits in the Material World, many many others)

 

**These picks are for lyrics only - some people may not like the music, although I myself love both.) :)

 

Ya know Eugenia, come to think of it, when I think back on all the crap I learned in high school, it IS a wonder I can think at all!

 

(...must be why I'm still crazy after all these years, huh!)

 

;)

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Ya know Eugenia, come to think of it, when I think back on all the crap I learned in high school, it IS a wonder I can think at all!

 

(...must be why I'm still crazy after all these years, huh!)

 

;)

 

Of Simon's later work, I like "Mother and Child Reunion" better.

 

(And I prefer Simon and Garfunkel to Simon's solo stuff.)

 

But as for your being crazy, welllll.....   ;)

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Of Simon's later work, I like "Mother and Child Reunion" better.

 

(And I prefer Simon and Garfunkel to Simon's solo stuff.)

 

But as for your being crazy, welllll..... ;)

Eugenia-- A Hazy Shade of Winter is my song.

 

Dargo-- I kept the Eagles in my seventies top list, I just got lost in the shuffle--

 

 

 

"You can check out anytime but you can never leave."

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Eugenia-- A Hazy Shade of Winter is my song.

 

 

I'll probably get a virtual smack upside the head from someone for saying this, but I like the version by the Bangles better (I believe it was on the soundtrack for the film "Less Than Zero").  It's more "intense". :)

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Love'em, hate 'em or indifferent, unless I've missed it somehow, I can't believe the name of "The Eagles" hasn't been mentioned as one of THE most influential rock bands of the '70s here.

 

I love a lot of songs by the Eagles, but one of my very favorites is "The New Kid in Town".  At the end of it, the second the band sings that lovely harmonizing note, I'm back in the 1970s again. 

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Love'em, hate 'em or indifferent, unless I've missed it somehow, I can't believe the name of "The Eagles" hasn't been mentioned as one of THE most influential rock bands of the '70s here.

 

 

 

I'm not sure I'd consider them all that influential ,  but they were certainly well liked in the '70's. (I first saw them, as I've often seemed to mention, in early '72, and opening for, of all groups, The MAHAVISHNU ORCHESTRA!)

 

I'll also chime in on Paul Simon.

 

I too agree with whoever claimed to like Simon's work with Garfunkle over his solo work.  I ddid like some of Simon's solo work, but felt he wrote more introspective lyrics with Garfunkle.  Of his solo work, I like best---

 

KODACHROME

 

AMERICAN TUNE

 

ME AND JULIO(etc.)

 

LOVE ME LIKE A ROCK

 

Sepiatone

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I hate to be repetitive, but I am absolutely amazed at the obscurity of the 13th Floor Elevators. Their stuff was ******* great. Were they better known in Texas or other regions?

 

I remember hearing of them way back when. I mean, they were never a household name, but among a lot of bands and music writers, they were spoken of. I was a bit of a music nerd many years ago, so I heard of them or read about them frequently, and I've heard several bands/performers name check them and Roky Erickson as being an influence. I think the band's relatively short lifespan, combined with Roky's legendary drug use and on-again off-again incapacity, relegated them to relative obscurity.

 

You really should check out the movie You're Gonna Miss Me, if you haven't. It's on YT.

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I too agree with whoever claimed to like Simon's work with Garfunkle over his solo work.  I ddid like some of Simon's solo work, but felt he wrote more introspective lyrics with Garfunkle.

 

'Twas me.  "The Sound of Silence" has been my favorite song of all time, over any other song I'm aware of, for a number of years.  

 

Yes, I am not as much of a fan of Simon's solo work because the lyrics aren't so introspective.  "You Can Call Me Al" is a cute tune, but not on a par with "A Poem on the Underground Wall", or "My Little Town", as just two examples.  I think "Mother and Child Reunion" shows more of the "deep" Simon (as said, I love that song).

 

S&G are one of my favorite all-time bands, but I can't say they are number one.  I don't have a number one for that...

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I'm not sure I'd consider them all that influential ,  but they were certainly well liked in the '70's. (I first saw them, as I've often seemed to mention, in early '72, and opening for, of all groups, The MAHAVISHNU ORCHESTRA!)

 

I'll also chime in on Paul Simon.

 

I too agree with whoever claimed to like Simon's work with Garfunkle over his solo work.  I ddid like some of Simon's solo work, but felt he wrote more introspective lyrics with Garfunkle.  Of his solo work, I like best---

 

KODACHROME

 

AMERICAN TUNE

 

ME AND JULIO(etc.)

 

LOVE ME LIKE A ROCK

 

Sepiatone

If you want INFLUENTIAL rather than SUCCESSFUL, it's got to be Roxy Music and the Sex Pistols.

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Eugenia-- A Hazy Shade of Winter is my song.

 

Dargo-- I kept the Eagles in my seventies top list, I just got lost in the shuffle--

 

 

 

"You can check out anytime but you can never leave."

I think "Hazy Shade of Winter" is the best S & G song. Unbelievably, though, the Bangles' version may be even better.

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I think "Hazy Shade of Winter" is the best S & G song. Unbelievably, though, the Bangles' version may be even better.

 

Yep, I'd said the same about the Bangles earlier.  I think the S&G version is "wimpy" compared to the Bangles' version.

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Unbelievably I prefer Elton John's Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds to the original.

 

But, I think John Lennon is singing on the chorus of the Elton John version and that is the best part.

 

 

Anything can be improved. What's important are the people who wrote it originally-- they came out with the original conception and arrangement.

 

It's very easy to improve great art if you, yourself have talent.

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Yep, I'd said the same about the Bangles earlier. I think the S&G version is "wimpy" compared to the Bangles' version.

A Hazy Shade of Winter is a very special song for me by Simon and Garfunkel.

 

I was truly prepared not to think much of the Bangles version - - but it's really good. I may still prefer the original version, but the Bangles add more life to the song.

 

I wouldn't call the original wimpy; it's more classical--But The Bangles were just hot!

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