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I Saw A Deadhead Sticker on a Cadillac-- Don't Look Back


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DGF and Sepia - Thanks for the Chicago recommendations. I listened to them all, and chose "I'm a Man". That is a really good version.

 

There are two other RnR HoF members I'll ask about. This time it isn't because I wasn't a fan, it's just that I don't know many songs by them.

 

Bobby Bland: I currently have "Farther Up the Road", "Stormy Monday Blues" and "Ain't No Love In the Heart of the City".

 

and

 

Solomon Burke: I currently have "Cry to Me", "Everybody Needs Somebody to Love" and "Got to Get You Off My Mind".

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DGF and Sepia - Thanks for the Chicago recommendations. I listened to them all, and chose "I'm a Man". That is a really good version.

 

There are two other RnR HoF members I'll ask about. This time it isn't because I wasn't a fan, it's just that I don't know many songs by them.

 

Bobby Bland: I currently have "Farther Up the Road", "Stormy Monday Blues" and "Ain't No Love In the Heart of the City".

 

and

 

Solomon Burke: I currently have "Cry to Me", "Everybody Needs Somebody to Love" and "Got to Get You Off My Mind".

 

Lawrence--

 

 

When I was a kid, I had two run- of-the mill singles by each of those artists off the jukebox. But I don't think they were necessarily big hits for either of them--

 

Solomon Burke - - You Can Run But You Can't Hide

 

Bobby Blue Bland - - Blue Moon-- his R&B take on a Rodgers & Hart standard

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Fra--

 

After reading your post on the Fleetwoods, it immediately came to my mind that they had this fantastic song called "Tragedy". The memory of this title has been, maybe, obliterated by the more recent Bee Gees song.

 

And it seems like maybe that was their last big hit.

 

The idea of integrating the group with boys and girls seemingly died out after this. As you well know, Smokey Robinson originally had his wife Claudette in The Miracles, but she had to leave to try to start a family. She was never replaced with another woman.

 

The only other group I can remember that had a woman was the group that did the song "Since I Don't Have You" ; it seems like their name was something like Skyliners or something like that. I don't remember if they had another hit, but that one was priceless.

 

It was indeed the SKYLINERS with female member DONNA GROOM

 

THE PLATTERS too, had a woman among the line-up.  ZOLA TAYLOR was the first and was replaced by BARBARA RANDOLPH in '62

 

As for those "horn bands" of the late '60's and early '70's, let's not forget IDES OF MARCH("Vehicle") and of course, BLOOD SWEAT AND TEARS.  If there are others, I likely forgot them.

 

Sepiatone

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Fra--

 

After reading your post on the Fleetwoods, it immediately came to my mind that they had this fantastic song called "Tragedy". The memory of this title has been, maybe, obliterated by the more recent Bee Gees song.

 

And it seems like maybe that was their last big hit.

 

The idea of integrating the group with boys and girls seemingly died out after this. As you well know, Smokey Robinson originally had his wife Claudette in The Miracles, but she had to leave to try to start a family. She was never replaced with another woman.

 

The only other group I can remember that had a woman was the group that did the song "Since I Don't Have You" ; it seems like their name was something like Skyliners or something like that. I don't remember if they had another hit, but that one was priceless.

The original and definitive version of "Tragedy" was by Thomas Wayne..........The female member of the Skyliners in the late fifties and early sixties was Janet Vogel, who died all too early. ("This I Swear" is one of my favorite ballads).

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The original and definitive version of "Tragedy" was by Thomas Wayne..........The female member of the Skyliners in the late fifties and early sixties was Janet Vogel, who died all too early. ("This I Swear" is one of my favorite ballads).

 

I stand corrected DGF.  Vogel was in their original line-up.  Groom was the SECOND replacement after Vogel's 1980 suicide.  Can't recall who came between the two.

 

PRINCESS:  I agree with your definition but, the thread title does seem to referrence a different time period.  The term "Deadhead" often correlates with THE GRATEFUL DEAD, and although I thought they were OK, I can't reconcile their period and/or musical "vibe" with that of the likes of Chuck Berry, Elvis and Gene Vincent.

 

And I'm still wracking my memory trying to come up with the name of another '50'-early '60's R&B vocal group that had any female members before any of the mid-to-late '60's folk and "folk-rock" groups.

 

Sepiatone

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I stand corrected DGF.  Vogel was in their original line-up.  Groom was the SECOND replacement after Vogel's 1980 suicide.  Can't recall who came between the two.

 

PRINCESS:  I agree with your definition but, the thread title does seem to referrence a different time period.  The term "Deadhead" often correlates with THE GRATEFUL DEAD, and although I thought they were OK, I can't reconcile their period and/or musical "vibe" with that of the likes of Chuck Berry, Elvis and Gene Vincent.

 

And I'm still wracking my memory trying to come up with the name of another '50'-early '60's R&B vocal group that had any female members before any of the mid-to-late '60's folk and "folk-rock" groups.

 

Sepiatone

I never realized that there were such rigid rules regarding what is discussed in particular threads. Right now, I am adding to my list of greatest songs my favorite jazz vocal versions of the great American songbook. Sinatra, Sarah, Ella, Billie, Eckstine, and, surprisingly, for a lot of songs, Julie London has the best version.

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I never realized that there were such rigid rules regarding what is discussed in particular threads. Right now, I am adding to my list of greatest songs my favorite jazz vocal versions of the great American songbook. Sinatra, Sarah, Ella, Billie, Eckstine, and, surprisingly, for a lot of songs, Julie London has the best version.

 

 

I'm talking about the American popular song--

 

my favorite singer has always been Judy Garland. In my time I think the best singers were Andy Williams, it would be hard to say Johnny Mathis wasn't as equal, and of course Barbra Streisand. Three other women for my generation who were great singers: Shirley Bassey, Eydie Gorme and Dionne Warwick.

 

And also I have high regard for Sammy Davis jr., Dean Martin, Steve Lawrence & Jack Jones.

 

 

If I don't put in personal preference-- being objective and real-- I think the three best pop American singers are:

 

Frank Sinatra and Nat King Cole along with Sarah Vaughan.

 

I've often listened to all the singers singing the same song with different arrangements and it's just fascinating how that turns out.

 

I've heard Andy Williams, Sammy Davis jr., Steve & Eydie and Dionne Warwick in concert. They all sounded better than the recordings.

 

BTW--

 

I don't know what song you're talking about with Julie London - - because she has a very limited voice. If you've never heard Barbra Streisand sing Cry Me a River on her first album, I would suggest that you listen to it.

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I never realized that there were such rigid rules regarding what is discussed in particular threads. Right now, I am adding to my list of greatest songs my favorite jazz vocal versions of the great American songbook. Sinatra, Sarah, Ella, Billie, Eckstine, and, surprisingly, for a lot of songs, Julie London has the best version.

Fra-- Why don't you throw out a few songs so that I can see where you're at--

 

I've got a fantastic version of Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered by Jack Jones.

 

I like "It was Just One of Those Things" sung by Frank Sinatra in Young At Heart.

 

Sarah Vaughan's Misty is still probably one of the best examples of American song styling. Johnny Mathis was a close friend of hers and copied his version directly from her. She probably coached him.

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I've got a fantastic version of Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered by Jack Jones.

 

 

 

If you haven't already, you'd enjoy the treatment given the song by LAURA FYGI.

 

Yeah, and I always thought Jack Jones was kinda cool.  Maybe because he resembled my cousin Jerry, who also was kinda cool.  :)

 

 

Sepiatone

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Fra-- Why don't you throw out a few songs so that I can see where you're at--

 

I've got a fantastic version of Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered by Jack Jones.

 

I like "It was Just One of Those Things" sung by Frank Sinatra in Young At Heart.

 

Sarah Vaughan's Misty is still probably one of the best examples of American song styling. Johnny Mathis was a close friend of hers and copied his version directly from her. She probably coached him.

Ella's version of Bewitched Bothered......is the best. Here's one great one by each of them. Julie London--"The End of a Love Affair"------Billie Holiday-"Until the Real Thing Comes Along....Sarah Vaughan "Whatever Lola Wants".....Billy Eckstine "Stella by Starlight"......Sinatra "Autimn in New York"...Ella Fitzgerald  "Laura"

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I'll just wait patiently for some of you "aficionados"  to get around to mentioning BILLIE HOLIDAY and DINAH WASHINGTON

 

Two of MY favorites among the others mentioned here, who I also like a lot.

 

And throw in BETTY CARTER for good measure.  ;)

 

Sepiatone

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I'll just wait patiently for some of you "aficionados"  to get around to mentioning BILLIE HOLIDAY and DINAH WASHINGTON

 

Two of MY favorites among the others mentioned here, who I also like a lot.

 

And throw in BETTY CARTER for good measure.  ;)

 

Sepiatone

 

All fantastic jazz singers.     As for American jazzy pop, I'm in tune with Princess :Frank Sinatra and Nat King Cole along with Sarah Vaughan.    (Ella has been mentioned and is a darling).

 

Funny but the only men I listen to in that style are Frank and Nat,  but I listen to a lot women singers.   I would add Anita O'Day as well as current singers like Karen Allison.

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I've never been big on Sarah Vaughn.  But we all DO have our preferrences.  And that doesn't mean I think she WASN'T good.  I'd be foolish to imply that.

 

As for Frank and Nat, I prefer Nat.  HIS style suits me more.  But of course, Frank's "Young At Heart" can't be beat. But.....

 

I do recall reading an interview some years ago in which Sinatra said to the effect..."Everybody makes a BIG DEAL out of me and my "phrasing".  BAH!  I'll tell ya...If I could phrase a tune HALF as beautifully as Nat "King" Cole could, I'd die HAPPY!"  They both had a HUGE mutual admiration for each other.  and....

 

Has PEGGY LEE been mentioned?  If I missed it, I apologize. 

 

Sepiatone

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I've never been big on Sarah Vaughn.  But we all DO have our preferrences.  And that doesn't mean I think she WASN'T good.  I'd be foolish to imply that.

 

As for Frank and Nat, I prefer Nat.  HIS style suits me more.  But of course, Frank's "Young At Heart" can't be beat. But.....

 

I do recall reading an interview some years ago in which Sinatra said to the effect..."Everybody makes a BIG DEAL out of me and my "phrasing".  BAH!  I'll tell ya...If I could phrase a tune HALF as beautifully as Nat "King" Cole could, I'd die HAPPY!"  They both had a HUGE mutual admiration for each other.  and....

 

Has PEGGY LEE been mentioned?  If I missed it, I apologize. 

 

Sepiatone

"I Apologize" was by Billy Eckstine. One of his signature songs......Surprisingly, Julie London outdoes Peggy Lee. Because she was so sexy, people underestimate her.

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I've never been big on Sarah Vaughn.  But we all DO have our preferrences.  And that doesn't mean I think she WASN'T good.  I'd be foolish to imply that.

 

As for Frank and Nat, I prefer Nat.  HIS style suits me more.  But of course, Frank's "Young At Heart" can't be beat. But.....

 

I do recall reading an interview some years ago in which Sinatra said to the effect..."Everybody makes a BIG DEAL out of me and my "phrasing".  BAH!  I'll tell ya...If I could phrase a tune HALF as beautifully as Nat "King" Cole could, I'd die HAPPY!"  They both had a HUGE mutual admiration for each other.  and....

 

Has PEGGY LEE been mentioned?  If I missed it, I apologize. 

 

Sepiatone

Nat King Cole's best was "That Sunday That Summer".

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I'll just wait patiently for some of you "aficionados" to get around to mentioning BILLIE HOLIDAY and DINAH WASHINGTON

 

Two of MY favorites among the others mentioned here, who I also like a lot.

 

And throw in BETTY CARTER for good measure. ;)

 

Sepiatone

 

Sep-- it goes without saying that Billie Holiday's in a category all by herself.

 

But I was planning on talking about Dinah Washington in terms of artists who I liked in the early sixties. I had her singles on Roulette then, which turned out to be from her last album. She died of a prescription drug-alcohol related incident that was probably an accident.

 

My favorite record for her at that time was a song called Where Are You? I believe somebody told me it was a standard. It was the perfect little 45 jukebox/ slow dance favorite. You only have to hear this one song to know why they called her the Queen of the Blues.

 

Also prior to that she had a big hit with Nat King Cole's song Unforgettable.

 

Dinah Washington was or is a very unique talent.

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Nat King Cole's best was "That Sunday That Summer".

 

See, you have that tendency to claim as somebody's "best"  something that YOU like best.  For all you know, Nat might not have even LIKED it all that much.    

 

But for me,  I lean towards "Nature Boy".

 

 

Sepiatone

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See, you have that tendency to claim as somebody's "best"  something that YOU like best.  For all you know, Nat might not have even LIKED it all that much.    

 

But for me,  I lean towards "Nature Boy".

 

 

Sepiatone

 

Of course when one says 'best' they mean best for them.  (especially folks like DGF who are not musicians and have little to no knowledge about music,  ha ha).

 

But yea,  Nature Boy is a lot better Nat song!      As for my favorite it is;  Just Another Blues with lyrics by Nat.

 

The song is about a song that is singing to us related to the how blues had evolved.   That while the blues are now hip and we can hear hints of what is to come (Rock and Roll),  it is just another blues.    

 

Here are the lyrics to this 40s song:

 

I'm just another blues from nineteen twenty two,

A super extraordinary flaperoo!

For years I was a dusty on the well-known shelf,

And really feeling awful sorry for myself!

Poor me, I'm just another blues.

Then someone got the notion that I could revive,

He took away my sadnes and he gave me jive;

He added boogie woogie, and when he got through,

He made my blues a blues that anyone could do;

To me, I'm just another blues.

I'd like to thank you for the boogie ride,

Thank you for the A to the bar.

Now I'm on the solid side,

Biggest attraction by far!

I'm just another blues of nineteen forty four,

When they start to play me thay all ask for more.

Who'd ever guess that this success could all take place

Because somebody put some boogie in my bass;

But still, I'm just another blues.

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Of course when one says 'best' they mean best for them.  (especially folks like DGF who are not musicians and have little to no knowledge about music,  ha ha).

 

But yea,  Nature Boy is a lot better Nat song!      As for my favorite it is;  Just Another Blues with lyrics by Nat.

 

The song is about a song that is singing to us related to the how blues had evolved.   That while the blues are now hip and we can hear hints of what is to come (Rock and Roll),  it is just another blues.    

 

Here are the lyrics to this 40s song:

 

I'm just another blues from nineteen twenty two,

A super extraordinary flaperoo!

For years I was a dusty on the well-known shelf,

And really feeling awful sorry for myself!

Poor me, I'm just another blues.

Then someone got the notion that I could revive,

He took away my sadnes and he gave me jive;

He added boogie woogie, and when he got through,

He made my blues a blues that anyone could do;

To me, I'm just another blues.

I'd like to thank you for the boogie ride,

Thank you for the A to the bar.

Now I'm on the solid side,

Biggest attraction by far!

I'm just another blues of nineteen forty four,

When they start to play me thay all ask for more.

Who'd ever guess that this success could all take place

Because somebody put some boogie in my bass;

But still, I'm just another blues.

I believe that "Nature Boy" was the number one song in the U.S. on the day I was born.

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See, you have that tendency to claim as somebody's "best"  something that YOU like best.  For all you know, Nat might not have even LIKED it all that much.    

 

But for me,  I lean towards "Nature Boy".

 

 

Sepiatone

We've been through this about 50 times. I'm just leaving out the IMO.

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We've been through this about 50 times. I'm just leaving out the IMO.

I think opinions about particular singers can be somewhat subjective, but not entirely. If I know a singer's complete output, then I think I can be rather objective as to what their best work is.

 

But even knowing that, artists go through phases and some people might prefer a a particular Phase. Andy Williams, being my favorite male singer-- I can easily tell you what his best songs were in terms of the best musical performance for his voice and style. I can also tell you what songs he had that were hits with the public. Sometimes those two categories can intersect.

 

 

I like Nat King Cole a lot and I understand is exalted position in popular music, but I'm not an authority on his work.

 

I started listening to him in the late 1950s and I never reviewed his previous work.

 

My three favorite songs for him I picked up from the late fifties and early sixties because that's what I know the best. They could be his best work, but I wouldn't know for sure because I don't know his work well enough to make that statement.

 

My three favorite Nat King Cole songs are Night Lights, To the Ends of the Earth, and That Sunday, That Summer.

 

All three of those are great songs, but also these songs relate to me personally because I was alive when they were hits and I heard them on the radio.

 

Well, everything is subjective in terms of what is your favorite song, or not.

 

However, I think you have to be knowledgeable about an artist's work in its entirety to make a complete blanket statement as to what was the best or the most outstanding songs in his or her career.

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I think opinions about particular singers can be somewhat subjective, but not entirely. If I know a singer's complete output, then I think I can be rather objective as to what their best work is.

 

But even knowing that, artists go through phases and some people might prefer a a particular Phase. Andy Williams, being my favorite male singer-- I can easily tell you what his best songs were in terms of the best musical performance for his voice and style. I can also tell you what songs he had that were hits with the public. Sometimes those two categories can intersect.

 

 

I like Nat King Cole a lot and I understand is exalted position in popular music, but I'm not an authority on his work.

 

I started listening to him in the late 1950s and I never reviewed his previous work.

 

My three favorite songs for him I picked up from the late fifties and early sixties because that's what I know the best. They could be his best work, but I wouldn't know for sure because I don't know his work well enough to make that statement.

 

My three favorite Nat King Cole songs are Night Lights, To the Ends of the Earth, and That Sunday, That Summer.

 

All three of those are great songs, but also these songs relate to me personally because I was alive when they were hits and I heard them on the radio.

 

Well, everything is subjective in terms of what is your favorite song, or not.

 

However, I think you have to be knowledgeable about an artist's work in its entirety to make a complete blanket statement as to what was the best or the most outstanding songs in his or her career.

 

Great post!    Yes,  all opinions are NOT equal since exposure is a key element one needs in order to have an informed opinion.

 

Often when one's opinion is 'out there' the reason is lack of exposure. 

 

E.g. a few years ago at another thread we were discussing directors and people listed their top 10.   Someone didn't have Hitchcock listed.   I asked them about this and they admitted they have never seen a Hitchcock film (which I kind of suspected since 9 of the directors they did list got their start in the 80s).

 

Of course one could have seen every Hitchcock film, as well as many of the films of his contemporaries,  and still NOT list him in their top 10.    But that opinion would be an informed one based on being exposed to those films instead of any uninformed one based on lack of exposure.  

 

Note the above is why I tend to limit my comments to jazz artist,  since when it comes to other genres or sub-genres the only other one I was really into was British Invasion.   

 

As for Nat:  I tend to favor his 40s trio work before he became more commercial and pop.    On these 40s trio recordings there is typically a piano and guitar solo to go along with Nat's great voice making the music jazz instead of pop.   (the trios guitar player Oscar Moore was way ahead of his time and sadly is barely known today).

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I think opinions about particular singers can be somewhat subjective, but not entirely. If I know a singer's complete output, then I think I can be rather objective as to what their best work is.

 

But even knowing that, artists go through phases and some people might prefer a a particular Phase. Andy Williams, being my favorite male singer-- I can easily tell you what his best songs were in terms of the best musical performance for his voice and style. I can also tell you what songs he had that were hits with the public. Sometimes those two categories can intersect.

 

 

I like Nat King Cole a lot and I understand is exalted position in popular music, but I'm not an authority on his work.

 

I started listening to him in the late 1950s and I never reviewed his previous work.

 

My three favorite songs for him I picked up from the late fifties and early sixties because that's what I know the best. They could be his best work, but I wouldn't know for sure because I don't know his work well enough to make that statement.

 

My three favorite Nat King Cole songs are Night Lights, To the Ends of the Earth, and That Sunday, That Summer.

 

All three of those are great songs, but also these songs relate to me personally because I was alive when they were hits and I heard them on the radio.

 

Well, everything is subjective in terms of what is your favorite song, or not.

 

However, I think you have to be knowledgeable about an artist's work in its entirety to make a complete blanket statement as to what was the best or the most outstanding songs in his or her career.

In general, I don't like Cole's style. I like Sinatra , Echstine, and Tony Bennett a lot better among male vocalists. I find Cole similar to Johnny Mathis, and like them about equally.

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