Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

I Saw A Deadhead Sticker on a Cadillac-- Don't Look Back


Princess of Tap
 Share

Recommended Posts

I there's ANY group that I think I'm qualified to answer trivia questions about their music, it's Smokey Robinson and the Miracles. Yet I've recently stumbled upon a great song of theirs which I had never heard. I thought this was impossible. It's "If Your Mother Only Knew".

:o

Never heard it before?  Well, welcome to the fold.

 

Better late than NEVER!  From their "I'll Try Something New" LP( '62), I didn't get to hearing it myself  until the mid to late '60's.

 

Sepiatone

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:o

Never heard it before?  Well, welcome to the fold.

 

Better late than NEVER!  From their "I'll Try Something New" LP( '62), I didn't get to hearing it myself  until the mid to late '60's.

 

Sepiatone

My top 5 Miracles songs (none well known)

 

Can You Love a Poor Boy

Darling Dear

Here I Go Again

You Can Depend on Me

Oh Be My Love

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Five seemingly lame early '60s songs by female artists that will send chills down your spine:

 

Popsicles and Icicles---Murmaids

Johnny Get Angry---Joanie Summers

Johnny Angel---Shelly Fabares

Bobby's Girl---Marcie Blane

I Will Follow Him----Little Peggy March

 

Joanie Sommers and Peggy March are very good singers and respected recording artists. I don't think they should be lumped in this group of mediocre singers, just because they're girls.

 

On the flip side of Johnny get angry, Joanie had a wonderful rendition of A Summer Place - - even Johnny get angry is a good example of her vocal Style.

 

As for Peggy March - - if you remember that song at all-- her voice can stand on its own merits for that two-minute record.

 

One of the worst gimmick singers that I remember was Brian Hyland-- Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini.

 

Then there the joke songs like that Mr. Custer, the Purple People Eater and The Saga of Running Bear-- that was somewhat the quality of the early sixties.

 

Bobby Darin was a great singer, who definitely cashed in on the gimmick records before going on to legitimate music. So if you're going to put somebody in a lame song category you want to start with Bobby Darin's Splish Splash just to be fair because he's on the male side of it.

 

In those days people had to record what the record companies forced them to record when they were just starting out.

 

I can recall Brian Wilson saying that Capitol had men in the Brill Building writing songs for the Beach Boys that Brian refused to record. But most artists didn't have Brian's songwriting ability and they had to do what was put in front of them.

 

So when it comes to the early sixties, sometimes it's hard to separate the fine singer from the Fabian Fortes of the Top 40.

 

Fra-- I know you remember Chancellor records.LOL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Joanie Sommers and Peggy March are very good singers and respected recording artists. I don't think they should be lumped in this group of mediocre singers, just because they're girls.

 

On the flip side of Johnny get angry, Joanie had a wonderful rendition of A Summer Place - - even Johnny get angry is a good example of her vocal Style.

 

As for Peggy March - - if you remember that song at all-- her voice can stand on its own merits for that two-minute record.

 

One of the worst gimmick singers that I remember was Brian Hyland-- Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini.

 

Then there the joke songs like that Mr. Custer, the Purple People Eater and The Saga of Running Bear-- that was somewhat the quality of the early sixties.

 

Bobby Darin was a great singer, who definitely cashed in on the gimmick records before going on to legitimate music. So if you're going to put somebody in a lame song category you want to start with Bobby Darin's Splish Splash just to be fair because he's on the male side of it.

 

In those days people had to record what the record companies forced them to record when they were just starting out.

 

I can recall Brian Wilson saying that Capitol had men in the Brill Building writing songs for the Beach Boys that Brian refused to record. But most artists didn't have Brian's songwriting ability and they had to do what was put in front of them.

 

So when it comes to the early sixties, sometimes it's hard to separate the fine singer from the Fabian Fortes of the Top 40.

 

Fra-- I know you remember Chancellor records.LOL

The Murmaids' song is actually the best of the five........Frankie Avalon had four great songs on Chancellor....."Venus", "Why", "Bobby Sox to Stockings", and "Where are You".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Murmaids' song is actually the best of the five........Frankie Avalon had four great songs on Chancellor....."Venus", "Why", "Bobby Sox to Stockings", and "Where are You".

 

 

I saw Frankie Avalon perform Dee Dee Dinah live on American Bandstand from Philadelphia-- I can't help but notice that you didn't mention that turkey.

 

But I bought Venus--it's a beautiful song-- I even remember the B/W was

I'm Broke. That proves I don't have Alzheimer's.LOL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Y'all seemed too, to overlook "Beachwood 45-789" by The MARVELETTES( and a song co-written by MARVIN GAYE)

 

and THE ANGELS popular  "My Boyfriend's Back".

 

There was also SUE THOMPSON  who gave us John D. Loudrmilk's "Paper Tiger" and also his "Sad Movies Always Make Me Cry".

 

Sue was noted for her "impish" and "teeny-bop" sounding voice and fooled people into thinking she was another "teen sensation" like BRENDA LEE.  But in truth, when she recorded "Papaer Tiger" she was already in her 30's.

 

As for Brian Hyland's "Bikini" song, I liked it then, but so did a LOT of people.  But I took to( due to my ALWAYS too, checking out "B" sides)  it's flipside tune "Don't Dilly Dally, Sally".  Yeah, plastic "whitebread" pop, but then, I WAS only nine years old at the time.  :)

 

Hell----I also liked PAT BOONE's "Speedy Gonzalez"!  :D

 

 

Sepiatone

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Y'all seemed too, to overlook "Beachwood 45-789" by The MARVELETTES( and a song co-written by MARVIN GAYE)

 

and THE ANGELS popular "My Boyfriend's Back".

 

There was also SUE THOMPSON who gave us John D. Loudrmilk's "Paper Tiger" and also his "Sad Movies Always Make Me Cry".

 

Sue was noted for her "impish" and "teeny-bop" sounding voice and fooled people into thinking she was another "teen sensation" like BRENDA LEE. But in truth, when she recorded "Papaer Tiger" she was already in her 30's.

 

As for Brian Hyland's "Bikini" song, I liked it then, but so did a LOT of people. But I took to( due to my ALWAYS too, checking out "B" sides) it's flipside tune "Don't Dilly Dally, Sally". Yeah, plastic "whitebread" pop, but then, I WAS only nine years old at the time. :)

 

Hell----I also liked PAT BOONE's "Speedy Gonzalez"! :D

 

 

Sepiatone

And Brenda Lee was a the teenager who couldn't travel without her mother to a nightclub to sing because she was a minor.

 

The last few years she's been singing at some Indian casinos in Kansas at Christmas time with the Rockin Around the Christmas Tree.

 

I'm looking at her and she appears to be a few years older than me. If she had been 30 years old in 1959 or 1960 she probably be dead now.

 

Wiki has her birthdate as 1944.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fra--

 

BTW-- You mentioned The Orlons song Not Me in the quiz. It was on the flip side of Don't Hang Up or South Street. I saw them perform in '63 and then they just kind of went away. They were on Cameo-Parkway; that's another Philly label right?

Yes, the most successful Philly label prior to Gamble and Huff--Orlons, Rydell, Chubby Checker, Dovells, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Addendum on Brenda Lee

 

Sep-- it looks as though you got the forgettable Sue Thompson,who did Paper Tiger, confused with The Talented Brenda Lee.

 

Brenda Lee was a chart-topping accomplished singer who still has a career.

 

Her biggest hits were I'm Sorry, Sweet Nothin's and,one that I bought called, All Alone Am I. She had a recording contract with Decca.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fra--

 

I've never heard of Gamble and Huff-- did they have any national hits?

 

How about "Procter and Gamble and Huff"?

 

Now SURELY you've heard of THEM, haven't you, Princess?!

 

(...nope, not those folks who make all those supermarket products...that law firm who'll take your case no matter how stupid it might be...yeah, kind'a like this joke here)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gamble and Huff were the heads of Philadelphia International Records, which released Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes ("If You Don't Know Me by Now"), Billy Paul ("Me and Mrs. Jones"), and the biggest hits of the O'Jays.

 

Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huff were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, in the non-performers category, in 2008.

 

Learn more here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamble_and_Huff

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Addendum on Brenda Lee

 

Sep-- it looks as though you got the forgettable Sue Thompson,who did Paper Tiger, confused with The Talented Brenda Lee.

 

Brenda Lee was a chart-topping accomplished singer who still has a career.

 

Her biggest hits were I'm Sorry, Sweet Nothin's and,one that I bought called, All Alone Am I. She had a recording contract with Decca.

 

No, I didn't get them confused.  YOU got confused.  I stated that many people thought Thompson was also a teen-aged girl singer due to the very youngish sounding SINGING voice she had.  But that she was in her THIRTIES when she did "Paper Tiger". 

 

Looks like EVELYN WOOD isn't doing you any favors.  ;)

 

Sepiatone

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gamble and Huff were the heads of Philadelphia International Records, which released Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes ("If You Don't Know Me by Now"), Billy Paul ("Me and Mrs. Jones"), and the biggest hits of the O'Jays.

 

Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huff were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, in the non-performers category, in 2008.

 

Learn more here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamble_and_Huff

Also handled Teddy Pendergrass, the Three Degrees, etc., and did many hits with the Spinners, Lou Rawls, and others.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gamble and Huff were the heads of Philadelphia International Records, which released Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes ("If You Don't Know Me by Now"), Billy Paul ("Me and Mrs. Jones"), and the biggest hits of the O'Jays.

 

Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huff were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, in the non-performers category, in 2008.

 

Learn more here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamble_and_Huff

Also handled Teddy Pendergrass, the Three Degrees, etc., and did many hits with the Spinners, Lou Rawls, and others.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fra-- my first husband bought all those records and I must have played them, but since I didn't buy them I never looked at the labels.

 

The songs that he really liked were Didn't I blow your mind this time, Smiling faces and I bet you by Golly Wow-- were those from some of the groups that were on the Philly label?

 

I remember Teddy Pendergrass very well from the early eighties - --- he was some kind s sex idol for some of the ladies that I worked with in the advertising office in Chicago. That is until he had an automobile accident and was found, discovered in Drag. More serious than that, it seems like he was permanently paralyzed from this accident. I don't know what happened to him after that--he had been very big.

 

Lou Rawls was from Chicago and had a Capitol recording contract for years. They must have dropped him. He was truly a fine singer and Entertainer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, I didn't get them confused. YOU got confused. I stated that many people thought Thompson was also a teen-aged girl singer due to the very youngish sounding SINGING voice she had. But that she was in her THIRTIES when she did "Paper Tiger".

 

Looks like EVELYN WOOD isn't doing you any favors. ;)

 

Sepiatone

Sep--

 

So sorry. I didn't really read the paragraph; I just skimmed it. I thought it was about Brenda Lee. Because I wouldn't have wasted any time talking about Sue Thompson anyway.

 

As I Rock Around The Christmas Tree, you have my most sincerest apologies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Last night I watched that My Music special on the PBS and they had rock groups from 65-67 doing live performances.

 

All the American ones I'd already seen - - but they had some British footage for The Kinks and Wayne Fontana & the Mindbenders that was interesting.

 

Some of the American TV performances were lip synced from The Mamas & the Papas and The Association.

 

But I saw some very good live performances off Ed Sullivan from Spanky and Our Gang and a terrific one with Felix Cavaliere and the Rascals doing Groovin'.

 

Another one of my songs that came up from the Smothers Brothers Show was Stephen Stills and Buffalo Springfield doing For What It's Worth. They all had on nice jackets except for Neil Young. LOL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Th

 

Fra-- my first husband bought all those records and I must have played them, but since I didn't buy them I never looked at the labels.

The songs that he really liked were Didn't I blow your mind this time, Smiling faces and I bet you by Golly Wow-- were those from some of the groups that were on the Philly label?

I remember Teddy Pendergrass very well from the early eighties - --- he was some kind s sex idol for some of the ladies that I worked with in the advertising office in Chicago. That is until he had an automobile accident and was found, discovered in Drag. More serious than that, it seems like he was permanently paralyzed from this accident. I don't know what happened to him after that--he had been very big.

Lou Rawls was from Chicago and had a Capitol recording contract for years. They must have dropped him. He was truly a fine singer and Entertainer.

 

There was another great producer in the '70s in Philly named Thom Bell, who was separate from Gamble and Huff. He did the Stylistics and the Delfonics, among others. The songs you mentioned were from these groups. There was another producing group called WMOT that did Blue Magic and other acts. A fourth group was Vince Montana and Salsoul records. The '70s were truly a golden age of Philly soul and disco music.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The '70s were truly a golden age of Philly soul and disco music.

 

Heh!

 

That's like saying ROSEANNE BARR is the most beautiful woman in her chair.  But I know what you mean.

 

I always make fun of "Philly Soul" being an oxymoron, but I will admit some pretty good stuff came out of it.  Just not a whole LOT.

 

Sepiatone

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Heh!

 

That's like saying ROSEANNE BARR is the most beautiful woman in her chair.  But I know what you mean.

 

I always make fun of "Philly Soul" being an oxymoron, but I will admit some pretty good stuff came out of it.  Just not a whole LOT.

 

Sepiatone

Don't be smug. A lot of Motown's best stuff came after it moved to L.A.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...