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CaveGirl
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With all the emphasis on the film "Purple Rain" recently due to the loss of Prince, I got thinking about how often rain is an integral part of the plot in many films.

 

Sometimes it moves the story along, as in with Gene Kelly using it to advance the euphoria of his newly found love, sometimes it is part of the title of a piece, and sometimes it is just used for cinematic effect in a particular scene, as in the one with Robert Blake looking out the glass, covered in raindrops in "In Cold Blood".

 

It is up to you to come up with more films that utilize rain in any way, and I'm sure this will bring out all the drips and people who are all wet here, if nothing else can!

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The end of Roy Batty (Rutger Hauer) in Blade Runner is one of my favorite scenes using rain for effect.

Right on, Lawrence. He was so good in that film, also "Nighthawks" in which he basically blew Sly off the screen. I think they had to cut Hauer's part back a bit since he was so overshadowing Stallone in the film.

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CG, I adore the notion of rain in/on film; several years ago, at the height of drought conditions in my part of the country; I devoted a post to rain washed films on my (now defunct) blog. A (somewhat ) lesser-known film by Hiroshi Shimizu, The Masseurs and A Woman (1938), and Akira Kurosawa's One Wonderful Sunday (1947) both inspired my thoughts on rainy days and Sundays. I included a reference to the rain sequence in Blade Runner (1982), which is one of the more visually poetic depictions. I also included three versions of the film with the title Rain: the first starring Gloria Swanson (1929), the second starring Joan Crawford (1932), the third directed by Joris Regen (1929), image below. I also can't imagine film noir without rain washed streets and the sound of falling rain punctuating some tough guy's patois.

 

giphy.gif

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As per whistlingypsy's post, many Japanese/Asian films utilize rain to set mood/tension, or frame a sequence - the rain before/during the climatic battle in Seven Samurai that also gives life to the farmer's paddy fields in the following sequence is one film that springs to mind. Indian films often use the wait for & break of the monsoon rains in a similar way, but also as a major plot device, since everyday life is so heavily influenced/dependent on it.

 

On a different tack, the absence of rain until it's appearance in the final moments (as a slightly iffy special effect) drives the actions of Dan Evans taking the prisoner escort job in 3:10 to Yuma and marks the transition from tension to happy ending (seemingly for all).

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Well, it's raining in the final scene of Breakfast at Tiffany's.  Sentimental though it may be (but actually I don't think it is), it's hard to resist that final shot of Holly, Paul, and the cat, all three soaking wet and hugging each other. 

 

Incidentally, I love rain. Aside from the movies (and I love rainy scenes in movies), I just love rainy days. I actually prefer them to sunny ones, most of the time. Of course, one can have too much of a good thing. But in general, I love misty grey cloudy days, and if there's a little rain there too, so much the better. Rainy days are so much more interesting than clear blue sky sunny ones. And we need rain. I never understand why people complain when it's rainy -especially if a rainy day follows a week of sunny ones.

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Incidentally, I love rain. Aside from the movies (and I love rainy scenes in movies), I just love rainy days. I actually prefer them to sunny ones, most of the time. Of course, one can have too much of a good thing. But in general, I love misty grey cloudy days, and if there's a little rain there too, so much the better. Rainy days are so much more interesting than clear blue sky sunny ones. And we need rain. I never understand why people complain when it's rainy -especially if a rainy day follows a week of sunny ones.

 

Eeh! Screw THAT, lady!!!

 

(...you can't play tennis in the freakin' rain, ya know) ;)

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Well Dargs, being as you live in Arizona, I'm assuming you enjoy the sun. Me, I'd go crazy. Nice to visit, but...etc.

 

Reminds me of all the times Northwest Airlines would send this L.A. boy to their headquarters in Minneapolis for business...in JANUARY!!!

 

Yep, and I remember each and every time I'd step out of the MSP terminal to get on my hotel shuttle bus I'd think to myself..."HOW IN THE HELL DO YOU LOCALS AROUND HERE LIVE IN THIS CRAPPY COLD WEATHER FOR AT LEAST FIVE MONTHS OUT OF EVERY FREAKIN' YEAR???"!!!

 

(...hell, if it rained more than 3 or 4 days in a row in L.A., I'd start getting "cabin fever", 'cause I couldn't either be out on the tennis court, at the beach, OR ridin' one of my motorcycles around...nope, I just never got why ANYONE would choose to him the frozen freakin' TUNDRA...OH, and I never received all that great an answer to my query whenever I'd ask 'em...well, OTHER than that one about "enjoying the four seasons", anyway...although it seems EVENTUALLY there's many of 'em who FINALLY figure out they DON'T and move to the sunbelt...funny, ain't it?!!!) ;)

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As a native Oregonian, if there's one thing I know about... it's rain.

 

Some of my favorite rain scenes have already been mentioned (Singin' in the Rain and Breakfast at Tiffany's).  

 

-There's always the corny "love scene" between Spiderman and Mary Jane in the Tobey Maguire Spiderman series.  You know the one where it's pouring and Spiderman is hanging upside down and Mary Jane pulls his mask back so his mouth is exposed and they share a romantic smooch in the rain.

 

-In Jurassic Park, the epic T-Rex scene is set in the rain.

 

-Humphrey Bogart standing in the rain at the train station reading Ingrid Bergman's "Dear John" letter in Casablanca.

 

-In Clue, it's raining outside for I believe the entire film.

 

-In Rocky Horror Picture Show, Brad and Janet have to run through the rain and end up taking refuge in Dr. Frank N Furter's castle. 

 

-In Key Largo, it's raining throughout the entire film.

 

-It also rains throughout The Spiral Staircase

 

-In Cape Fear (1962), a huge thunderstorm hits at the climax of the film when Gregory Peck is trying to trap Robert Mitchum.

 

-In Pleasantville, a major pivotal moment in the film is when it rains for the first time. This new experience excites the younger generation and angers the older generation.  It is after the rainstorm when the town's transformation from black and white to color really starts to speed up.  

 

It's interesting how rain can be symbolic, like in Pleasantville, it's a symbol of washing away the old, staid ideals and bringing in new ideas that will help allow the younger generation to grow and thrive through progressive ideas.

 

Rain can also be scary and dark.  This is evident in genres like mystery, suspense and horror and in the noir style of filmmaking.  

 

Rain can also be romantic, like in Spiderman and Breakfast at Tiffany's.  To an extent the rain scene in Casablanca is romantic even though Bogart is heartbroken.  They were planning on leaving on the train together to marry.  Bogart is so excited to marry Bergman only to have her break his heart.  His anguish is intense because of how much he loves her.

 

Rain can also be fun, like in Singin' in the Rain.  Rain puddles elicit a childlike innocence and the joy that can come from splashing around is infectious.  It's hard to watch Gene Kelly singing and dancing his heart out in the rain and not instantly feel happier. 

 

Rain can have varying degrees of intensity (in Oregon we have weather reports that will state the week will contain trace rain, drizzle, showers, rain, heavy rain, and heavy showers... all of this in one week!).  The scarier rain will be heavy and often accompanied by lightning and thunder.  The nicer rain will just be a heavy drizzle but often in the daylight, like in romantic films.  

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Reminds me of all the times Northwest Airlines would send this L.A. boy to their headquarters in Minneapolis for business...in JANUARY!!!

 

Yep, and I remember each and every time I'd step out of the MSP terminal to get on my hotel shuttle bus I'd think to myself..."HOW IN THE HELL DO YOU LOCALS AROUND HERE LIVE IN THIS CRAPPY COLD WEATHER FOR AT LEAST FIVE MONTHS OUT OF EVERY FREAKIN' YEAR???"!!!

 

(...hell, if it rained more than 3 or 4 days in a row in L.A., I'd start getting "cabin fever", 'cause I couldn't either be out on the tennis court, at the beach, OR ridin' one of my motorcycles around...nope, I just never got why ANYONE would choose to him the frozen freakin' TUNDRA!!!)

 

I suppose we're derailing the thread, discussing our weather preferences like this when it's supposed to be about rain in movies - and there are many movies in which rain - or the lack of it - plays an important part.

 

But anyway...don't get me wrong, Dargs baby, I do not like cold. And I'm not an all-precipitation equal rights activist, either. Nope, just rain. I don't like snow, sleet, or hail. And I'm not big on cold rain that wants to turn into snow.

My favourite kind of weather is when it's mild but not hot, about 20 degrees (uh, about 70 American), and cloudy, with at least an hour or so of soft gentle rain. A clear blue sky feels harsh to me.

(I know, I know, everyone here will think I'm crazy...)

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Great post, speedy !

 

I'll just add that, as someone (cave girl, maybe??) mentioned earlier, film noir movies are all about rain; there are probably more noirs with rain in them than without.

 

The Big Sleep comes to mind; I don't think there's one scene where it's not either raining, just about to rain, or just finished raining. It's such a fun scene where the book shop girl closes the store for the day to hang out with Bogie - and of course, it's raining outside !

 

There's something beautifully atmospheric and mysterious about rain-soaked streets in noir. Maybe that's one reason why I like rain so much - it makes me feel like I'm in my own personal film noir scene !

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I suppose we're derailing the thread, discussing our weather preferences like this when it's supposed to be about rain in movies - and there are many movies in which rain - or the lack of it - plays an important part.

 

But anyway...don't get me wrong, Dargs baby, I do not like cold. And I'm not an all-precipitation equal rights activist, either. Nope, just rain. I don't like snow, sleet, or hail. And I'm not big on cold rain that wants to turn into snow.

My favourite kind of weather is when it's mild but not hot, about 20 degrees (uh, about 70 American), and cloudy, with at least an hour or so of soft gentle rain. A clear blue sky feels harsh to me.

(I know, I know, everyone here will think I'm crazy...)

 

Naaah...they'll probably just think you're "a good Canadian", THAT'S all!

 

LOL

 

;)

 

(...btw, and speakin' o' which...next week I'll be up north of the 49th to visit my "Ma" in beautiful Kelowna B.C....hope it doesn't rain)

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...Rain can also be romantic..

 

Uh-huh...like in 1994's FOUR WEDDINGS AND A FUNERAL, featuring that ageless beauty Andie MacDowell here...

 

article-2301060-18FDFE76000005DC-42_634x

 

(...oh, and that Limey dude here too, of course)

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-In Key Largo, it's raining throughout the entire film.

 

Not so! That beginning bit with Bogie on the bus was a completely precip free zone! ;p

(Though, it does suddenly get much, much cloudier just after the bus leaves the bridge & gets stopped by the police.)

 

Rain can be a very effective emotional cue, especially when so many movie/TV scenes are in carefully crafted technicolor brightness. When they take the trouble to shoot a rainy scene, you almost know something different is on the cards (except perhaps, when the rain is a little too obviously faked). If they ever invent an effective smell-o-vision effect & manage to recreate the smell of freshly distributed rain, the movie experience will be complete...

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In the Tuesday Weld thread I mentioned SOLDIER IN THE RAIN.

 

Elaine learns of Benjamin's diddling her mother during a rainstorm in THE GRADUATE.  

 

OK, so how about THE ILLUSTRATED MAN?

 

OK, maybe not that significant, but for a touch of comic relief, Melvyn Douglas getting stranded at the new Blandings house during a rainstorm during the recently broadcasted MR. BLANDONGS BUILDS HIS DREAMHOUSE, and telling cofused droppers by , "Friend of the family.  Came in out of the rain."

 

OK,  how abut BRANDO, on bended knees, crying "STELLA!"  with rain getting him soaked?

 

 

Sepiatone

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If there hadn't been that downpour perhaps poor Janet

Leigh would not have in her confusion left the main highway

and wound up on the road to the Bates Motel, and met

Normie, who even brought out an umbrella to keep her

dry. He turned out to be not much of a gentleman.

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CG, I adore the notion of rain in/on film; several years ago, at the height of drought conditions in my part of the country; I devoted a post to rain washed films on my (now defunct) blog. A (somewhat ) lesser-known film by Hiroshi Shimizu, The Masseurs and A Woman (1938), and Akira Kurosawa's One Wonderful Sunday (1947) both inspired my thoughts on rainy days and Sundays. I included a reference to the rain sequence in Blade Runner (1982), which is one of the more visually poetic depictions. I also included three versions of the film with the title Rain: the first starring Gloria Swanson (1929), the second starring Joan Crawford (1932), the third directed by Joris Regen (1929), image below. I also can't imagine film noir without rain washed streets and the sound of falling rain punctuating some tough guy's patois.

 

giphy.gif

Thanks, WG for such a beautifully expressed post. I certainly wish I had enjoyed the opportunity to read your sadly now defunct blog.

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Well, it's raining in the final scene of Breakfast at Tiffany's.  Sentimental though it may be (but actually I don't think it is), it's hard to resist that final shot of Holly, Paul, and the cat, all three soaking wet and hugging each other. 

 

Incidentally, I love rain. Aside from the movies (and I love rainy scenes in movies), I just love rainy days. I actually prefer them to sunny ones, most of the time. Of course, one can have too much of a good thing. But in general, I love misty grey cloudy days, and if there's a little rain there too, so much the better. Rainy days are so much more interesting than clear blue sky sunny ones. And we need rain. I never understand why people complain when it's rainy -especially if a rainy day follows a week of sunny ones.

Yes, MissW that scene in BAT is a winner!

 

I like rain too, but not so much that it blows my umbrella away. Just wondering, what's your favorite "rainy" movie? "The Umbrellas of Cherbourg" or ???

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Reminds me of all the times Northwest Airlines would send this L.A. boy to their headquarters in Minneapolis for business...in JANUARY!!!

 

Yep, and I remember each and every time I'd step out of the MSP terminal to get on my hotel shuttle bus I'd think to myself..."HOW IN THE HELL DO YOU LOCALS AROUND HERE LIVE IN THIS CRAPPY COLD WEATHER FOR AT LEAST FIVE MONTHS OUT OF EVERY FREAKIN' YEAR???"!!!

 

(...hell, if it rained more than 3 or 4 days in a row in L.A., I'd start getting "cabin fever", 'cause I couldn't either be out on the tennis court, at the beach, OR ridin' one of my motorcycles around...nope, I just never got why ANYONE would choose to him the frozen freakin' TUNDRA...OH, and I never received all that great an answer to my query whenever I'd ask 'em...well, OTHER than that one about "enjoying the four seasons", anyway...although it seems EVENTUALLY there's many of 'em who FINALLY figure out they DON'T and move to the sunbelt...funny, ain't it?!!!) ;)

Dargo, Prince said he lived in Minneapolis because it was so cold that it kept "dangerous" people out.

 

Uh, I guess your visits predated his comments!

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As a native Oregonian, if there's one thing I know about... it's rain.

 

Some of my favorite rain scenes have already been mentioned (Singin' in the Rain and Breakfast at Tiffany's).  

 

-There's always the corny "love scene" between Spiderman and Mary Jane in the Tobey Maguire Spiderman series.  You know the one where it's pouring and Spiderman is hanging upside down and Mary Jane pulls his mask back so his mouth is exposed and they share a romantic smooch in the rain.

 

-In Jurassic Park, the epic T-Rex scene is set in the rain.

 

-Humphrey Bogart standing in the rain at the train station reading Ingrid Bergman's "Dear John" letter in Casablanca.

 

-In Clue, it's raining outside for I believe the entire film.

 

-In Rocky Horror Picture Show, Brad and Janet have to run through the rain and end up taking refuge in Dr. Frank N Furter's castle. 

 

-In Key Largo, it's raining throughout the entire film.

 

-It also rains throughout The Spiral Staircase

 

-In Cape Fear (1962), a huge thunderstorm hits at the climax of the film when Gregory Peck is trying to trap Robert Mitchum.

 

-In Pleasantville, a major pivotal moment in the film is when it rains for the first time. This new experience excites the younger generation and angers the older generation.  It is after the rainstorm when the town's transformation from black and white to color really starts to speed up.  

 

It's interesting how rain can be symbolic, like in Pleasantville, it's a symbol of washing away the old, staid ideals and bringing in new ideas that will help allow the younger generation to grow and thrive through progressive ideas.

 

Rain can also be scary and dark.  This is evident in genres like mystery, suspense and horror and in the noir style of filmmaking.  

 

Rain can also be romantic, like in Spiderman and Breakfast at Tiffany's.  To an extent the rain scene in Casablanca is romantic even though Bogart is heartbroken.  They were planning on leaving on the train together to marry.  Bogart is so excited to marry Bergman only to have her break his heart.  His anguish is intense because of how much he loves her.

 

Rain can also be fun, like in Singin' in the Rain.  Rain puddles elicit a childlike innocence and the joy that can come from splashing around is infectious.  It's hard to watch Gene Kelly singing and dancing his heart out in the rain and not instantly feel happier. 

 

Rain can have varying degrees of intensity (in Oregon we have weather reports that will state the week will contain trace rain, drizzle, showers, rain, heavy rain, and heavy showers... all of this in one week!).  The scarier rain will be heavy and often accompanied by lightning and thunder.  The nicer rain will just be a heavy drizzle but often in the daylight, like in romantic films.  

Wow, SR I'd totally forgotten about that scene in "Pleasantville" but you make a good point.

 

Thanks for all your many submissions!

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I suppose we're derailing the thread, discussing our weather preferences like this when it's supposed to be about rain in movies - and there are many movies in which rain - or the lack of it - plays an important part.

 

But anyway...don't get me wrong, Dargs baby, I do not like cold. And I'm not an all-precipitation equal rights activist, either. Nope, just rain. I don't like snow, sleet, or hail. And I'm not big on cold rain that wants to turn into snow.

My favourite kind of weather is when it's mild but not hot, about 20 degrees (uh, about 70 American), and cloudy, with at least an hour or so of soft gentle rain. A clear blue sky feels harsh to me.

(I know, I know, everyone here will think I'm crazy...)

Ya know, what Rose Kennedy said, Miss W.:

 

 "The birds still sing after the rain."

 

I don't think that would have gotten me through all the tragedies but I guess it worked for her.

 

But since you LIKE rain so much, for you the quote should be:

 

"The birds still sing after a clear blue sky."

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In the Tuesday Weld thread I mentioned SOLDIER IN THE RAIN.

 

Elaine learns of Benjamin's diddling her mother during a rainstorm in THE GRADUATE.  

 

OK, so how about THE ILLUSTRATED MAN?

 

OK, maybe not that significant, but for a touch of comic relief, Melvyn Douglas getting stranded at the new Blandings house during a rainstorm during the recently broadcasted MR. BLANDONGS BUILDS HIS DREAMHOUSE, and telling cofused droppers by , "Friend of the family.  Came in out of the rain."

 

OK,  how abut BRANDO, on bended knees, crying "STELLA!"  with rain getting him soaked?

 

 

Sepiatone

Oh, yeah Brando looked really good in the rain, Sepia!

 

Excuse me, just reread your post and saw you wrote "Mr. Blandongs"!

 

Sorry but I'm really surprised that typo did not get deleted. Could be a whole new movie starring Harry Reems.

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