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Ah, to be on the Big Screen


NickAndNora34
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I think it's great how TCM has been putting certain classic movies on the big screen through Fathom Events, although I can honestly say I've only seen Gone with the Wind about a year and a half to two years ago out of the ones they've presented.

 

I was by far the youngest person in the theater audience lol. But it was absolutely spectacular to be able to see this 1939 film the way it was meant to be seen. Re-watching this film helped me remember just how much I love Vivien Leigh. And how wonderful of a storyteller Margaret Mitchell was.

 

I am planning on going to see On the Waterfront with Marlon Brando, as I have never seen it (I'm young, remember)

 

Thoughts?

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Well, I'm a huge fan of On the Waterfront, and while I haven't seen it on the big screen, I can't imagine it will be as visually appealing as Gone with the Wind was. On the Waterfront is dark and gritty and dirty and gloomy, which fits the story and the intended mood. I hope you enjoy it, though. I know I would!

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I was going to see On the Waterfront yesterday (I haven't seen it either, but I do believe I'm a bit older than you, but still at the younger end of the spectrum here on the board), but I had to work for almost 6 hours (OT though, yay!) and that pretty much sucked up all my energy.  I came home and made soup and watched The Major and the Minor instead.  On the Waterfront is a famous film though, so it'll surely repeat on TCM (I know, not the same as the big screen) and would be easy to obtain via Netflix or whatever source.

 

I see the TCM Fathom events on occasion, I was going to see Roman Holiday last November and Psycho last September and I completely forgot.  I went into auto-pilot on my way home from work and instead of going to the theater, I just went home and chilled.  Only to realize about an hour into the movie that "oh yeah, I was going to go to the theater."  

 

My husband and I did see The Maltese Falcon in February.  That was really fun.  We weren't the youngest ones, we were probably second youngest, lol.  

 

I saw Jaws last summer and the theater was packed, with all ages.  That was really exciting to watch on the big screen--especially since I was with a friend who hadn't seen it before.

 

I saw Double Indemnity alone last summer and I was the youngest one in the theater.

 

With Casablanca a few years ago, there were a lot of couples--my husband and I fit in perfectly.  Except I think most of these couples were on a date because their wives decided that it would be fun to go see a "romantic classic" film (that's what I overheard a few saying to their husbands, something to that effect anyway).  Me on the other hand, just love Casablanca and I made my husband go.  Haha.  

 

Singin' in the Rain was really fun too.  I think I've seen that movie in the theater like three times.  That movie brought out a lot of women and teenage girls.  I think my poor husband may have been one of like a dozen men and the theater was sold out. 

 

There's a theater in my hometown in Salem that shows classic films on Wednesday nights. They alternate talkies and silent films.  One week it's a talkie, the next a silent, and so-on.  I've seen a lot of other classics on the big screen there: From Here to Eternity, Sabrina, Saboteur, North By Northwest, Psycho, The Birds, Suspicion, The Adventures of Robin Hood, Gentleman Jim, Top Hat, Some Like it Hot, Touch of Evil, Bringing Up Baby, just to name a few.  For $5, they are a bargain.  Although it's usually a sea of white/gray hair and then myself and my parents, all of us who do not have white/gray hair.  Seeing The Adventures of Robin Hood on the big screen was especially exciting because the film (and ::cough:: leading man) is so gorgeous that it was such an exciting evening.  The theater was packed full of people of all ages for 'Robin Hood.'

 

I commend you for being able to sit through the almost 4-hour long Gone With the Wind in a theater.  As much as I love watching movies on the big screen, I don't know if I could sit in a theater seat or sit with theater people for such a long period of time.  I haven't seen Gone With the Wind yet, but I need to set aside a big chunk of time when I have nothing else to do, where I can recline on the couch with some refreshments and not fall asleep or get distracted--I'm not investing 4 hours of time into something, only to not know what happened at the end!

 

Anyway, to get back to what you were saying... I think that anytime you have the chance to see a classic on the big screen, then it's a worthwhile endeavor.  I'm happy to see that the classics seem to be having a bit of a renaissance and newer generations are interested in them and don't have blanket prejudices (e.g. black and white bias) that preclude them from seeing a great film.

 

Of this year's remaining Fathom installments:

 

-On the Waterfront (ooh I thought it was on 4/21 & 4/24 but it was 4/24 & 4/27, I still have a chance) ***MAYBE*** I'm not the biggest Marlon Brando Fan, but this film is considered a classic, so I'd like to see it.

 

-Ferris Bueller's Day Off.  Meh, I like the movie (I own the movie), but I don't think it's "theater worthy." 

 

-Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. I like this movie too (I own it as well), but I don't know if I need to see it in the theater.  I think Veruca is my spirit twin, but I'm not needing to see this movie, NOW.

 

-Planet of the Apes.  Meh. Next.

 

-The King and I.  While I would be interested in seeing the film.  I haven't seen it and the last time I tried to watch Rogers and Hammerstein (South Pacific), I wanted to gouge my eyes out with a spoon.  It may be better to wait to record this film so that I'm not trapped into watching it in the theater if I can't handle it.

 

-Dr. Strangelove... Eh.

 

-The Shining, Eh.

 

-Breakfast at Tiffany's.  I own this film.  I've seen it a hundred times, but I love this movie.  A resounding yes from me.  I'll definitely need to buy my tickets in advance, I forsee a lot of teenage/20 something women "big Audrey Hepburn fans" (but none of whom could probably name a single one of her other films aside from 'Tiffany's' and who otherwise have no interest in classic film) buying up all the tickets.  A whole room full of women may make me want to rip my hair out, but we'll see what happens.  

 

-From Here to Eternity. Yes! I love this movie.  No doubt this movie will attract a lot of couples for "date night" during the busy Christmastime season.  "Oh the beach scene is so romantic!" Yes, it is, but can you imagine ACTUALLY doing that?! Ick.  It would most definitely not be romantic.  

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I commend you for being able to sit through the almost 4-hour long Gone With the Wind in a theater.  As much as I love watching movies on the big screen, I don't know if I could sit in a theater seat or sit with theater people for such a long period of time.  I haven't seen Gone With the Wind yet, but I need to set aside a big chunk of time when I have nothing else to do, where I can recline on the couch with some refreshments and not fall asleep or get distracted--I'm not investing 4 hours of time into something, only to not know what happened at the end!

 

 

The King and I.  While I would be interested in seeing the film.  I haven't seen it and the last time I tried to watch Rogers and Hammerstein (South Pacific), I wanted to gouge my eyes out with a spoon.  It may be better to wait to record this film so that I'm not trapped into watching it in the theater if I can't handle it.

The only Rodgers and Hammerstein movie musical I was 100% invested in was obviously Sound of Music (1965). I first watched it when I was about 3 or 4, and I have probably seen it at least 50 times throughout my life time lol. (The only one that might come close to beating that, is possibly My Fair Lady, which I first watched around the same time).

 

The King and I is a good story, with great music. I was fortunate to see a community theatre production that was very well done. I know it's back on Broadway, which is probably one reason why TCM decided to put it on the big screen, as it is slightly more relevant.

The thing with Rodgers and Hammerstein movie musicals is that the scores for South Pacific, Carousel, Oklahoma are fantastic, but these three films are lacking an actual story. They bored me to tears. I love Sound of Music, and I liked State Fair and The King and I.

I honestly can't say how much I hated Oklahoma. I watched about 10 minutes of it, and was expecting much more out of it, to be honest.

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  • 1 month later...

As many of you know, I am a big proponent of seeing movies in a theater setting. Last night we saw a silly fluff film, but with a group laughing, it adds to your own enjoyment.


And unless I'm with an audience, I fall asleep in silent films!


 


Speedy's list:


 


Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. 


 


We saw this a couple of years ago Father's Day on 35mm. Although I've seen it several times before-first in a theater when it first came out- seeing it this time it actually made me cry. Plus, you see a LOT more details on the big screen.


(the man who played Charlie lives nearby & attended as well!)


 


-The King and I.  


 


I highly recommend this one on the big screen.


The Eastman was showing AN AMERICAN IN PARIS once and I went even though I had seen it a million times before. It was like an ENTIRELY different movie, with an audience & big screen.


It's a very cute story and I'm sure the costumes & sets are gorgeous. The music takes a back seat, thankfully.


 


-Dr. Strangelove... Eh.


 


-The Shining, Eh.


 


I saw BOTH of those in a theater first, and again, they are like totally different movies on the big screen with an audience.


It's really too bad so many scenes in THE SHINING have been parodied, it takes a lot of the impact out.


 


-From Here to Eternity


 


I'd go to see that one in a theater in a heartbeat. Bonus if 35mm.


 


My biggest issue with the Fathom events is they hold them at our maul theater. I refuse to step foot in that multiplex and limit my time in the maul to 20 minutes to pick up/deliver work or get a paycheck.


 


Now more than ever I avoid crowds.

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...My biggest issue with the Fathom events is they hold them at our maul theater. I refuse to step foot in that multiplex and limit my time in the maul to 20 minutes to pick up/deliver work or get a paycheck.

 

Now more than ever I avoid crowds.

 

 

Hmmmmm...a "maul" theater, huh Tiki?

 

Yep, I'll bet the mosh pit at THOSE kind of venues are probably especially hard on the ol' body, huh. Yep, I doubt I could even last TEN minutes in that kind of thing at my age now days.

 

(...sorry...couldn't resist)

 

;)

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

 

As many of you know, I am a big proponent of seeing movies in a theater setting. Last night we saw a silly fluff film, but with a group laughing, it adds to your own enjoyment.

And unless I'm with an audience, I fall asleep in silent films!

 

 

I grew up back in the days when there were still college revival theaters like the Metro in NYC and the Harvard Square in Boston, who existed just to play a different double-feature vintage classic every day.

My own local was an independent theater in the Boston suburbs, whose theater looked like a neighborhood private house on the outside, and pretty much on the inside too--They offered a "10-admission" card of ten punch tickets for $30 (this was back in the early 80's days of $3 admissions), and weeknight showings between current trendy arthouse discoveries would be the pre-TCM revivals of old cult-revival MGM classics:

It was the first place I saw Forbidden Planet (in a double with The Time Machine), Singin' in the Rain (in a double with Oz), my dad insisted on taking me to This Island Earth, back when that was considered a classic, and I had already seen A Night at the Opera, but you can't see that with a new audience enough times.

 

What worries me is that with Warner behind TCM Fathom--and their fears that there are only a few old "key" catalog movies people actually want to watch or buy (which is why an old-movie Blu set will be sold with Singin', Oz, Robin Hood or Casablanca as a "ringer")--there's a growing tunnel-vision about what movies people actually REMEMBER.

Yes, it's nice to see Double Indemnity on the screen, until it becomes virtually the only black-and-white movie Warner wants to use to symbolize The Forties, When They Had Noir.  Jaws now singlehandedly symbolizes The Seventies, and we're coming into a decade that believes that Ferris Bueller was the most important movie of the 80's, as John Hughes clearly directed every movie of the decade except for Ghostbusters and Back to the Future.

Old movies are getting TCM Fathom exposure, but it seems like they're also being apologized for, like the parent who tries to accept that their kids won't eat anything but chicken nuggets and mac-and-cheese.

 

(Sorry, I'm getting way off onto some of the movie-literacy soapbox issues I save for my own blog, but those of us who can't get TCM on the non-premium tier channels see this as more of an issue.)

 

And I remember seeing the 1984 Giorgio Moroder reissue of Metropolis and the recent Criterion upgrade of Safety Last in theaters, and a silent movie works much better with an audience.

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