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disgusted

TCM commercial

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Welllllllllllll............based on Raygun's website, it looks like the next promo is called 'TCM Underground -- hosted by Rob Zombie'.

 

I have a sneaking suspicion we're all going to be back here talking about it!

 

:)

 

P.S. Anyone know which of these is the Robert Montgomery video, or if any of these is really good?.........

 

FUTURE SHOCK

HOLLYWOOD PRODUCERS

BEING BUT MEN HOLIDAY ID

SCREEN ON THE GREEN

GRETA GARBO

ORSON WELLES

HOLLYWOOD MUSICALS

FACE THE FEAR

THE ESSENTIALS 2006

FOLLOW THE SIGNS IMAGE PROMO

CINEMATOGRAPHERS IN FOCUS

CRIME WAVE

SCORSESE ON SCORSESE

MARCH MOVIE MADNESS

RACE AND HOLLYWOOD

LEADING LADIES HD

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Stoney,

 

The Being But Men Holiday promo is one of my favorites.

The Greta Garbo one (if it's from when she was SOTM earlier this year) is very good.

Hollywood Musicals, Scorsese on Scorscese, Hollywood and Race, Crime Wave and Leading Ladies are all quite good.

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I do emphatically not like the commercial.The worst promo I think was the year end tribute to all the stars and directors who've died during the year.I think showing a cheap blonde (junkie?prostitute?) smoking in a cheap motel showed no respect to any of the people shown. Quit trying to be MTV.

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People should watch out what they say about Punks....just like people not all punks are the same...I pay alot more than 50 bucks a month for my cable..just to have TCM, retroplex and the westerns channell.....Plus I have over 400 classic films on DVD and VHS..so to say that Punks or goths dont spend money on classic films is an untrue statement...The girl in the promo is not a punkrocker...she is not a goth....she is just a trendy looking gap wearing model that probably looks alot like all of you than me,...I have been into the classics longer than I have been a punkrocker which is a long time....I am 34..I been into the classics since I was about 5 years old...I enjoyed watching B/W movies with my dad and my grandpa.....I have been a punk for 20 years....most real punks are highly intelligent....like I said before most people dont know what real punkrock is since the media

forces crap down your throat that they say is punkrock but is miles away from the real thing....my culture is very exploited....I am a punk but I am against Rob Zombie being on TCm....he is not a punk either... real punkrock is not commericially viable ...the song in the promo is not punk either...have some respect for me and dont talk crap about punks when real punk has nothing to do with this promo or any other media outlet you watch......

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Moira wrote:

"For the record, I'm hoping that TCM will give the tattoos and skin a rest, though I realize that their corporation, like all the rest, is constantly under pressure to court the desirable demographic that allegedly loves that stuff. Of course, it's probably not a bad thing to keep a diverse bunch--of all ages and tastes, coming to your little channel."

 

Moira brings up one thing that constantly puzzles me, and maybe someone here can answer it: If the majority of Americans will soon be older than 50, why is the younger demographic still the one most pursued? Aren't the older folks richer and therefore more likely to buy stuff?

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> Moira brings up one thing that constantly puzzles me,

> and maybe someone here can answer it: If the majority

> of Americans will soon be older than 50, why is the

> younger demographic still the one most pursued?

> Aren't the older folks richer and therefore more

> likely to buy stuff?

 

No, I don't think so. It's the young, inexperienced and acquisitive, who are the most easily influenced. We are much more careful with our money and with our opinions. But since there are going to be so many more of us in no time at all, you are absolutely right in thinking that we, not the Gen X-ers, should be the target audience of choice.

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Funny that you should mention the attitudes about marketing to the burgeoning over 50 crowd. Actually, there's an ongoing debate within the advertising/marketing community regarding the future role of boomers vs. traditional demographic beliefs that only those younger groups are worth catering to by the media. There's documentation indicating that it's pretty foolish to ignore 78 million boomers who control 70% of the nation's wealth, controlling half of the discretionary income in each household and spending approx. $2 trillion on consumer goods annually and, by 2010, adults 45 and older will outspend younger Americans by $1 trillion.

 

The age segment of the population that's 50-65 years of age will grow 70% within the next 15 years.Within that same period, the age group of 24-44 will actually shrink by about 4.3 million people, and that group will control less of the market than any time in modern history. And, being a slightly self-delusional crowd, we boomers will not go gently into that good night that advertisers see for us, especially since the average boomer considers middle age to be lasting until about 70-75 years of age now. I guess mortality is going to be a big shock for alot of my contemporaries someday.

 

If you'd like to check on any of these statistics, you might like to go to Google and key in "The Boomer Report", which should bring you to numerous marketing reports that will verify this info.

 

To make this long story short, just as young people skewed the country toward youthful concerns such as sex, drugs and rock and roll in the '60s and '70s, this enormous group within the general population is about to do it again, this time tilting the culture toward the more seasoned, (one can always hope, at least), preoccupations of older people. Hang on, it should get interesting.

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Interesting trends, Pilgrim, but I can't help but wonder, is it good or healthy for a society to be so influenced by one segment over another? I guess I'm looking at it from a philosophical viewpoint rather than a demographic or marketing one. Wouldn't it be best if culture were more diverse and celebrated the mix of people.

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Procreation and the timing of it will determine how one segment will influence. Whether it is healthy doesn't matter in the real world. Those with it are loathe to give it up. Your philosophical thought of celebrating the mix is laudable but the reality is people don't celebrate it. Advertising is about the dollar. You go after the people who have money and are willing to part with it.

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Have you watched MTV lately?

 

Nothing as good as this promo will ever be on that network.

 

And calling the actress and trendy looking idiot? Is that a great way to argue your point? By attacking the actress?

 

Marlon Brando was a weirdo, but yet I still enjoy his films. You can easily dislike the promo without making an attack on the person in it, couldn't you?

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It

> will always be contemporary even if we aren't. Don't

> be too upset when younger generations appropriate,

> explore, reassess, and reinterpret it in ways you

> don't like. It's a sign that cinema is alive and

> well, challenging, thrilling, amazing new audiences;

> telling our stories from our times. In this, we can

> live on long after we're gone.

 

 

stunningly put. Hear, Hear.

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> "My favorite types of promos are ones that use only

> scenes from the films."

 

Those kinds of promos, like the one for Double Indemnity and The Third Man, are called 'topical' promos (I know someone who works for another cable network). With those, you can can and should use only clips from the films.

 

But these all-encompassing "This Month on TCM" things, you can't just use the clips from the movies. There has to be something that ties together such disparate themes as "WillIam Holden," "Janus films" and "Movie Shorts."

 

Otherwise, it would just be a collage of clips with no meaning.

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"Otherwise, it would just be a collage of clips with no meaning."

 

But isn't that precisely what this promo is anyway?

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?But these all-encompassing "This Month on TCM" things, you can't just use the clips from the movies. There has to be something that ties together such disparate themes as "WillIam Holden," "Janus films" and "Movie Shorts."?

 

No there doesn?t. Promos for these films don?t need a tattooed dame with a brass telescope gimmick to ?tie? them together. They aren?t ?tied? together in the dame promo. The dame with the telescope interferes with the scenes of the old films. Anyway, she?s holding the telescope incorrectly, causing it to droop. Collapsible telescopes must be held in the center or with both hands.

 

TCM could have done this promo with three separate themed promos or one long promo with three sections to it.

 

I made many promos over the years while in the news business. News, documentary, feature, all kinds of promos.

 

?Otherwise, it would just be a collage of clips with no meaning.?

 

The narrator or titles tell us the meaning and connection. That?s what narrators and titles are for.

 

Did that tattooed lady tell us what the promo was for? No. I thought it was mainly for Janus. It was not a good promo for TCM.

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Meaning is up to the beholder. You can't consciously create 'meaning' to something, but you can attempt a narrative arc that might suggest something going on subtextually. Now, you might disagree with it, but you can't say that the promo doesn't need something other than just a collage of clips. Otherwise it's a family photo album, which some folks might want.

 

And the holding the telescope business...not only is she a '****' but now she can't hold the telescope correctly?

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Promos for these films don?t need a

> tattooed dame with a brass telescope gimmick to ?tie?

> them together.

 

So this promo didn't need something to tie it together, eh? Well what made the much-vaunted Myrna Loy--three windows--falling leaves thing from several years ago so effective? That is, if it wasn't the three windows and falling leaves? (you know, the theme that tied together Loy with Ulmer, Carl Dreyer, and one other one)

 

Or how about the Year End parade of dead people from three years ago, the one with the candles? Would that have made a better piece without the candles?

 

When promos are simply clip, clip, clip, clip, info, clip, clip, clip, info, that's not something artfully done. It's sloppiness aspiring to be a Wal-Mart ad.

 

> The dame with the telescope interferes

> with the scenes of the old films.

 

If she were inserted into the actual films, then she'd be interfering.

 

 

> TCM could have done this promo with three separate

> themed promos or one long promo with three sections

> to it.

 

It IS one long promo with three sections to it.

 

 

> The narrator or titles tell us the meaning and

> connection. That?s what narrators and titles are

> for.

 

No, it's the script that suggests meaning and connection. The narrator reads the script. Titles give us hard facts, like when the spotlighted festivals are on.

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?Meaning is up to the beholder. You can't consciously create 'meaning' to something, but you can attempt a narrative arc that might suggest something going on subtextually. Now, you might disagree with it, but you can't say that the promo doesn't need something other than just a collage of clips. Otherwise it's a family photo album, which some folks might want.?

 

No, no, no. Of course the promo needed artistic editing, music, and perhaps narration too, like the ?Double Indemnity? and ?The Third Man? promos.

 

As a promo maker and artist myself, I say the tattooed dame promo advertised the tattooed dame more than it advertised what it was supposed to advertise.

 

For example, can you remember any of the specific b&w films the promo promoted?

 

No, the promo promoted the tattooed dame more than anything else. It made people wonder, ?Who is she?? ?Is she topless at the end?? ?Is she going to jump off the balcony?? ?Is there a man in the room with her?? ?What movie is this scene from? It looks like a neo-noir, I gotta see it!?

 

Now, what could have done was.... start out with the cu of Erich von Stroheim?s hands playing Bach?s Toccata and Fugue in D Minor on the organ in Norma Desmond?s mansion. We could hold that scene for 7 or 8 seconds, and then William Holden walks into the room. Then we could cut to appropriate images of William Holden other films to promote him as the star of the month, while keeping the same music in the bg for a while. We could continue the same music through the Janus and short-film section of the promo, or we could do a sound-dissolve to other music from the various films. The topics of the promo could be covered with titles or a narration.

 

In the promo they did produce, the actual ?classic movies? are quite secondary to what the dame is doing. They tried to mix oil and water but it didn?t work.

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?It IS one long promo with three sections to it.?

 

Yeah, 1) the dame lights a cigarette, 2) she looks through a bent telescope, 3) she goes out on the balcony.

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It was not a good promo for TCM.

 

I disagree. I remembered TCM after seeing it. No, I didn't remember the movies. But I now can listen to MUSE and Radiohead and enjoy them whereas a week or so ago I didn't know these bands.

 

I remembered TCM after hearing Chet Baker's Look For The Silver Lining, I didn't remember what went on in the clip.

 

I remembered Little Richard after seeing the GEICO commercial, somebody had to remind me that it was for GEICO.

 

I liked it. I remembered TCM. We're arguing on behalf of TCM, giving lots and lots and lots of 'eyeballs' to their website. So, mission accomplished, no?

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?I disagree. I remembered TCM after seeing it. No, I didn't remember the movies.?

 

Well, that?s my point. No one remembers the movies shown in the promo. Everyone remembers the blonde lady with the tattoo, but they don?t remember the films being promoted. I don?t need a promo of a blonde lady with a tattoo to remember TCM.

 

I think one of the best promos TCM ever did was the ?Looking for Lulu? promo, done mainly by projecting still pictures of Louise Brooks onto a large gently-waving white sheet, with a wonderful mysterious voice tell us about the upcoming documentary.

 

?I remembered Little Richard after seeing the GEICO commercial, somebody had to remind me that it was for GEICO.?

 

I keep my remote-control clicker by my hand at all times so I can kill the sound on all GEICO commercials. I?m not the type of guy to trust an insurance company that has Little Richard and a danged animated lizard doing its commercials.

 

But, of course, we are all debating ?art? here, and different styles of ?art?, and no one can say which one of us is right. I suppose we would all have to do our own promos and then show them to the folks here and get their opinions. They might possibly like all of them.

 

?I liked it. I remembered TCM. We're arguing on behalf of TCM, giving lots and lots and lots of 'eyeballs' to their website. So, mission accomplished, no??

 

Yes, of course. Where else can nice people get together to debate ?what is art in cinema?.

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but you do remember its a TCM's promo, exactly what you saw and what network did it..

 

FredCDobbs, there's no cigarette lighting in the promo by the woman holding the telescope. What promo are looking at?

 

For something with so much response,

as a promo creator, I'm surprised you don't see this promo as, very successful.

Its gotten your attention.

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>Well, that?s my point. No one remembers the movies shown in the promo. >Everyone remembers the blonde lady with the tattoo, but they don?t remember >the films being promoted. I don?t need a promo of a blonde lady with a tattoo to >remember TCM.

 

I remember the movies, Seventh Seal, La Belle et Le Bete, something with what appeard to be HedyLamarr, San Francisco, Sunset Boulevard, a Chaplin film, Yojimbo (can't tell), and what I later discovered to be Aleksandr Nevskiy, plus some shorts and a few films I didn't recognize

 

I saw these images and the ones I knew of I was happy to recognize but I was intrigued by those I didn't know, some of them absolutely stunning. I'd love to know what that film has the person sliding sideways along a wall.

 

This is what these trailers do so well, they inspire people to want to find the film that matches the images because they look so good.

 

As for any narrative in the structure of the promo I'd say it involves a woman who finds her life dull and empty despite having a great apartment, a naked hunk in bed, and gourmet coffee. She does not appear to take pleasure in the vaccuum cleaning but then few people do. No matter what she does she can't tear herself away from what's going on, "out there." She's a voyeur and like most voyeurs, she becomes so enrapt that she eventually becomes overwhelmed with yearning to take part, hence she goes out on the balcony to be just a little bit closer to where the action is.

 

I also think this is a sly reference to the classic, Peeping Tom, which has been shown a few times on TCM. Peeping Tom has quite a controversial history and one of the more anticipated classic film releases. It involves a voyeur who likes to observe young women then kill them. The promo reverses the roles a bit and one might imagine the man in her bed to be doing something a little more permanent than sleeping.

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Re: what does a tattooed lady have to do with the classic movies . . .I like TCM's promos, (although I could have done without the striptease portion). . . although I seem to prefer the old black and whites to anything of recent vintage, whoever is making the TCM promos is doing an amazing job. They're edgy and avaunt guard like little French new wave films. People who need things spelled out or are stuck in one genre are so boring!

 

These promos are more like little videos than commercials and the music is better than anything I hear on the FM. Most people have eclectic tastes, and how you going to lure a new generation to how fabulous and important classic films are, if you use the same tired style of advertising. You are stuck in the "Leave it to Beaver" era . . Grow up, you boy scout.

 

I only have one kvetch about the promos . . . When you had Elizabeth Taylor as start of the month 2 mos. ago, I got sick onto death of the same promo voiced over by Paul Newman. Can't you mix it up a little? Is that the only tribute clip you have? 1 per star? . . I love Liz too but at the end of the month I think I could have recited it verbatim. .

 

The end of the year retrospective tributes of stars that we have lost absolutely makes me tear up, they are so poignant. Thank God we have these pearls that will immortalize an era that we won't ever see again. It makes me nauseous to think about a classic like Lost Horizon with its missing reels. That no one had the foresight to preserve it in its entirety. Everybody send a buck or two to the film preservation institute and check your garage and attic so we can find and preserve these gems!

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