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Interesting Actors on Classic TV Westerms


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Last week an episode of "Wagon Train" was shown featuring a guest appearance by comedian Lou Costello (he had broken up with Abbott a few years before). He plays a drunk who travels with a little girl and he ends up accused of murder. He does a nice job in this dramatic role. Unfortunately he would be dead not long after this so he would not a get a chance to do more drama.

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2 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Last week an episode of "Wagon Train" was shown featuring a guest appearance by comedian Lou Costello (he had broken up with Abbott a few years before). He plays a drunk who travels with a little girl and he ends up accused of murder. He does a nice job in this dramatic role. Unfortunately he would be dead not long after this so he would not a get a chance to do more drama.

Yea,  I saw that an Abbott was very good.     He also looked well,  e.g. not too old or tired looking.    Yea, sad that he died and we don't have the chance to see him in more drama (or anything).

 

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Yesterday, on MeTV, on "Have Gun-Will Travel", there was a terrific episode that guest-starred Vincent Price and Patricia Morrison as two "ham" actors who insisted on bringing "Othello" to a small, wild Western town. 

Believe it or not, despite Palladin's protests, they succeeded in getting appreciation for Shakespeare.

Price, Morrison and Boone were enjoying themselves immensely.

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1 hour ago, rayban said:

Yesterday, on MeTV, on "Have Gun-Will Travel", there was a terrific episode that guest-starred Vincent Price and Patricia Morrison as two "ham" actors who insisted on bringing "Othello" to a small, wild Western town. 

Believe it or not, despite Palladin's protests, they succeeded in getting appreciation for Shakespeare.

Price, Morrison and Boone were enjoying themselves immensely.

Well we appear to watch the same T.V. programming!    I had turned to this show but started cooking so I wasn't paying attention and then I heard that VOICE;   Vincent of course but it didn't sound like it was from a western.    Yea, Othello, isn't a typical western 'vibe'. 

I delayed my cooking and watched this.   Fun time for all! 

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13 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Well we appear to watch the same T.V. programming!    I had turned to this show but started cooking so I wasn't paying attention and then I heard that VOICE;   Vincent of course but it didn't sound like it was from a western.    Yea, Othello, isn't a typical western 'vibe'. 

I delayed my cooking and watched this.   Fun time for all! 

I was having so much fun - I could've sat through a longer episode.

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Today, on MeTV, on "Bonanza", there was an interesting episode that guest-starred Randy Boone.

Randy Boone made quite an impression in his day - and, in this one, he plays the guitar and sings, too.

The story, which was multi-layered, concerned a young man who was determined to get at the truth of his father's hanging, for which he blamed Ben Cartwright (Lorne Greene).

As it turned out, the woman whose husband was killed in the incident and for whose death the father was hanged, confessed to a full account of the incident - the father was guilty of the murder.

She was running off with Randy Boone's father (her lover) and her husband was killed in trying to stop them.

Randy Boone had feigned an accident and then claimed Ben had tried to kill him.

He was determined to bring Ben to justice for his father's death.

In the end, he had to accept the truth about his father - a man who was stealing another man's wife, committed a murder and was hanged for it.

Revenge has never been so sour.

randy-boone-us-actor-holding-an-acoustic
   

(Randy Boone is best-known for his appearances on "The Virginian".

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  • 4 weeks later...

Today, on MeTV, on "Gunsmoke", there was an extremely interesting episode about an outlaw (Anthony Zerbe) who killed an abusive husband (who was about to gun him down) and then fell in love with the dead man's wife (Salome Jens).

Both Anthony Zerbe and Salome Jens invested this somewhat melodramatic material with real feeling.

In the end, despite the odds, when they went off together, it couldn't have felt more right.

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1 hour ago, rayban said:

Today, on MeTV, on "Gunsmoke", there was an extremely interesting episode about an outlaw (Anthony Zerbe) who killed an abusive husband (who was about to gun him down) and then fell in love with the dead man's wife (Salome Jens).

Both Anthony Zerbe and Salome Jens invested this somewhat melodramatic material with real feeling.

In the end, despite the odds, when they went off together, it couldn't have felt more right.

I think Zerbe is a fantastic actor who does not get enough recognition.

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  • 4 months later...

I agree --to some extent--with the notion that 'we all perceive a movie or movies differently'. Although there's plenty of solid arguments I could mount against such a position. Still, its both fair to say, and wise to remember.

But that's as may be. There's still clearly a difference between each of our subjective reactions to a film experience, versus 'external ideas' that we receive from the culture surrounding us in this information age.

For instance, there's no way that hundreds of thousands of individual movie fans on their own, ever arrived at the idea that 'The Wizard of Oz' syncs exactly with the 'The Dark Side of the Moon'; nor did hundreds of thousands of music fans independently realize that 'The White Album' played backwards sounds a little like devil incantations.

These are things we 'heard about first' and which did not strike us spontaneously. Anyone ought to be able to agree with this distinction.

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  • 1 year later...

i recently watched a couple of episodes of Rawhide from season six dvd.  The episodes were named  Incident At Crucero and Incident of The Gilded Goddess.  Incident At Crucero basic plot was they had to drive cattle across an private range to find water for their herd. The leader of the private range denied them the right to cross over the range. The leader was played by a pre Samantha  Elizabeth Montgomery, who was very good in this role. I liked this episode  and  Gil Favor ( Eric Fleming) was able  to make a deal  with  Liz Montgomery  to cross the private range. The second episode  Incident  of The Gilded Goddess had  Dina Merrill, was on the run from the  law. As she shot an sheriff tried to avoid an posse. This was the first western that I seen Dina Merrill in and  I liked her performance in this episode. In summary, I really enjoyed  the two  Rawhide episodes.

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  • 3 months later...

The  Virginian  first  season  had  a  great  episode  called  The  Accomplice.  Bette  Davis  played  a crooked  bank  teller, who pinned Trampas  (Doug McClure)  with a  shooting and bank  robbery. Trampas  was  brought back  to  a town ,  to  face  charges stemming  from the bank  robbery. Bette  was   great in this role as the crooked bank teller. The  Virginian  ( James  Drury) travels  to this town  to help   set  Trampas  free. This  episode had  a  great court room scene and other good scenes in the episode. The other stars in The Accomplice  are  Lin McCarthy,  Gene  Evans,  Noah  Keen  and  Harold  Gould. I'm  giving  just  an  rough overview  of  the plot in this episode, to avoid spoiling  the viewing pleasure  for those  wishing  to see this episode. The  Accomplice  was  an  great episode  of  The Virginian and  provides  great viewing  pleasure.

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Two appearances that stand out to me is a rough, mean Buddy Hackett in the "Bloodlines" episode of "The Rifleman." The other one is Denver Pyle as the murderer /hangman in "The Hangman" episode of "The Rifleman." I keep hearing him yell "DON'T LET 'EM HANG ME, LUCAS! DON'T LET 'EM HANG ME!"

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7 hours ago, KidChaplin said:

Two appearances that stand out to me is a rough, mean Buddy Hackett in the "Bloodlines" episode of "The Rifleman." The other one is Denver Pyle as the murderer /hangman in "The Hangman" episode of "The Rifleman." I keep hearing him yell "DON'T LET 'EM HANG ME, LUCAS! DON'T LET 'EM HANG ME!"

Just this week I saw Buddy Hackett again on the Rifleman;  this time he was the town loser who had the job of cleaning saloons;  he was better with a mop then a gun!   (of course Lucas helps him regain his dignity).  

I also saw Bloodlines recently;   Hackett is good as the rough, mean, father who gets what is coming to him.    

I wasn't too surprised by these roles since Hackett was effective in 1958's God's Little Acre as Pluto Swint,  filmed a year or so before those Rifleman episodes.   

 

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Yeah, jamesjazz  

I saw the Hackett cleaning episode too. I just recently got into watching older shows like this and always knew Hackett as the jovial comedian from "Mad, Mad World", Johnny Carson appearances, etc.. When I saw him in "Bloodlines", I about fell off the couch. 😄

I am a big Andy Griffith Show fan and love to see a lot of the actors on there show up in other places. Denver Pyle (Briscoe Darling), John Qualen (Henry Bennett from "The Jinx" episode), and the actor in the TAGS color episodes who played the drug store owner when Opie gets the job at the soda fountain and breaks the perfume sample, all three show up in "Liberty Valance."

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