Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Sign in to follow this  
ekw

Golden Age survivor

Recommended Posts

I have been forced - virtually at mouse-point - to begin a thread somewhere on these boards by some TCM readers regarding my long association with the film industry. I am the son, grandson, and step-son of Keenan Wynn, Ed Wynn, and Van Johnson respectively. The suggestion - made gently but firmly (hmm...that didn't used to sound so lascivious) - is that because I knew a lot of people during Hollywood's so-called Golden Age - 1945 to around 1959, I might have anecdotes or thoughts on actors and films that could be of interest to movie buffs at TCM. And because my dad and stepfather were contract players at MGM from the early Forties until the mid-Fifties there might also be a heightened interest as that studio is associated very strongly with that period, not to mention TCM owns those films and plays them constantly. I hope that I can provide some fodder for commenters to munch on which hasn't already been munched into meusli.

 

I think I will start out by mentioning that of all my dad's friends, Lee Marvin was my closest "buddy" (I was about twenty years younger than he was), and I often went motorcycling with Lee and drinking with him, and sometimes - may it please the court and with sincere apologies to the world and MADD members (I am not being facetious here, I thank God every day I never struck anyone or injured anyone in those days) - doing both at the same time.

 

Lee was easily the coolest guy I ever met. McQueen, whom I also knew, was cool, but he couldn't hold a candle to Lee in that department. There's movie cool and there is no sh*t cool, and that was Lee. And he was the most fun to hang with. He really was in the Army and he really did get shot, and he was very modest about all that. I hadn't thought that I would start out with Lee, but he just popped into my mind for some reason. So I think I'll let it go at this point with one remark, Lee was not what people think of today as an actor, he was a dude, a regular guy who acted, much like Bob Mitchum (whose son, Jim, was a friend of mine in high school days) who never took no bull and did it his way as well (Mitchum was not a pal of my dad's, and whenever I saw him he was quite remote. Still, remote is like, the coolest, isn't it?). Guys like them were rare, and when you got to know one really well like I knew Lee, it was an honor though at the time, I didn't think of it much more than having a guy my father's age (about 8 years younger, I guess) who treated me like an equal. How cool is it to know a pal of your dad's who sees you as a real person and not a kid?

 

I also knew a lot of my mother?s friends, Van?s friends, and these were a lot of mainstream actors like Ty Power, Judy Garland and Roz Russell. Anyway, I will check back from time to time to see wuzzup. Lates, ekw.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the memories of Lee Marvin. Although I wouldn't characterize him as one of my favorite actors, I always enjoyed his acting and what he brought to his varied roles. I guess my favorite roles he played were in Cat Ballou, Donovan's Reef and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance. Three very different roles that were well portrayed by Mr. Marvin.

 

Looking forward for more reminiscences, ekw.

 

CharlieT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ned, I'm so glad you started this thread! Loved reading about Lee Marvin. I hadn't realized that Van Johnson was your step-father. He's one of my favorites from MGM.

 

please keep the memories coming.

 

thanks!

 

Sandy K

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey ekw . What a great story

You could pretty much count on people hear to want to know what you could share. I always liked Lee Marvin in The Dirty Dozen .I like your description of there's movie cool and ther's noSh*tcool . Inglis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad you guys like it. If you have something you want to ask, I shall endeavor to answer it as best I can. Remember, I was a pretty young kid during a lot of this though towards the end of the era I was a teenager. You need to keep that in mind.

 

Also, I wrote a book which is out of print now but which can be found at Amazon or eBay. It is called "We Will Always Live In Beverly Hills: Growing Up Crazy In Hollywood," by Ned Wynn (that's me). A lot of my reminiscences and funny stories are in that book (for instance skiing, or trying to ski, with Jack Nicholson in Aspen which was like riding bikes with Lee Marvin: Scary scary scary. I've had recurring nightmares about it for the past 20 years. The true coward in me was brought out by that). If you do decide to get a copy of the book (it was well-reviewed in the Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times) be sure and get a hardcover because there are a lot of pictures in the book, and you don't want the paperback in which the reproduction of the photos is really poor. I will probably be repeating anecdotes here that I wrote in that book. The photos are fun. Just a heads up. Ned

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Ned, it's good to have you on the boards.

I recently posted the birthday's of your father and step-father, two actors that I admire, and of course your grandpa.

How is your mother doing these days? I once read that she was writing a book about her years in Hollywood. Did she ever write it?

I've seen pictures of your mom at some terrific get-to-gethers (partys) and the place was loaded with some of the top stars in Tinseltown.

As a movie buff, it's gonna be fun reading this thread. Thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ned, that story is the coolest thing since ice cubes...but not as cool as Lee[!].

 

Glory be...I'm on the verge of "gushing".

 

Keep the stories coming, Ned. It's a pleasure to welcome you here.

 

[exits, to look for a mop to tidy up with...]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Folks, I hate to say it, but I can't really spend a lot of time here simply spinning yarns. This forum is hopefully to be a place for people to discuss movies like on all the other forums, but perhaps here to hone in a bit more on movies that members of my family were in, or things that people might want to know, specifically, about us/me or people I knew. Having me spin yarns is too open-ended. It becomes like a one-man show. I need to be stimulated the same as anyone else would. We all work off each other. Having me simply hold forth at will - OK, I do reserve the right to do that from time to time - makes me feel too much like a megalomaniac: I mean, who wouldn't like a forum like this to just say whatever they want? Perhaps to get material for their one-man show, for instance, or...wait a minute...let's roll that one by again slowly: one...man...show. As Tony Soprano might say, Whoa! Broadway. Big dollars. Fame. As Stevie Winwood sang, Back In the High Life Again (Oh, yes, there is another part of my life: I wrote a song for Frank Sinatra and another for The Mamas And The Papas. So, basically...I rock.

 

OK, time to get back to more about me, me me me me me me me...hmmm... now I'm starting to sound like Daffy Duck. But you can see the problem of letting someone like me loose in the vineyards. Still: another shot? My phone ringing again? Girls. Girls! . Groupies. Do they still exist? Like I remember them, I mean (my old friend Scott McKenzie of "If You're Going To San Francisco, (Better Wear Some Flowers In Your Hair) was so traumatized by the sight of girls tramping in battalions up Laurel Canyon looking for his house so they could jump through the windows and molest him to within an inch of his life, that he virtually went into hibernation and hasn't really come out yet. That's a long time, people)?

 

Single again (after two failed marriages), still handsome as all get-out, famous, rich, beloved of the nation for my acerb and hilarious commentaries on Paris Hilton and Lindsay Lohan and the whole diva thing; a celebrated, drole return of serve at cocktail parties, a dry, snippy, practically gay wit combined uniquely with an unexpectedly warm fireside manner and an easy-going good-naturedness which people find practically irresistible but manage nonetheless to resist, Letterman, Leno, guest spot on Nip/Tuck or maybe Rescue Me. Jeez. Why didn't I think of this BEFORE?

 

All right. That's a taste. I do go on rants, I do react to stimulating conversation. I am an opinionated snob (I was raised to be one, believe me), but I try to be entertaining and tasteful wherever possible unless I can find a way around it. My sarcastic and self-deprecating (it is self-deprecating, really) humor might not captivate everyone (as you might well imagine), and I am bound to draw some here who have a gripe or an axe to grind of one kind or another. Better see what that's about before I take my show out on the road and some jack*ff tries to kill me. Can I say "jack*ff" on TCM (I can hear my dad and Lee shouting "****!" from the golden sound stage in the sky).

 

So there it is. At present I am working on an article for a weekly newsmagazine in Sydney so I need to be on my computer a lot as the deadline is approaching. But I'm like most writers, we will try and sneak off from time to time. So think about what might be areas people want to know about, and perhaps pose a question or two and let's see what happens. I'm totally game for this.

 

Ned

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ned, I would be interested to hear about what some of your favorite classic films are, since you may be thinking of them from a somewhat different perspective than do the rest of us. You may like some because you knew about them as they were being made, or because someone you personally knew was involved or, maybe, just because you like them.

 

How do you view those movies your relatives were in? Can you separate the actor from the person when you see them? Do you look at them at all, or have you had enough? What sort of family lore were you subjected to - reverent, humorous, indifferent . . . ? What place were you given in this hierarchy? How do you see yourself now (your previous postings here reveal a gentle sense of humor about that - was it hard won?)

 

Well, that should give you an idea of what at least one woman on this board would like to know, and should be good for a few postings from you and some Q&A and commentary from the rest of us. Actually, I think I've read your book, but since I have trouble these days remembering what happened more than 5 minutes ago, it may take me a while to bring it back.

 

I look forward to more.

Regards,

Judith

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Ned, nice to have you on the boards. I've heard of your book, sounds like an interesting read. Behind-the-scenes Hollywood tales can be very enlightening, and good for a laugh sometimes too.

 

As Mongo mentioned, how is your mother doing? I remember seeing her in a documentary not to long ago. I believe it was the one on Errol Flynn. And do you keep in touch with your stepfather Van? Last I read, he's living in a home in Nyack, New York. How is he these days?

 

Would love to hear some of your childhood impressions of your father's and stepfather's contemporaries. I'm sure you went to many parties and other social events while growing up, and I'd love to hear of any encounters you had with some of the greats of that era, such as Tracy and Hepburn, and Lucille Ball, who, as I'm sure you know, all worked with your father in "Without Love." And what did your father think of Peter Sellers and Sterling Hayden having worked with them in "Dr. Strangelove?" Did you know them at all?

 

I could ask questions all day, but I'll leave it at that for now. And thanks for taking the time to share.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scott Mckenzie ,that's wild I loved that song a beautiful and melodic voice he had.I saw him in Winnipeg years ago. Does he still sing? you mention him being in hibernation Thanks Inglis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jdb,

Some of my favorite classic films are The Treasure Of The Sierra Madre for its brilliant screenplay which presents us with a complete moral tale which doesn?t preach to us, just lets us watch what the results of our own actions may bring us; the acting which is universally terrific. Bogie is superb, Walter Huston magical, even Tim Holt ? often a kind of cipher in films ? shows remarkable skill and sensitivity here. Alphonso Bedoya, in one of cinema?s defining moments, utters one of the most famous lines in movie history and makes one of the best and most grightening bad guys I had ever seen up to that time. Barton Maclane and Bruce Bennet look and feel right in this stellar cast. They are not out of their depth. Bennet turned 100 in May, by the way. John Huston shows the world a sound and vigorous hand could do with a rugged tale of lust and greed and cravenness and nobility could be like when that hand was when, beside the strength and rigor was also capable of bringing a truly artistic vision to the screen. What a terrific film.

 

In no particular order:

 

It Happened One Night. Bambi. The African Queen (written by a man I think was close to genius and practically defined the art of film criticism for all time). Sorry, Wrong Number (scared the crap out of me. We even had the record which was made, a radio play, which was equally scary). The Killers (original). The Third Man. Hud. One-Eyed Jacks. Rashomon. And God Created Woman (only because of Bardot naked, Roger Vadim was a lousy director). The Seven Samurai. The 400 Blows. Amarcord. The Bank Dick (or any one of a dozen Fields movies, especially the collection entitled Six Short Films which are sesational). Laurel and Hardy during their great days in the 1930?s. None of their stuff after 1939). Johnny Guitar. The Virgin Spring. I Vitelloni. Kind Hearts And Coronets. The Man In The White Suit. Tunes Of Glory. Nights Of Cabiria. Pickup On South Street. The Asphalt Jungle. The End Of The Affair. A Raisin In The Sun. Picnic At Hanging Rock. The Odd Couple. And Then There Were None (original ? great suspense). Hobson?s Choice. Some Like It Hot. Abbott And Costello Meet Frankenstein. Battleground. Brigadoon. Life Begins For Andy Hardy. The Big Country. Men Of The Fighting Lady (because Dad and Van were both in it, not because it?s a great film, it?s very good, not great). The Apartment. Bell, Book, And Candle. The Man With The Golden Arm. Straw Dogs. Unfaithfully Yours. The Fortune Cookie. Jungle Book (with Sabu, 1942). The Thief Of Baghdad (Sabu?s other wonderful fantasy film). Singin? In The Rain. Guys And Dolls. Captains Courageous. The Long Goodbye. Arthur. Great Expectations (1946). A Christmas Carol (Alastair Sim version). Heaven Can Wait (both). The Killing. Spartacus. Diabolique (1954). Charlie Chan At The Opera (Charlie Chan is one of the most underrated detectives in film history). Ruggles Of Red Gap. The Awful Truth. Days Of Wine And Roses. The Maltese Falcon. The Big Sleep. The Hunchback Of Notre Dame. Goodbye, Mr. Chips. Topper. The Philadelphia Story (one of the smartest, funniest, best movies ever). Woman Of The Year. Adam?s Rib. Little Women (Hepburn?s). Meet Me In St. Louis. Dark Victory. The Miracle Of Morgan Creek and Hail The Conquering Hero (the only Eddie Bracken movies on my list because of Sturges, a great talent). Down Argentine Way (along with Roz Russell, Grable was one of mom?s best pals). The Postman Always Rings Twice. Double Indemnity. I Wake Up Screaming (little-known Grable ?not-noir? thriller by the director of the Charlie Chan movies. And because one of my childhood idols and my dad?s pal until he died before his time, Laird Cregar who deserves his own forum just for The Lodger. In fact?) The Lodger.

 

Look, I could go on here. It?s nuts. There are so many movies. I forgot Bad Day At Black Rock, Stalag 17, a couple of Mickey Rooney?s B films, The Big Wheel and Fireball, both extremely dated but, taken with Quicksand, form what I like to think of as a Mickey Rooney trilogy. These pictures were made during Rooney?s difficult transition from Andy Hardy to grown up roles which served as a means for Mickey to stay in movies (and get him to Bridges of Toko Ri). He is a real ?stayer? lasting through every kind of cycle Hollywood could throw at him. During this era he made a bunch of these B films and many of them just suck horribly, but some are entertaining as all get-out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Inglis: Scott does still sing, but he is still a very private guy. He goes to Germany from time to time and does concerts. I think that the generation of Germans who remember him singing about going to San Francisco are very attached to that song because most of them were East Germans back then (anyone remember the year?), and they were longing for freedom. The song said "freedom" to them. So he has a big fan base there. They are older now, of course, but still very affectionate towards Scott. It's about as much exposure as Scott cares to have these days.

 

Moviejoe, mongo, Judith, et al: My mom, Evie, died in June of 2004 having just turned 90. She was, indeed, a major Hollywood hostess and personality. Everyone knew her, and most of them loved her (including all my buddies who thought she was the most generous person in the world, which she probably was). She thoroughly inhabited her greatest moment which lasted about fifteen years through the late 40?s and most of the 1950?s when she had many of the biggest names in entertainment sitting in our living room in the house in Beverly Hills on Foothill Road.

 

I do not keep in contact with Van, in fact I have not seen him in over 30 years. The story about him and our family is long and occupies a great deal of my book. It is too long to even start going into here, however, briefly outlined it might sound something like this:

 

Man marries best friend?s wife. Proceeds to take best friend?s wife and two sons away from best friend.

Man and best friend?s ex-wife produce daughter.

Family moves from Santa Monica (pure heaven for 7 year old boy, Santa Monica) to Beverly Hills (7 year old boy devastated, but eventually grows to enjoy BH because city has alleys behind all houses which makes boy feel tough and world-weary for some incomprehensible reason.

Family lives in Beverly Hills and kids grow up in Beverly Hills public school system.

Man?s career soars into mid-1950?s when, inexplicably, it begins to sputter and die.

Man takes family to London during his run doing Music Man on West End stage.

Family stays together until 1962 when Man deserts family to be with lover who happens to be Man?s dresser from Music Man. For some who miss the meaning of this: Man is gay.

Gay Man and best friend?s ex-wife divorce. Acrimoniously.

Gay Man and boyfriend live together in New York.

Man sees daughter a few times before abandoning her altogether.

7 year old boy now about 18 or so does not take kindly to Man?s abandonment of his sister. Nothing is her fault, after all.

Man visits daughter one day when 19 year old boy is also there. Man pretends not to recognize stepson whom he has known since the boy was a baby. Boy now pretty sick of Man whom he once loved unconditionally; seems a condition eventually cropped up.

When Man lives permanently in NYC, daughter and boy no longer see him.

Over time boy comes to understand the Man?s problem, but cannot forgive him for his betrayal of his own, blameless child.

 

That covers it. I have not seen Van since probably sometime in early 1970?s. My mother was never able to completely get over it. I don?t know what it was in her personality that made her remain bitter and angry for more than 40 years, but there it is. As to my sister, Schuyler, she was deeply traumatized by the event and never completely recovered though I think she did well despite this. She did go to see him once when he was in Florida. She had read he was going down there to participate in an MGM reunion of some kind (this was maybe 6 or 7 years back? Anyone know more about this?). She went to his hotel and found out his room number.

 

She went up to the room and knocked on the door. When the door opened she was confronted with a tall, fat, ridiculously made-up man (remember, Van was appearing on TV, not on the stage ? he had on stage makeup which is really bizarre when seen up close). He said, suspiciously, he was always suspicious after working a few years in the business, who are you? She said, I?m your daughter, Schuyler. This apparently did not please him, but there was no other way for Sky to get to him. When she called he refused to take the call, never called back, all that stuff. So he wasn't happy about her sudden appearance and kind of looked around as if there might be a way out. He said, Hello. She said, Hi. (no embrace, folks, no wow, I have been wondering what became of you, etc., no invitation to come into the room ? this entire 90 second interview took place in the hotel corridor).

Van said, how is your mother? Fine, said Sky. Well, Van said, I have to get going I?m due downstairs... and shut the door.

 

That was it. Hadn?t seen his only child in 40 years and didn?t even invite her into his room, didn?t give her a hug, nothing. Treated her like the stranger she had become. Keep in mind that this girl never, ever in the time he did live with her (until she was about 14) say a nasty word to him, never disrespected him, never did anything, really, to deserve this treatment. This was all Van?s character and personality. Not the guy I remembered from the halcyon days of the 1950?s, either. He was a generous, humorous, fun to be around?most of the time. But this personality was evidently there all the time.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a question along the lines of the May Wynn thing: whatever happened to Judi West, the girl in Fortune Cookie?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And another thing about The Fortune Cookie: I was interested to see certain things in this 1966 movie which I thought were invented later, namely colored contact lenses, were already available. And Jack Lemmon's electric wheelchair reminded me that those were not new even then. Movies can remind us of small things like that sometimes even more than the Big Issues, and sometimes these little details make me think much more than the stuff we see as more important. It's details in film that pinpoint our personal place at certain stages of history (because history is going on all the time), and for some reason I sometimes get a funny feeling watching movies made during my own lifetime.Sometimes they depress me, even comedies. I suppose it's the mood I'm in when I watch them, but I am not always transported away from myself by these movies but they send me plummeting headlong into my own fears and anxieties. Partly this can be attributed to my own proximity to the film industry, but sometimes I think it's the same existential angst that everyone is once in a while gripped by. A kind of terror that life is moving much too fast and that I have missed something, something I would love to get back but cannot.

 

Just trying to cheer you all up.

 

Ned

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ekw,

 

Is Tracy Keenan Wynn your brother? I remember his name from a number of memorable movie of the weeks that he wrote back in the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello and welcome, Ned. I did read your book, not in hardback as you posted about earlier, so I did miss the pictures. I experienced a lot of emotions reading your stories, happiness, anger, sadness - it was harrowing. I would pick it up and read a few chapters, then put it away vowing to never touch it again. That's not a criticism, but a compliment. Your writing touched me, your life touched me. The story of your Grandfather, your Father and Mother, such loving people, trying to do their best, be the best and all under the Hollywood microscope. Do you think their foibles were magnified and/or caused by the Hollywood-ness of it all? I heard a radio interview with your sister some years back, she was speaking about writing a book, but I haven't heard any more about it. She did relate the story of meeting with her father at the hotel. She seemed so fragile and heartbroken. How is she doing now?

I promise to ask more pertinent "movie" questions in the future. Thanks for coming to the TCM forum.

-Susan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, like everyone else, I thoroughly enjoy your stories. I hope you have a lot of free time as it seems you're going to be bombarded here. I'm definitely going to keep my eyes open for your book. I had no idea about Van Johnson's track record. I just watched him yesterday in a (probably) very rarely seen made-for-television musical from 1958 titled "The Pied Piper of Hamelin". It had too much singing if you ask me, but how can you go wrong witih Claude Rains and Jim Backus hamming it up together.

 

I just checked out your credits on imdb and an episode of "Combat" caught my eye. I would be curious to hear any anecdotes that you have to share from filming the episode you were in (I just watched that episode three weeks ago!). Were Vic Morrow and Rick Jason tough guys in real life. It's tragic how they both died. I read somewhere on a "Combat" website that episodes of that show were played for troops over in Vietnam because they thought that Vic was a bigger bad@$$ than John Wayne. And, I realize you probably weren't around those guys for more than a couple of days since you only appeared in one episode, but I'd still be interested in what you have to say.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, Ned, your memories are so poignant and interesting, and I do hope you have reached a stage in your life where you can realize that ill-advised parental behavior is not necessarily a product of a movie career, but more likely of a flaw in character which very well may have been, as you say, always there. I had an experience similar to Schulyer's with my own father, and blamed myself for years until I thought about it carefully, and came to the conclusion that the man was unbalanced, through no fault of mine.

 

Your comment about classic movies as history is very well taken. I think it's one of the reasons most of us like to watch them, and it is certainly a measure of their value above and beyond that of entertainment. The same is true for popular music, and accounts for the enduring popularity of "oldies." These elements are like the soundtracks of our lives, and give us those Proustian moments that can take us back in an instant and reassure us as to how far we have progressed. (Proustian? Am I getting carried away here? Sorry.)

 

Anyway . . . your listing of favorite movies definitely makes you one of us. And your citing of Laurel & Hardy AND Sabu --- well, I think I'm in love!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read that Vic Morrow was one of the nicest men in Hollywood - the complete opposite of some of the roles he played. Most guest stars wanted to be in "Combat" to have the opportunity to work with Vic. He was always friendly and never tried to upstage anyone. This is what I read about him. I think he's one of the best actors, very underated and I do hope that someday TCM will honor this fine actor with a special day to showcase his films.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that the young Sabu was beautiful to the point of sublimity. I am a straight male, but that kid was gorgeous. He was so appealing to me when I was a boy that I wanted to be in the movies with him and go on all his adentures. I think I kind of hero worshipped him. His career and life were rather short if I recall, but those two film really have stayed with me all these years.

 

And L&H were also sublime. Their finest years (the Flying Deuces, Way Out West, Saps At Sea, etc.) attached me to them forever. When I was a kid their movies were the ones - along with Charlie Chase (try finding his films today, anyone seen any?) Hopalong Cassidy and Roy Rogers, etc. - which fed the late night rerun hours. So I watched and watched them. I believe it's fair to include them in a Best Movies list, and, if scholarly review declines to grant them that inclusion, certainly in a Favorite Movies list.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hopalong Cassidy:

 

One of our cable stations runs a Saturday afternoon "Hopalong Cassidy Theater." It's a riot - it's done just like a local, low-budget TV station of the 50s would have done it. The host is a rather unprepossessing middle-aged man in a cowboy hat, who explains what we're about to see, and points out the names of the character actors who will be in the episode. Last week it was Percy somebody (I've forgotten - but the one who did the voice of the White Rabbit in Disney's "Alice in Wonderland.") Helton? It's very enjoyable to watch Hoppy the old way. We forget that in the past there was so much live television.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vic Morrow was indeed a very sweet guy. I knew Bob Altman, and he always made sure I worked on Combat! as often as possible (Bob Blees and Bob Altman produced the show, and Altman did work, uncredited, on a few shows. I also knew Lazlo Benedek and Ted Post, and they put my name in the cast list from time to time). I was merely hired as atmosphere though I think I once was thrown a line. Vic was an uncompromising professional, and as importantly to a kid who was hanging around, not a dick. He was nice to me which might have been a product of who my dad was, I don't know. But he was pretty cool with everyone, so I think it was who he was inside.

 

Another actor comes to mind, tragically overlooked in my opinion, Nick Adams, "The Rebel." I never met him, but me and my mates always watched The Rebel each week before going out for beers. He did a lot of work in Japan, and he did a ton of stuff like Tales of Wells Fargo and Zane Grey Theater. But he never got the recognition he deserved. When he was found dead (was it in Japan does anyone know?), we immediately thought he had been murdered by Yakuza for gambling debts or something, such was the nature of our hyper-romantic movie-dizzied minds at the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...