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Just to Pep Things Up Here a Little Bit


CaveGirl
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Name your favorite film with the theme of ****!

 

I'm sure this topic will bring the males here out in droves.

 

I know nothing about this subject, other than what I learned watching Suzanne Pleshette as one in the film, "A Rage to Live".

 

I've heard in real life this ailment is not all that much fun, at least for the victim, but you would not know it from watching movies.

 

Next?

 

Update: Uh, think of water "nymphs" and then add the word "mania" with an "o" before it. Sorry I got bleeped. I mean it is a legitimate medical term so who knew! OH, yeah be sure to drop the plural "s" from "nymphs" too or it will sound like dipsomania.

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Name your favorite film with the theme of ****!

 

I'm sure this topic will bring the males here out in droves.

 

I know nothing about this subject, other than what I learned watching Suzanne Pleshette as one in the film, "A Rage to Live".

 

I've heard in real life this ailment is not all that much fun, at least for the victim, but you would not know it from watching movies.

 

Next?

 

Update: Uh, think of water "nymphs" and then add the word "mania" with an "o" before it. Sorry I got bleeped. I mean it is a legitimate medical term so who knew! OH, yeah be sure to drop the plural "s" from "nymphs" too or it will sound like dipsomania.

The segment that starred Claire Bloom in George Cukor's "The Chapman Report".

 

That performance should have made her a star.

 

But I don't think that Claire Bloom was interested in Hollywood stardom.

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Hi, CaveGirl.

 

I  have to laugh at your first sentence. I read your first post in this thread before you added the explanation of what was bleeped.  I thought that this was a request for movies where words in the title get bleeped in the TCM forums.

 

 

Yes, it is a medical term. That does not mean that it won't get bleeped in this forum.

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Rhonda Fleming had a bit part in Spellbound in which her character was one. There's a "Word of Mouth" piece that shows when TCM has Spellbound on the schedule in which she says that when she was auditioning for the part, she didn't know what it was, so she and her very conservative mother (with whom she was living at the time) looked it up in the dictionary. ;)

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One film I saw recently on TCM that may qualify for this topic is Spike Lee's She's Gotta Have It (if you are not looking for an exact match with a clinical definition).

 

I was also reading on the message boards that the Diane Keaton film Looking for Mr. Goodbar is scheduled on TCM in July.  Haven't seen it yet but it may qualify as well.

 

Surprised the message board auto-censors that term, since it would seem that just mentioning it shouldn't offend anyone.

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I seem to recall a character with the condition, to the point of deranged mania, in one of Fellini's films, maybe Amarcord? She lived in a shack on the beach or something. It's been a while.

Lawrence, it was "8 1/2".

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I seem to recall a character with the condition, to the point of deranged mania, in one of Fellini's films, maybe Amarcord? She lived in a shack on the beach or something. It's been a while.

I haven't seen Amarcord in a long time, but I don't remember such a character. I remember Gradisca, the town flirt.

In 8 1/2  Saraghina lives in a shack on the beach and dances seductively for a few coins.

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Brigitte Bardot's last film with Roger Vadim, "Ms. Don Juan" - she was so good at sex, so desperate for sex, that she traveled in a submarine for quick get-aways.

 

High camp, and not to be believed.

 

And I loved every minute of it.

 

Her most memorable "lay" - Robert Walker, Jr. - who woke up the next morning and realized that she had departed and, so, he decided to kill himself.

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Here's a movie I've seen once when it was only available on tape.  It is now easily found on DVD. 

 

     2069:  A Sex Odyssey (1974-West German)  Dubbed into English / Color / 81 minutes

 

     Here is the write-up on the 1983 Imperial Video Corp. box front:

 

"A SPACED OUT COMEDY WITH THE MOST EXCITING CLIMAXES . . . !" 

 

     I don't know if this movie was submitted to the MPAA; the box art says 'R Category' on it.  There's no actual rating. 

 

     *The plot description on the back of the box art says this:

 

"A team of beautiful, sensuous astronauts are sent to the planet Earth to obtain male sp•rm which they must bring back to Venus since their population, consisting of females only, is in danger of becoming extinct without it.

 

     The women capture unwary male subjects and soon discover the excitement of earth-style love-making.  Will this science-friction work?  . . . Or will it be emmission (sic)-impossible?  Find all the answers as you view the funniest sci-fi sex comedy ever!"

 

      NOW I ask you:  Does this not sound like an educational movie?  :)

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Rhonda Fleming had a bit part in Spellbound in which her character was one. There's a "Word of Mouth" piece that shows when TCM has Spellbound on the schedule in which she says that when she was auditioning for the part, she didn't know what it was, so she and her very conservative mother (with whom she was living at the time) looked it up in the dictionary. ;)

Rhonda was quite "striking" in that role.

 

 

But my favorite nymphomaniac in the movies is the actress who won the Oscar for being a nymphomaniac. Rock Hudson told her you're sick and you need a doctor.

 

I'm speaking of the beautiful Dorothy Malone who cha-chaed her father to death in Written on the Wind.

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Does Elizabeth Taylor's first Oscar-winning character -- Gloria Wandrous -- count? After all, she had the unforgettable line in "BUtterfield 8" (1960): "Mama, face it: I was the **** of all time."

 

6853_7.jpg

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I seem to recall a character with the condition, to the point of deranged mania, in one of Fellini's films, maybe Amarcord? She lived in a shack on the beach or something. It's been a while.

Lawrence, respectfully, you've conflated two Fellini films.

It was not 8 1/2,  you are right, it's Amarcord. It's a character called "Volpina", played by Josiane Tanzilli. She's the town --- here I have a problem with what word to use. The usual word is the "town s l u t", a word I regard as intensely derogatory and offensive. Anyway, Volpina clearly really wants it; she's always sidling around work sites where men are, licking her lips and laughing quietly to herself.  I don't think she has a single word of dialogue in the film. I believe we're supposed to think she's not only the town s **t, but the village idiot. (Which has all kinds of awful implications, if you think about it. But she's presented in a fairly sympathetic and light-hearted way.)

 

Coincidentally, I just received a fabulous copy of Amarcord, a Criterion edition, as a Mother's Day gift (even though it was not from any of my children, it was from my husband. But I digress.) I was delighted, Amarcord is one of my favourite movies of all time.

 

The character people are thinking of in 8 1/2 is "Saraghina". She was the local prostitute in Gweedo's village when he was a boy, and she's the one who "lived in a shack on the beach". He has a recurring childhood / adolescent memory of Saraghina dancing on the beach. It's a great scene.

But a "prostitute" is not the same thing as a "n imphomanyac".  Although of course, it always helps if you enjoy your work.

 

ps: I know how to spell the name of the male character in 8 1/2,but the ridiculous autocensor bleeps it out, so I deliberately misspelled it.

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Some might claim PIPER LAURIE's character in THE HUSTLER fits this bill, but it seems "n y m p h o s" as central characters would probably be more prevalent in foriegn cinema, America "back then" being so uptight about it all. 

 

In more modern American films, I'd be hard pressed (no pun intended!) to point any out(with anything ) in any certainty    :)

 

Sepiatone

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I'm surprised no one has as yet mentioned one of the most famous (I've always thought) "nimphos" of all moviedom, Carmen Sternwood, delightfully and deliciously played by Martha Vickers.

 

How 'bout that scene where she sways up to Bogart and "tried to sit on his lap while he was standing up"? 

I suspect it's made even more clear in the novel, but in the film, at the very end, Marlowe tells Vivian Sternwood that they should send Carmen away somewhere to be "cured". He says something like "she's sick, they have treatments for that kind of thing..."

 

Poor Carmen !

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Of course, we do all know that there's actually no such thing as "nimfomania", right?  A woman who likes sex a lot and is not too discriminating where it comes from is "ill" ?

 

Notice there's no corresponding word for men who enjoy and pursue sex a lot. In a woman, it's pursuing this activity "to excess"; there doesn't appear to be any measure of "to excess" in men. There's certainly no word like "n****c" that applies to men.

 

Every character who's been mentioned here - always a woman - is either someone who has sex with men to earn her living, a  p r o s t i t u t e ,  or simply a woman who really enjoys sex and is not too choosy about who she has it with. Why  is this considered an illness?

 

edit: I just looked it up. According to a definition I found on the internet,  the condition is found in "a woman who has uncontrollable and excessive sexual desire."  Hmm.

 

edit2: wait !  I just looked this up, too:  I was wrong. There is a word for the parallel condition in men, it's called "satyriasis". But you don't hear that one batted about the way you do the other word, the one that applies to women.

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Does Elizabeth Taylor's first Oscar-winning character -- Gloria Wandrous -- count? After all, she had the unforgettable line in "BUtterfield 8" (1960): "Mama, face it: I was the **** of all time."

 

6853_7.jpg

Jak--

 

 

Liz Taylor's Oscar for Butterfield 8 is one of these deals - -

 

She deserved an Oscar for Suddenly Last Summer because she did all that great screaming -- but we couldn't give her the Oscar then because she was having an adulterous Affair /adulteress marriage with Eddie Fisher and made that sweet "Tammy" Debbie Reynolds unhappy.

 

But we can give it to her now because she almost died of double pneumonia and had to have a tracheotomy, which scarred that beautiful throat.

 

So we think she's been punished enough now, so that she deserves the award that she should have gotten in the first place for Suddenly Last Summer.

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Rhonda was quite "striking" in that role.

 

 

But my favorite nymphomaniac in the movies is the actress who won the Oscar for being a nymphomaniac. Rock Hudson told her you're sick and you need a doctor.

 

I'm speaking of the beautiful Dorothy Malone who cha-chaed her father to death in Written on the Wind.

Yes, Dorothy Malone was quite the nymphomaniac in "Written On The Wind".

 

I loved her dysfunctional relationship with her brother.

 

Long live Kyle Hadley and Marylee Hadley!

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Lawrence, respectfully, you've conflated two Fellini films.

It was not 8 1/2,  you are right, it's Amarcord. It's a character called "Volpina", played by Josiane Tanzilli. She's the town --- here I have a problem with what word to use. The usual word is the "town s l u t", a word I regard as intensely derogatory and offensive. Anyway, Volpina clearly really wants it; she's always sidling around work sites where men are, licking her lips and laughing quietly to herself.  I don't think she has a single word of dialogue in the film. I believe we're supposed to think she's not only the town s **t, but the village idiot. (Which has all kinds of awful implications, if you think about it. But she's presented in a fairly sympathetic and light-hearted way.)

 

Coincidentally, I just received a fabulous copy of Amarcord, a Criterion edition, as a Mother's Day gift (even though it was not from any of my children, it was from my husband. But I digress.) I was delighted, Amarcord is one of my favourite movies of all time.

 

The character people are thinking of in 8 1/2 is "Saraghina". She was the local prostitute in Gweedo's village when he was a boy, and she's the one who "lived in a shack on the beach". He has a recurring childhood / adolescent memory of Saraghina dancing on the beach. It's a great scene.

But a "prostitute" is not the same thing as a "n imphomanyac".  Although of course, it always helps if you enjoy your work.

 

ps: I know how to spell the name of the male character in 8 1/2,but the ridiculous autocensor bleeps it out, so I deliberately misspelled it.

"Amacord" was such an unforgettable Fellini entertainment.

 

I miss the man and his films so much.

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Of course, we do all know that there's actually no such thing as "nimfomania", right?  A woman who likes sex a lot and is not too discriminating where it comes from is "ill" ?

 

Notice there's no corresponding word for men who enjoy and pursue sex a lot. In a woman, it's pursuing this activity "to excess"; there doesn't appear to be any measure of "to excess" in men. There's certainly no word like "n****c" that applies to men.

 

Every character who's been mentioned here - always a woman - is either someone who has sex with men to earn her living, a  p r o s t i t u t e ,  or simply a woman who really enjoys sex and is not too choosy about who she has it with. Why  is this considered an illness?

 

edit: I just looked it up. According to a definition I found on the internet,  the condition is found in "a woman who has uncontrollable and excessive sexual desire."  Hmm.

 

edit2: wait !  I just looked this up, too:  I was wrong. There is a word for the parallel condition in men, it's called "satyriasis". But you don't hear that one batted about the way you do the other word, the one that applies to women.

Yes, it is "satyriasis", and Helmut Berger had a bad case of it in Massimo Dallamano's flick, "The Secret Of Dorian Gray".

 

maxresdefault.jpg

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