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The Thelma Todd and Zasu Pitts shorts I've been enjoying immensely. Their pretty good for 20 minutes. One of their shorts are going to be shown and it is Strictly Unreliable, that's tape worthy.

 

Also, Streamlined Swing, Hollywood Handicap, Ladies Last, Billy Rose Casa Manana Revue, Hollywood Hobbies are tape worthy

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They all look good to me, up until about 8:00pm that is. That's when I will be finalizing and labeling my recordings. The thing to think about is that the chance of ever seeing these early shorts a second time is almost nil. I would bet that the Hermes sponsored shorts will probably be shown more than once. You just can't keep a film like "Bad-**** Grandkids" down. That Scorcese short "The Big Shave" or whatever, looks like a must miss though. Just the thought of it gives me the willies.

 

Signed,

 

A Foetus (even younger than the infant)

 

Message was edited by:

NortBanba

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If anyone has taped the 21 minute 1938 short of "Billy Rose's Casa Manana Revue" I'd love to buy a copy. My parents were dancers in it and actually met at the Casa Manana Club. I couldn't believe my eyes when I flipped channels and saw it playing. I didn't know that there was ever a filming of any of those elaborate performances. Too bad my VCR wasn't hooked up! I don't think that the short is available anywhere at this time.

Thanks, Gwen

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Is "Billy Rose's Casa..." the short that contains the vibrant Technicolor footage of Cary Grant and Randolph Scott (seated together) and other stars (Errol Flynn and Damita possibly) observing the young Judy Garland with her two older sisters singing "La Cucaracha"?

 

This short is glimpsed in "That's Entertainment!" (1974) in the portion of that documentary that Liza Minnelli introduces on Mama. I always wondered what that short was and where it can be viewed...?

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Mr. Lydecker,

 

The short that you're thinking of is 1935's La Fiesta de Santa Barbara. It's available as supplemental material on the For Me and My Gal DVD. It's an all-star, all-color feature with Andy Devine, Ted Healey [does Norm MacDonald consciously try to emulate him?], Chester Conklin, and some surprising chorus girls (like Shirley Ross and a blonde Ida Lupino!). Narrated by Pete Smith, keep an eye out for cameos by [a red headed!] Binnie Barnes, Gilbert Roland, Buster Keaton, Robert Taylor, and Gary Cooper. The Garland Sisters (as they're billed here) are swell of course, but there's some deadly comedy and a lot of corn. Enjoy!

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I think I have a recording of it. I have to look at the DVR stuff I recorded while I was at work. I might be able to burn a copy of it. I don't know how big it will be. I'm happy to help you out (if I don't get banned for my last post in the, 'baloney' thread). Hehe.

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Dolores,

 

I hope you recorded Buster Keaton's "The Scarecrow" from 1920. This short film is an EXCELLENT example of Keaton's inventive comedy. My opinion...no one has done physical comedy better than Buster Keaton, Charley Chase and Fatty Arbuckle. Thank God some of their work is not in the "lost" category and may be enjoyed today.

 

 

Rusty

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Thanks, Rusty -- except for one 15 minute period, I think I have the entire 24 hours recorded. Lots of hubbub about the day, so I will think of all this fondly when I finally get around to watching them!!!! :0

 

I love Buster Keaton's physical comedy...so effortless, so perfectly timed and executed.

 

I am ashamed to say I am not that familiar with Charley Chase and I'm also afraid I have a biased eye towards Fatty Arbuckle, based on his past.

 

dolores

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Would someone fill me in on the short film "La Jet?e" (1962). I missed the first five minutes of the film and (naturally) did not set up my recorder. I just read the David English synopsis of "La Jet?e" and it was interesting, but did not go into plot details. Was this experiment done in the present, or the future? A camp is mentioned by the narrator...are they in some sort of prisoner of war camp? Does the narrator explain the WHY of the experiment? Note, I still enjoyed...no, I was mesmerized by my 23 minute view of "La Jet?e".

 

Rusty

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> Would someone fill me in on the short film "La Jet?e" (1962).

> I missed the first five minutes

 

It starts with the narrator explaining that as a child he saw someone murdered at the airport. Many years later, following a nuclear war, he is chosen to participate in time travel experiments, in part because he has vivid memories of the past. The experiments are initiated in what is supposed to be our future, and he travels back to what is supposed to be our present. He meets a woman there and begins to fall in love with her.

 

That should cover the first five minutes or so -- without giving away too much of the plot.

 

DavidE

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DavidEnglish,

 

Thank you very much for the reply to my "La Jet?e" question. I WAS scratching my head over the very last scene of the short film. Your explanation of the first few minutes ties the whole film together. Very good...I hope TCM broadcasts a repeat of that thing in the near future.

 

I have watched about half the "Shorts Circuits" programming (I recorded most of the short films)...my four favorites:

 

"The Scarecrow"...no surprise.

"La Jet?e"...again, no surprise.

Jane Campion's "Passionless Moments"...I now have a real good idea of the dimensions of a tissue box.

"Hollywood Hobbies"(?)...specifically, the "let's watch Clark Gable whitewash his barn" segment.

 

Frankly my dear, I love to paint...

 

Rusty

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It's such a shame that the Todd/Pitts type of comedy hasn't been recreated by other actresses. With some of the physical contortions they get into (suggestive & semi undressing) it's almost Benny Hill meets Laurel & Hardy.Although there have been great female comic performances, no one (except Lucille Ball) has constantly allowed themselves to cop the pratfalls & looked the bumbling clown. These days there always seems to be a feelgood ending.

Also, is anyone able to give some insight as to why actresses are less prone to have slapstick style scenes which require them to endure some sort injury to their buttocks. Most actors seem to have one in their filmography but I can't think of many females.

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