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Despised Movie Professions


LawrenceA
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Something I watched today featured a sleazy fashion photographer as the villain of the piece. It made me think about how often photographers are portrayed as less than savory, either fashion photogs or news cameramen or whatever, in film and television. 

 

What other professions and occupations are often shown in a negative light in films and TV, both classic and modern?

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Journalists:

 

Gene Kelly in "Inherit the Wind" (1960), Barbara Stanwyck in "Meet John Doe" (1941), Burt Lancaster and Tony Curtis in "Sweet Smell of Success" (1957), Kirk Douglas and associates in "Ace in the Hole" (1951), Coral Browne & associates in "The Legend of Lylah Clare (1968)--this is just a handful of performances.

 

 

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serial killers.

 

To answer this question with a more serious answer... usually the local motel proprietor is either creepy (e.g. Norman Bates in Psycho) or just plain crazy (e.g. Dennis Weaver in Touch of Evil). 

 

I can think of a positive fashion photographer in film.  Fred Astaire's fashion photographer in Funny Face was not sleazy.

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serial killers.

 

To answer this question with a more serious answer... usually the local motel proprietor is either creepy (e.g. Norman Bates in Psycho) or just plain crazy (e.g. Dennis Weaver in Touch of Evil). 

 

I can think of a positive fashion photographer in film.  Fred Astaire's fashion photographer in Funny Face was not sleazy.

 

WAIT now, speedy. Aren't you part of the chorus around here that sings that oft-heard refrain about how sleazy it is when a 58 y/o guy chases after a woman who's less than half his age??? ;)

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WAIT now, speedy. Aren't you part of the chorus around here that sings that oft-heard refrain about how sleazy it is when a 58 y/o guy chases after a woman who's less than half his age??? ;)

 

I think I'm in the middle of the two camps.  It depends on who's with who! For some reason, Gary Cooper with Audrey Hepburn was less than desirable in Love in the Afternoon but it didn't seem bad with Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn in Charade

 

Astaire's character in Funny Face isn't sleazy, even though he looks like her dad.  Maybe it's because he's so elegant.  I also think Bogart's character in Sabrina was too old for her, but his character isn't sleazy.  In fact, William Holden's playboy character was a sleaze compared to Bogart's businessman.

 

Don't judge me! I haven't had a day off work since May 8th! I'm at work right now.  I'm delirious! Lol.

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I think I'm in the middle of the two camps.  It depends on who's with who! For some reason, Gary Cooper with Audrey Hepburn was less than desirable in Love in the Afternoon but it didn't seem bad with Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn in Charade

 

Astaire's character in Funny Face isn't sleazy, even though he looks like her dad.  Maybe it's because he's so elegant.  I also think Bogart's character in Sabrina was too old for her, but his character isn't sleazy.  In fact, William Holden's playboy character was a sleaze compared to Bogart's businessman.

 

Don't judge me! I haven't had a day off work since May 8th! I'm at work right now.  I'm delirious! Lol.

It may because I'm 40 years old, so I'm middle aged.

 

For me, it depends upon the actor and actress involved.

 Gable in The Misfits is not sleazy.

 

Bogart going after Bacall is not sleazy.

 

Mick Jagger - sleazy - no matter who the woman is.

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Something I watched today featured a sleazy fashion photographer as the villain of the piece. It made me think about how often photographers are portrayed as less than savory, either fashion photogs or news cameramen or whatever, in film and television. 

 

What other professions and occupations are often shown in a negative light in films and TV, both classic and modern?

Occasionally that very longstanding profession, some call the oldest is looked upon with scorn and derision, Lawrence.

I'll let you guess it, but I will say playing it onscreen often results in receiving many acting accolades!

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How about artists? Whether painters or composers, they are portrayed as moody, irresponsible, off balance kooks.

 

My favorite portrayal of a painter in a movie is Elsa Lanchester in THE BIG CLOCK '48. (I'm nothing like that, right?)

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one of my favorite portrayals of an artist is the artist PAUL NEWMAN plays in WHAT A WAY TO GO.

 

It also seemed to be a statement on the state of artistic endeavor for the times the movie was made.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Landlords/ Superintendents: 

 

  •  Always complaining about noise/coming in too late.
  • There's always something they neglect to fix. Always warning the star about one thing or another. 
  • But, its not all their fault. Stars of films never seem to be able to keep their rent current and sometimes get locked out of their apartments.
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One movie profession that is surprisingly depicted positively are bartenders.  Many films feature the wise bartender to whom the star confides in periodically throughout the film.  The bartender is able to dispense sage advice about whatever dilemma the star is facing.

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When it comes to John Hughes films, assistant principals are never shown in a favorable light. For instance:

 

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Mr. Vernon (Paul Gleason) in "The Breakfast Club" (1985)

 

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Mr. Rooney (Jeffrey Jones) in "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" (1986)

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When it comes to John Hughes films, assistant principals are never shown in a favorable light. For instance:

 

 

Mr. Vernon (Paul Gleason) in "The Breakfast Club" (1985)

 

 

Mr. Rooney (Jeffrey Jones) in "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" (1986)

In this same vein, college Deans are never seen in favorable lights either.

 

Example: Dean Wormer in Animal House

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One movie profession that is surprisingly depicted positively are bartenders.  Many films feature the wise bartender to whom the star confides in periodically throughout the film.  The bartender is able to dispense sage advice about whatever dilemma the star is facing.

Yes, well that is really what they do in real life yes?

 

A friend of mine has a sister who used to be a bartender and she was often dispensing advice. 

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