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Alan Young 1919-2016


Palmerin
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" A horse is a horse of course of course and no one can talk to a horse of course that is of course unless it was the famous actor Mr. Alan Young."

 

Alan tripped the light fantastic talking to his TV horse Mr. Ed for 5 successful seasons.

 

It took a special kind of actor to be that successful when his co-star was a horse who was dubbed by the cowboy B-western actor Allan Rocky Lane.

The beautiful Palomino, Bamboo Harvester would be on the set acting with Alan, while Rocky was just outside the stable window behind a microphone.

 

Alan wrote a wonderful book about his life on the Ed show and his vast Show Business career called Mister Ed and Me and More.

 

Born of Scottish parents in England, Alan's family migrated to Canada and there he got into radio which led to his entry into American radio.

 

Alan was a Pioneer in live American TV & won an early Emmy for the Alan Young show.

 

Among the movies that Alan made, the most popular was The Time Machine which co-starred Rod Taylor.

 

Alan was popular on the nostalgic circuit with his Mr. Ed co-star Connie Hines, who died in 2009.

 

George Burns was the producer of mr. Ed and the show's director, Arthur Lubin,

had first worked with the concept as the director of Francis, the Talking Mule movies.

 

Mr. Ed's cast was rounded out by the next door neighbors - - movie character actors, Larry Keating and Edna Skinner.

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" A horse is a horse of course of course and no one can talk to a horse of course that is of course unless it was the famous actor Mr. Alan Young."

 

Alan tripped the light fantastic talking to his TV horse Mr. Ed for 5 successful seasons.

 

It took a special kind of actor to be that successful when his co-star was a horse who was dubbed by the cowboy B-western actor Allan Rocky Lane.

The beautiful Palomino, Bamboo Harvester would be on the set acting with Alan, while Rocky was just outside the stable window behind a microphone.

 

Alan wrote a wonderful book about his life on the Ed show and his vast Show Business career called Mister Ed and Me.

 

Originally from Scotland, Alan's family migrated to Canada and there he got into radio which led to his entry into American radio.

 

Alan was a Pioneer in live American TV & won an early Emmy for the Alan Young show.

 

Among the movies that Alan made, the most popular was The Time Machine which co-starred Rod Taylor.

 

Alan was popular on the nostalgic circuit with his Mr. Ed co-star Connie Hines, who died in 2009.

 

George Burns was the producer of mr. Ed and the show's director, Arthur Lubin,

had first worked with the concept as the director of Francis, the Talking Mule movies.

 

Mr. Ed's cast was rounded out by the next door neighbors - - movie character actors, Larry Keating and Edna Skinner.

but the one irritating thing about mister ed is for a horse who had so much to say to wilbur, he wouldn't talk to anyone else.

 

talk about a gimmick that was beaten into the ground. how can you watch it with not wishing that just once mister ed would shock the hell outta somebody else like wilbur's wife or addison?

 

all the times that ed got miffed at addison and he never said nuthin'! :lol:

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but the one itrritating thing about mister ed is for a horse who had so much to say to wilbur, he wouldn't talk to anyone else.

 

talk about a gimmick that was beaten into the ground. how can you watch it with not wishing that just once mister ed would shock the hell outta somebody else like wilbur's wife or addison?

 

all the times that ed got miffed at addison and he never said nuthin'! :lol:

Nip--

 

Wilbur was more than a friend to Mr. Ed. He was like a father to Mr. Ed.

 

I can understand your frustration with the plot line, but Wilbur and Mr. Ed decided a long time ago that they would keep it a secret for fear that Ed would be put in a Zoo or museum and made a laughingstock freak exhibit.

 

If you watched the show you know that Mr. Ed had extremely sensitive feelings.

 

I can recall a number of times that Ed used the telephone to talk with Addison and other people to get back at Addison and to get what he wanted-- usually to get Wilbur out of the mess that he'd already gotten Wilbur into.

 

Before they had the internet and online shopping, Mr Ed would get on the phone and order whatever he wanted.

 

In one of my favorite episodes, Ed had a cold and needed to get some sleep. Wilbur kept telling him that he needed to go to bed and sleep it off. So Mr. Ed got on the phone and ordered a Horse- Sized Bed.

 

I don't have to tell you that Connie Hines--who played Carol, Wilbur's wife-- got really mad at Ed. Almost as mad as she got when Ed ate her prized tomatoes. Of course, it was really Wilbur that she was mad at. The way it often played out, it looked as though she was jealous of the relationship between her husband and the horse and felt left out.

 

The Cowboy Wranglers who trained Mister Ed said that they never had trained a horse that intelligent before and they put Ed in another category all together from horse. That was Bamboo Harvester, stage name Mr. Ed.

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Nip--

 

Wilbur was more than a friend to Mr. Ed. He was like a father to Mr. Ed.

 

I can understand your frustration with the plot line, but Wilbur and Mr. Ed decided a long time ago that they would keep it a secret for fear that Ed would be put in a Zoo or museum and made a laughingstock freak exhibit.

 

If you watched the show you know that Mr. Ed had extremely sensitive feelings.

 

I can recall a number of times that Ed used the telephone to talk with Addison and other people to get back at Addison and to get what he wanted-- usually to get Wilbur out of the mess that he'd already gotten Wilbur into.

 

Before they had the internet and online shopping, Mr Ed would get on the phone and order whatever he wanted.

 

In one of my favorite episodes, Ed had a cold and needed to get some sleep. Wilbur kept telling him that he needed to go to bed and sleep it off. So Mr. Ed got on the phone and ordered a Horse- Sized Bed.

 

I don't have to tell you that Connie Hines--who played Carol, Wilbur's wife-- got really mad at Ed. Almost as mad as she got when Ed ate her prized tomatoes. Of course, it was really Wilbur that she was mad at. The way it often played out, it looked as though she was jealous of the relationship between her husband and the horse and felt left out.

 

The Cowboy Wranglers who trained Mister Ed said that they never had trained a horse that intelligent before and they put Ed in another category all together from horse. That was Bamboo Harvester, stage name Mr. Ed.

yeah, I had read that bamboo harvester would open doors and such and was highly intelligent for a horse.

 

one of his parents was an arabian.

 

what killed him was people feeding him peanut butter sandwiches and a whole lotta candy. hell, at least he ate good. :)

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ed pulls a prank on clint eastwood. :lol:

 

Nip--

 

Thanks for the clip with Clint Eastwood.

 

Ed co-starred with all the biggies - - Zsa Zsa Gabor, Mae West, George Burns, Sandy Koufax and Donna Douglas.

 

Raymond Bailey, Richard Deacon, and Eleanor Audley were often seen as well.

 

After Larry Keating died, Leon Ames took his place.

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     I heartily agree with Princess Of Tap that it takes a special type of actor to be able to inter-play so well with an animal. Alan Young made it so realistic that you actually believed he was talking with Mr. Ed. They had an exceptionally close relationship.

     I'd be curious to know what he thought when he was approached for the role of Wilbur and what type of rehearsals were done to make their relationship so real.

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RIP Alan Young.  It was somewhat comforting knowing that he was still alive.  It is very sad that he has passed.  It seems like most of my favorite Nick at Nite stars are gone now.

 

I love Mister Ed.  The relationship between Wilbur and Mr. Ed was very sweet and hilarious.  Much of the time, Mr. Ed's hijinks would end up making Wilbur look insane, much like how Jeannie made Major Nelson look bonkers in I Dream of Jeannie.  In the episode that Princess referred to, Mr. Ed has a cold and Wilbur is spending a lot of time in the barn.  His wife, Carol, is upset because Wilbur's time is monopolized by Ed.  She accuses Wilbur of spending too much money and time on Ed and even alludes to him caring more about Ed than he did about her.  Later, she's all dressed up because Wilbur promised to take her out to dinner.  He ends up going out to purchase some special feed (or something for Ed) and is detained.  This is the last straw for Carol and she threatens to leave Wilbur.  Later, Wilbur brings Carol and the Addisons into the barn to prove to them that he's not doting on Ed.  They walk in only to see Mr. Ed in the giant bed that he ordered for himself.  In lesser hands, Mister Ed could have been a ridiculous, terrible show.  In many ways, Mister Ed is ridiculous and absurd, but in a funny way.  

 

Aside from his role of Wilbur Post, Alan Young also provided the voice for Scrooge McDuck in one of my favorite childhood cartoons--Ducktales.  He also did voice work for some of my other favorite 80s cartoons: Alvin & The Chipmunks, and The Smurfs.  He also did a voice in an underrated Disney cartoon--The Great Mouse Detective. 

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RIP Alan Young.  It was somewhat comforting knowing that he was still alive.  It is very sad that he has passed.  It seems like most of my favorite Nick at Nite stars are gone now.

 

I love Mister Ed.  The relationship between Wilbur and Mr. Ed was very sweet and hilarious.  Much of the time, Mr. Ed's hijinks would end up making Wilbur look insane, much like how Jeannie made Major Nelson look bonkers in I Dream of Jeannie.  In the episode that Princess referred to, Mr. Ed has a cold and Wilbur is spending a lot of time in the barn.  His wife, Carol, is upset because Wilbur's time is monopolized by Ed.  She accuses Wilbur of spending too much money and time on Ed and even alludes to him caring more about Ed than he did about her.  Later, she's all dressed up because Wilbur promised to take her out to dinner.  He ends up going out to purchase some special feed (or something for Ed) and is detained.  This is the last straw for Carol and she threatens to leave Wilbur.  Later, Wilbur brings Carol and the Addisons into the barn to prove to them that he's not doting on Ed.  They walk in only to see Mr. Ed in the giant bed that he ordered for himself.  In lesser hands, Mister Ed could have been a ridiculous, terrible show.  In many ways, Mister Ed is ridiculous and absurd, but in a funny way.  

 

Aside from his role of Wilbur Post, Alan Young also provided the voice for Scrooge McDuck in one of my favorite childhood cartoons--Ducktales.  He also did voice work for some of my other favorite 80s cartoons: Alvin & The Chipmunks, and The Smurfs.  He also did a voice in an underrated Disney cartoon--The Great Mouse Detective. 

 

And what about TOM THUMB? Russ Tamblyn in the title role is absolutely memorable.

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And what about TOM THUMB? Russ Tamblyn in the title role is absolutely memorable.

Palmerin-- If you want to know all about Alan Young's career I suggest you read the book Mister Ed and Me and More. In this book Alan discusses his own life and his career with and without Mister Ed. Alan is a good storyteller.

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I recall that Eastwood episode.

 

Young was another example of how TV often paired average looking to below average looking men in shows and had hot looking wives.  Like WHITNEY BLAKE playing DON DeFORE'S wife in HAZEL.

 

But as a dedicated MR. ED viewer, it knocked me out back in the day upon seeing Young in THE TIME MACHINE when the film reached TV. 

 

Despite his age, It still saddened me to hear of his death.  That it DID still warrant mention on major network newscasts is  a sort of testament.

 

RIP Alan.

 

Sepiatone

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Alan Young was a very talented actor. He was really good at voice acting as well.

He will always be known best for his Wilber role on MISTER ED which is great-it couldn't have been an easy role.

 

I also highly recommend his autobiography, he is a talented writer too. This reinforces my feeling that to be a really good actor takes intelligence and command of language.

 

And someone here erroneously reported the demise of the horse that played Mr Ed. His death was actually caused from a medication given to him by accident according to HOLLYWOOD HOOFBEATS.

The horse's owner kept his death secret so not to upset the public, and didn't tell Alan Young for a long time as well.

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Not to detract too much, but I recall a comic somewhere bringing up a thought....

 

"Ever notice how much Mr. Ed sounds like Johnny Cash?  And did you ever notice you NEVER see the two of them in the same place at the same time?"

 

Sepiatone

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Love that show!

 

It's success was due to Young's ability to make this surreal idea come to life and Ed's [aka Bamboo Harvester, which I used to use as a trivia question to see how much people knew!] amazing abilities as a thinking horse.

 

So many favorite episodes, like the one I saw recently where Wilbur would not buy Ed a tv set so Ed starts selling real estate over the phone to make big commissions and buy his own color television.

 

RIP, Alan Young!

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use as a trivia question to see how much people knew

 

Pretty common knowledge even back then. The internet has killed any idea of trivia, imho.

 

As a horse owner, many of the ideas expressed in the show hold different humor. I recall once Wilbur scolding Ed for keeping his room a mess-then a quick cut to the stall floor with a halter, a couple of brushes & western saddle randomly placed on concrete.

Like a horse would handle his own saddle!

No bedding!

No manuer!

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M and a friend both wondered--

 

If there WAS an episode that showed Wilbur taking Ed out for a ride, WE never saw it!

 

And if not, one has to wonder WHY keep a horse anyway?

 

And around HERE at least, a person who owned a horse wouldn't, by city ordinance, be able to keep it in a stable on their own property in a heavily residential neighborhood.

 

Sepiatone

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use as a trivia question to see how much people knew

 

Pretty common knowledge even back then. The internet has killed any idea of trivia, imho.

 

As a horse owner, many of the ideas expressed in the show hold different humor. I recall once Wilbur scolding Ed for keeping his room a mess-then a quick cut to the stall floor with a halter, a couple of brushes & western saddle randomly placed on concrete.

Like a horse would handle his own saddle!

No bedding!

No manuer!

 

Yeah! And where'd he keep his fodder?

 

Maybe at his mudder's place?

 

(...sorry Bud and Lou, wherever you are)

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And around HERE at least, a person who owned a horse wouldn't, by city ordinance, be able to keep it in a stable on their own property in a heavily residential neighborhood.

 

Well, besides being a talking horse, Ed had "connections".

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Well, besides being a talking horse, Ed had "connections".

 

Oh! You must be talkin' about that rumor that said Scorsese had at first written a major part for him in GOODFELLAS but cut it all out just before filming began, right Eugenia?!

 

(...naaaah...no truth to that at all)

 

;)

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Oh! You must be talkin' about that rumor that said Scorsese had at first written a major part for him in GOODFELLAS but cut it all out just before filming began, right Eugenia?!

 

(...naaaah...no truth to that at all)

 

;)

 

Nah, that's not true.  But Ed had the offer to play in "The Godfather"....

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Nah, that's not true.  But Ed had the offer to play in "The Godfather"....

 

Oh yeah, THAT one!

 

Yep, he sure made the right decision to pass on THAT one, alright.

 

(...it's never a good idea for an actor to lose their heads over ANY part, ya know)

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Love that show!

 

It's success was due to Young's ability to make this surreal idea come to life and Ed's [aka Bamboo Harvester, which I used to use as a trivia question to see how much people knew!] amazing abilities as a thinking horse.

 

So many favorite episodes, like the one I saw recently where Wilbur would not buy Ed a tv set so Ed starts selling real estate over the phone to make big commissions and buy his own color television.

 

RIP, Alan Young!

 

My favorite episode is when Ed drives a milk truck. I remembered it being my fave when I saw it as a kid and recently saw it and it's still my favorite.

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T

 

M and a friend both wondered--

 

If there WAS an episode that showed Wilbur taking Ed out for a ride, WE never saw it!

 

And if not, one has to wonder WHY keep a horse anyway?

 

And around HERE at least, a person who owned a horse wouldn't, by city ordinance, be able to keep it in a stable on their own property in a heavily residential neighborhood.

 

Sepiatone

 

There are a number of episodes where Wilbur is riding Ed. One that stands out is where he's riding Ed in the park and Ed deliberately walks on the grass despite a sign that says to keep off the grass, which of course lands Wilbur in trouble with the law.

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