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Audrey Hepburn As A Villainess


Palmerin
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I like to imagine famous stars being cast against type. Think of Audrey H, and how her delicate features and big innocent eyes had her typecast as always the angelic heroine. Can you picture her as a sadistic monster, someone like Cathy Ames of EAST OF EDEN?

Who else would make interesting villains?

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Gene Tierney was a Memorable villainess in "The Egyptian" (1954) & "Leave Her to Heaven" (1945).

 

Audrey Hepburn wasn't Always Angelic--check out 1960's "The Unforgiven".

 

Jean Simmons was a fine villainess in "Angel Face" (1953).

 

Ingrid Bergman played a semi-villainess in "Under Capricorn" (1949) for Hitchcock--the only time she played a villainess on film, I think.

 

I would have liked to see Maureen O'Hara have a try at a villainess role--she would have been excellent.

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Maybe Doris Day in a "Misery" type movie, where she becomes obsessed with a famous person and traps/tortures him? (It would be more interesting if the victim were a man.)

Ooh.  Or Doris Day in a Fatal Attraction type role.  In one film, she could stalk Rock Hudson.  She won't be ignored.

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While Cary Grant somewhat played against type in Suspicion, I think he would have been great as a killer.  I also agree with Maureen O'Hara in some type of villain role.  People with exceptionally good looks and who are very charming would be the most deadly of villains, in that it would be easy to see others being easily taken in by someone who was extraordinarily attractive.  That's one of the reasons that Gene Tierney's character is so chilling in Leave Her to Heaven.  The scene in the lake is probably one of the disturbing scenes in film.  

 

Bette Davis in a swashbuckler would be interesting.

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Ingrid Bergman played a semi-villainess in "Under Capricorn" (1949) for Hitchcock--the only time she played a villainess on film, I think.

She was a murderess in Murder on the Orient Express, and was very unsympathetic in Autumn Sonata.
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Jean Simmons was a fine villainess in "Angel Face" (1953).

She was also the villainess in a Star Trek: The Next Generation episode (I think "The Drumhead", but I can't remember offhand without looking it up on IMDb), playing a special prosecutor who basically winds up going on an overzealous witch hunt even though that was never the intention.
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Think of Audrey H, and how her delicate features and big innocent eyes had her typecast as always the angelic heroine. Can you picture her as a sadistic monster,

Sure. Just replace her Givenchy wardrobe with off-the-rack stuff from the local Montgomery Ward. ;)
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While Cary Grant somewhat played against type in Suspicion, I think he would have been great as a killer.  I also agree with Maureen O'Hara in some type of villain role.  People with exceptionally good looks and who are very charming would be the most deadly of villains, in that it would be easy to see others being easily taken in by someone who was extraordinarily attractive.  That's one of the reasons that Gene Tierney's character is so chilling in Leave Her to Heaven.  The scene in the lake is probably one of the disturbing scenes in film.  

 

Bette Davis in a swashbuckler would be interesting.

Re: Grant in Suspicion:

 

Two endings were filmed. In one he was clearly guilty.

The ending we see was preferred by studios who believed his fans who never buy film as a killer unless he was in uniform and it was a war film.

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Well, she did play opposite Errol Flynn in Elizabeth and Essex ;)

 

Well yes, though that movie isn't really a swashbuckler.  As much as I love Davis (well I love Flynn too) I thought Errol was better in this film than she was.  She was too fidgety.  Though I admire her dedication to the role.  I thought Flora Robson's Elizabeth I portrayal in The Sea Hawk was better. 

 

I was thinking about Bette Davis in one of Maureen O'Hara's pirate roles.  Lol. 

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I was thinking about Bette Davis in one of Maureen O'Hara's pirate roles.  Lol. 

 

Can't see it happening - from a practical point of view. Those O'Hara pirate films were looked down upon (nor was Maureen taken seriously as an actress because of them) while Davis was pure status. Pure snobbism, I know, but that's the way both critics and studio heads looked at those swashbucklers.

 

Of course, the other thing is O'Hara was physically athletic and did her own stunt work, taking pride in her fencing ability. Can't see Bette doing that. Just not her thing.

 

Having said all that, the thought of Davis camping it up as a pirate queen with an all male crew jumping to her bidding, ridiculous as it sounds, also sounds like fun for that exact same reason.

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Greer Garson, playing a noir dame out to get revenge against the man who did her wrong.

Walter Pidgeon, or Robert Donat as the man about to suffer her womanly wrath.

 

Greer Garson as a selfish mother who walks out and abandons her family in their time of need

 

Liz Taylor as a shy wallflower

 

Barbara Stanwyck as  the doormat who lets men just walk over her

 

Marilyn Monroe as a drill instructor in a film about the WACs ( Women's Army Corps )

 

This is fun, I could go on all day  :lol:

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How about classy Irene Dunne as a streetwalker? And too bad Carole Lombard didn't live to do any noir femme fatale roles. That would have been interesting, assuming her acting could have pulled this off.

 

Lol.

 

Or Marjorie Main in a romantic role where she's got to fight men off with a stick!

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Maureen O'Hara as a possible villainess - THE FALLEN SPARROW, recently shown on TCM.

 

There's no reason she couldn't have played femme fatales like the Lizabeth Scott character in DEAD RECKONING.

 

Audrey Hepburn was dressed in off-the-rack clothes in TWO FOR THE ROAD to give her a more contemporary look, and not surprisingly, she rocked them just as if they were designer duds. I've often wondered if Audrey could have played a villain. TWO FOR THE ROAD is unbalanced because as soon as Albert Finney is mean to her, most of the audience simply hates him and takes Audrey's side.

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Audrey Hepburn was dressed in off-the-rack clothes in TWO FOR THE ROAD to give her a more contemporary look, and not surprisingly, she rocked them just as if they were designer duds. I've often wondered if Audrey could have played a villain. TWO FOR THE ROAD is unbalanced because as soon as Albert Finney is mean to her, most of the audience simply hates him and takes Audrey's side.

 

I would bet the rest of the audience hates her for being unfaithful to him. Finney has his share of fans, you know!

 

 

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Maureen O'Hara as a possible villainess - THE FALLEN SPARROW, recently shown on TCM.

 

There's no reason she couldn't have played femme fatales like the Lizabeth Scott character in DEAD RECKONING.

 

Audrey Hepburn was dressed in off-the-rack clothes in TWO FOR THE ROAD to give her a more contemporary look, and not surprisingly, she rocked them just as if they were designer duds. I've often wondered if Audrey could have played a villain.

It's her eyes I'm thinking about. Picture their innocent doe-like look being replaced by a cold harsh murderous glare--the kind that would terrify even a he man like William Holden.

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