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I've been watching the AIP films a lot and so enjoy the remarks of Roger Corman.

 

I've always liked him and have read numerous books on his films, and others who were Kings of the B's and operated on low budgets. But seeing him in person and hearing him talk is even more impressive than just reading about him.

 

He is literate, low key, humble, amusing, introspective in a very casual and down to earth way, and has given many insights into his career and those who worked with him in the TCM clips. I also think Ben Mankiewicz has done a fine job in his interviewing of him. One can see why Corman was so instrumental and conducive to many in their careers because he is laid back and pragmatic but still a very creative man who is used to making do without a giant budget behind him.

 

I think all those like Coppola, Nicholson, blah blah blah should get together and plan a tribute banquet to Corman, since he is in a class by himself and also a part of film history.

 

Not saying that his former employees don't appreciate him, but a testimonial dinner at this time in his life would seem most appropriate.

 

By the way, why is it that Corman never seems to age much? Other than the hair being a bit grayer he looks not too different from his visage of eons ago. Do you think he took some serum from a Vincent Price flick that made him "The Man Who Never Got Old"?

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You make it sound as if Corman is the film industry's DICK CLARK!  ;)

 

But it took too many years for people to take Corman serious in regards to his being a film maker.  Most merely saw him as an "Ed Wood with a budget".  But, like Castle, he saw "GOLD in them thar chills"  and looking back, actually DID put out a stream of although lower budgeted and oddball cheezy "scare" flicks, produced a library of the most highly regarded and fondly remembered films of the genre. AND largely copied.

 

Sure, I'll go along with the notion that Corman IS an important part of American film history.  If for nothing else, for at least helping to propel the career and genius of MARTIN SCORCESE.

 

 

Sepiatone

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You make it sound as if Corman is the film industry's DICK CLARK!  ;)

 

But it took too many years for people to take Corman serious in regards to his being a film maker.  Most merely saw him as an "Ed Wood with a budget".  But, like Castle, he saw "GOLD in them thar chills"  and looking back, actually DID put out a stream of although lower budgeted and oddball cheezy "scare" flicks, produced a library of the most highly regarded and fondly remembered films of the genre. AND largely copied.

 

Sure, I'll go along with the notion that Corman IS an important part of American film history.  If for nothing else, for at least helping to propel the career and genius of MARTIN SCORCESE.

 

 

Sepiatone

Ugh, and ycccky, Sepia!

 

I would never compare the fab Corman with that old reprobate, Dick Clark.

 

Apparently you've never read my chronic diatribes about the world's most annoying and oldest teenager and what I thought of him. Best left unsaid as someone from Philly here might put out a hit on me.

 

I realize Corman is not put in the league of a Fritz Lang, due to the strictures of the budgets and subject matter of his films, but that does not mean to me that he did not do amazing work with what he was given.

 

And in all honesty, being that Sam Z. Arkoff and the lot actually followed trends happening almost immediately by coming out with a film paralleling such events, many AIP films have more veracity about real life and the times, than big budget Hollywood films.

 

Just saying that Corman is a unique individual and anyone who made a film like "Little Shop of Horrors" or "Bucket of Blood" should be enshined in the Hollywood Hall of Fame.

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Being a horror fan, those films would be enough for me to appreciate Mr. Corman's output. But don't forget that he made films in a wide variety of genres, from JD flicks to crime dramas, social justice films, westerns and auto racing films and swords and sandals "epics"; the whole gamut.

 

And he was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Oscar in 2010.

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Being a horror fan, those films would be enough for me to appreciate Mr. Corman's output. But don't forget that he made films in a wide variety of genres, from JD flicks to crime dramas, social justice films, westerns and auto racing films and swords and sandals "epics"; the whole gamut.

 

And he was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Oscar in 2010.

Love every film he made, Lawrence but I was remiss in not mentioning his other output so thanks for bringing it up here!

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CaveGirl, you might enjoy this article about Corman receiving his honorary Oscar, where Jonathan Demme, Ron Howard, Jack Nicholson, and Peter Bogdadnovich were on hand to celebrate.

 

Thank you so much, Feego; I shall go there with alacrity asap!

 

I still think Nicholson owes Corman a dinner and a gold watch for letting him play the dental patient as if he were Walter Denton from the tv show "Our Miss Brooks"!

 

I forgot to mention the book about Corman, which is a great read called:

 

"Crab Monsters, Teenage Cavemen, and Candy Stripe Nurses: Roger Corman: King of the B Movie"  by Chris Nashawaty
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I enjoyed Roger Corman's visit very much. He just seems like the kind of the person that would be easy to talk with -- unlike some of the directors who benefitted from his tutelage.

 

Don't get me wrong, I totally respect Scorsese and all of the other graduates of the "Roger Corman Film School" but, with the possible exception of Ron Howard, I can't see myself having a laid-back, pleasant conversation with any of them. Not that I would ever get that chance to chat with any of these people . . . but, you know, one can't help but daydream about how fun it would be to meet Mr. Corman and ask him lots more questions about his movies!

 

Maybe if I paid the fee for that backstage thing that might happen? Yeah, I don't think so.

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I enjoyed Roger Corman's visit very much. He just seems like the kind of the person that would be easy to talk with -- unlike some of the directors who benefitted from his tutelage.

 

Don't get me wrong, I totally respect Scorsese and all of the other graduates of the "Roger Corman Film School" but, with the possible exception of Ron Howard, I can't see myself having a laid-back, pleasant conversation with any of them. Not that I would ever get that chance to chat with any of these people . . . but, you know, one can't help but daydream about how fun it would be to meet Mr. Corman and ask him lots more questions about his movies!

 

Maybe if I paid the fee for that backstage thing that might happen? Yeah, I don't think so.

corman completely lost my respect by Attack of the 50 Foot Cheerleader not being more like the 1958 allison hayes classic.

 

it wasn't even as good as Village of the Giants.

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corman completely lost my respect by Attack of the 50 Foot Cheerleader not being more like the 1958 allison hayes classic.

 

it wasn't even as good as Village of the Giants.

Yeah, you have a point, Nip but AOTFFC did bring Mary Woronov of "Eating Raoul" fame out of retirement so you owe Corman respect for that.

 

Admittedly "Village of the Giants" is a monumental artistic success to try to duplicate.

 

My guess is that you just have a thing for Allison Hayes. I'll send you my dvd copy of "The Hypnotic Eye" if it would make you feel better?

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Well I'm glad he was given time on TCM along with a retrospective of his work. I do think he has aged rapidly since the last time I saw him, but hey, he's OLDER and still looks great. I've always loved his calm, well spoken manner. 

 

Corman's films used to be what we kids laughed about as "cheesy" but in later years I found many many of his B movies rather charming. For the most part, their production values are pretty good-the story flow, editing, sound, lighting, etc. And at best Corman's films capture a feeling of a tumultuous time period, even when missing the mark like ROCK & ROLL HIGH SCHOOL.

 

I'm glad he's been recognised for his bulk output and contribution to film. And I like how he's come across as "host" on TCM.

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Am currently reading Corman's great book - "How I Made A Hundred Movies In Hollywood And Never Lost A Dime" - HIGHLY RECOMMENDED for any fans of him and AIP.

 

Link to the Book

 

Thanks for the link,and welcome to the boards, Golden.  :)

 

 

Sepiatone

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