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Pardon my obtuseness.. . .


slaytonf
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Watching Kelly's Heroes tonite got me to thinking of heist movies (when you think of it, that's what is at the core).  What distinguishes this is they got the gold.  The production code previously required all movies to show crime never pays.  Kelly's Heroes obviously was made post-code.  Since they got away with it, I wondered what was the first heist movie where the thieves were successful.  I don't mean early pre code-enforcement movies like Trouble in Paradise (1932), or Jewell Robbery (1932), but later as, or after the code deteriorated.

 

I know there was a thread on this topic last year sometime, but I forget.

 

 

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Seven Thieves (1960): The main protagonists come out ahead, although not necessarily in the way they intended.

 

The War Wagon (1967): The robbers end up with about 1/5 of what they intended to steal, and in no trouble with the law.

 

Who's Minding The Mint (1967): Although attempting to "steal" much more, the gang ends up with just enough money to cover what Jim Hutton lost and generously give it to him. However at the end (actually after the end, during the credits) we see them going after the rest of the money.

 

Fitzwilly (1967): No one goes to jail after the big robbery, and a deus ex machina plot contrivance gives everybody a happy ending. Clearly 1967 was a breakthrough year for Hollywood heists.

 

If you want to search you may be able to find exceptions even during the code era, especially in westerns. Don't Alan Ladd and company get away with it in The Badlanders (1958)? Gary Cooper ends up with the treasure in Vera Cruz (1954) but gives it to the Juaristas.

 

In Invisible Stripes (1940) George Raft is killed after pulling several robberies so he and his brother William Holden can buy an auto garage and "go straight". IIRC at the end we see Holden and his girl standing in front of their new garage. George may be gone, but little brother still got to keep the money...

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It could be said that perpetrators profit by heist in: How to Steal a Million (1966). They steal a statue which has no value but purpose of the crime is to steal it before authorities learn that it has no value.

 

One of the perpetrators in: Gambit (1966) will clearly profit quite handsomely by combination of crimes. They plot to steal priceless bust. They succeed. 

 

Spoiler Alert!

 

Following paragraph contains plot information which is very important to ending:

 

 

 

 

 

It is revealed then that they do not want it and had left it where owner could recover it safely. They had stolen it only to generate newspaper headlines concerning its theft because they planned to sell fakes to collectors who sought illicit works of art. One of those in the plot walks away before collecting but other one is shown preparing to deliver a fake to a buyer and had other fakes ready for sale. 

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It could be said that perpetrators profit by heist in: How to Steal a Million (1966). They steal a statue which has no value but purpose of the crime is to steal it before authorities learn that it has no value.

 

One of the perpetrators in: Gambit (1966) will clearly profit quite handsomely by combination of crimes. They plot to steal priceless bust. They succeed. 

 

Spoiler Alert!

 

Following paragraph contains plot information which is very important to ending:

 

 

 

 

 

It is revealed then that they do not want it and had left it where owner could recover it safely. They had stolen it only to generate newspaper headlines concerning its theft because they planned to sell fakes to collectors who sought illicit works of art. One of those in the plot walks away before collecting but other one is shown preparing to deliver a fake to a buyer and had other fakes ready for sale. 

In THE HOT ROCK, Redford's group is ultimately successful, no?

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One of my best friends growing up really loved THE THOMAS CROWN AFFAIR because, in addition to Steve McQueen being the coolest guy on Earth, it was the first film he ever saw where the criminal got away with it, which blew his mind. I'm sure it's not the first, but it's a relatively early example of the changing content standards.

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I was going to enter tonight's OCEAN'S ELEVEN, but as they "got away" with the heist, they didn't wind up with the money.

 

So, would that count?

 

And it does precede many of the others mentioned.

 

 

Sepiatone

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I was going to enter tonight's OCEAN'S ELEVEN, but as they "got away" with the heist, they didn't wind up with the money.

 

So, would that count?

 

I would say no

 

In the same year's Seven Thieves the thieves do not keep the money they stole, but they do get something else and come out ahead. That's not quite what the OP is looking for either, but it's getting there.

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Watching Kelly's Heroes tonite got me to thinking of heist movies (when you think of it, that's what is at the core).  What distinguishes this is they got the gold.  The production code previously required all movies to show crime never pays.  Kelly's Heroes obviously was made post-code.  Since they got away with it, I wondered what was the first heist movie where the thieves were successful.  I don't mean early pre code-enforcement movies like Trouble in Paradise (1932), or Jewell Robbery (1932), but later as, or after the code deteriorated.

 

I know there was a thread on this topic last year sometime, but I forget.

 

 

This is not a crime but a war movie and the rules regarding criminal behaviour don't apply here.  Ever heard of the expression "The spoils of war"?  Doubt if the Code would had come into play in this case.

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This is not a crime but a war movie and the rules regarding criminal behaviour don't apply here.  Ever heard of the expression "The spoils of war"?  Doubt if the Code would had come into play in this case.

 

I agree with you that war movies go by slightly different rules, as do westerns. See my earlier comments on Cooper and Vera Cruz, which might be classified as a war western.

 

However, if Kelly's Heroes had been made 20 or even 10 years earlier, the production code would not have allowed them to profit from their actions. There would have been a "charity" ending, where the Kelly gang donate the gold to rebuild an orphanage, or an "ironic" ending where the gold is unknowingly melted down by the French to build a statue of conquering hero General Carroll O'Connor.

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I agree with you that war movies go by slightly different rules, as do westerns. See my earlier comments on Cooper and Vera Cruz, which might be classified as a war western.

 

However, if Kelly's Heroes had been made 20 or even 10 years earlier, the production code would not have allowed them to profit from their actions. There would have been a "charity" ending, where the Kelly gang donate the gold to rebuild an orphanage, or an "ironic" ending where the gold is unknowingly melted down by the French to build a statue of conquering hero General Carroll O'Connor.

 

I'm picturing the statue of Carroll O'Conner in my mind. :lol:

 

Your post is ironic...

 

http://www.onesixthwarriors.com/forum/sixth-scale-action-figure-news-reviews-discussion/704462-carroll-oconner-commission-sculpt.html

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I would add the 1969 version of "The Italian Job" -- starring Sir Michael Caine -- as a qualified maybe. The plot involves the brilliant use of Mini Cooper S cars during the getaway. But the movie ends with a literal cliffhanger, so no one knows if they actually wound up with $4 million in gold. 

 

THE-ITALIAN-JOB.jpg?itok=GqEKjZDq

Caine and company pull off "The Italian Job" (1969) using Mini Coopers

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However, if Kelly's Heroes had been made 20 or even 10 years earlier, the production code would not have allowed them to profit from their actions. There would have been a "charity" ending, where the Kelly gang donate the gold to rebuild an orphanage, or an "ironic" ending where the gold is unknowingly melted down by the French to build a statue of conquering hero General Carroll O'Connor.

Or they could give the money back to the people they robbed it from, like Gregory Peck in Yellow Sky, who even gets Anne Baxter at the end.

 

And if they're going to melt down the gold, they should make miniature Eiffel Towers with it. ;)

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I would add the 1969 version of "The Italian Job" -- starring Sir Michael Caine -- as a qualified maybe. The plot involves the brilliant use of Mini Cooper S cars during the getaway. But the movie ends with a literal cliffhanger, so no one knows if they actually wound up with $4 million in gold. 

 

THE-ITALIAN-JOB.jpg?itok=GqEKjZDq

Caine and company pull off "The Italian Job" (1969) using Mini Coopers

 

 

We have to remember, the "code" only applied in America. In other parts of the world, there was no code at all. Heroes got shot, robbers got away with crimes and so on. 

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Sounds like a horror movie to me.

 

 

I would say no

 

In the same year's Seven Thieves the thieves do not keep the money they stole, but they do get something else and come out ahead. That's not quite what the OP is looking for either, but it's getting there.

 

 

For the purposes of discussion--and what else is there here but discussion?--I'd have to say getting away with it means the thieves get what they went after, and nothing bad happens to them, at least as far as we know.  So even though in Duffy (1968), which is one of my favorite heist movies, nobody goes to jail, and Duffy walks off with a big reward, and Lou Rawls sings a killer song, you can't say they got away with it.  In The Hot Rock (1972), yeah, they got away with it.  And in Dead Heat on a Merry-Go-Round (1966), they did get away with it, even though as it turns out, it would have been better for Coburn's character if he hadn't gone to the trouble of the heist.  That's the earliest get-away-with-it movie I can think of.

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While the following "neo-noir" classic was made 6 years after the Production Code went the way of the Dodo and was replaced by the MPAA film rating system(and so I'm not really sure why I'm mentioning it, but I will anyway), if you folks think about it, Noah Cross(John Huston) here...

film-noir-chinatown-1974-john-huston-noa

 

...sure gets away with one of the biggest "thefts" in cinematic history.

 

(...like almost the whole San Fernando Valley before it was turned into what it is today)

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While the following "neo-noir" classic was made 6 years after the Production Code went the way of the Dodo and was replaced by the MPAA film rating system(and so I'm not really sure why I'm mentioning it, but I will anyway), if you folks think about it, Noah Cross(John Huston) here...

film-noir-chinatown-1974-john-huston-noa

 

...sure gets away with one of the biggest "thefts" in cinematic history.

 

(...like almost the whole San Fernando Valley before it was turned into what it is today)

If Karl Malden had played Jake Gittes, they would have had to blow the budget for bandages.

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We have to remember, the "code" only applied in America. In other parts of the world, there was no code at all. Heroes got shot, robbers got away with crimes and so on. 

 

I do believe it WAS America the OP was referring to.  And I don't recall him making any comparisons to anywhere else.  :rolleyes:

 

Sepiatone

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I did only have domestic movies in mind when I started the thread.  But now I think of it, I don't know of any heist movies I've seen from around the world made contemporary with code times in America that have the thieves getting away with it.  Not that I've seen many of them.  

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I don't know of any heist movies I've seen from around the world made contemporary with code times in America that have the thieves getting away with it. 

 

 

The first which comes to my mind is: Alibaba and 40 Thieves (1954). It has Alibaba finding the cave in which a gang of thieves keep their loot. He steals from it. Other things happen and then the thieves come for him. The thieves are killed and Alibaba goes on to live well on their accumulated wealth.

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The first which comes to my mind is: Alibaba and 40 Thieves (1954). It has Alibaba finding the cave in which a gang of thieves keep their loot. He steals from it. Other things happen and then the thieves come for him. The thieves are killed and Alibaba goes on to live well on their accumulated wealth.

 

Eeh! I always MUCH preferred the shorter version of this story, aka...ALI BABA BUNNY.

 

And which of course features those classic lines...

 

tumblr_ls1zubxWRG1qd21hmo1_500.jpg

"Saaay! Since when is Pismo Beach in a cave?!"

 

 

Ali+Baba+Bunny+%282%29.jpg

"Open Sarsaparilla? Open Saskatchewan?"

 

AND of course the ever popular...

 

AliBaba1_9025.jpg

"Hassan, CHOP!"

 

;)

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