Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

information you've just discovered....


Dargo
 Share

Recommended Posts

In my case, it was last night and after the gorgeous Madeleine Stowe mentioned in passing the name of Bill Hickman while introducing THE SEVEN-UPS.

 

During the showing of this film, I grabbed this PC and googled him, and while I already knew he was a stuntman specializing in high speed car chases and perhaps best known as the hitman and driver of the black Dodge Charger RT in BULLITT...

 

3298d-hickman.png?w=207&h=200

 

...I discovered that James Dean died in his arms after Dean's wreck of his Porsche 550 Spyder in 1955. Hickman had been driving the Ford station wagon that was a support vehicle for Dean's racing venture to a central California racetrack and was just a few miles behind Dean's car when the accident happened.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Hickman

 

 

(...and so, what little tidbit of cinematic information have YOU recently learned after something you've just watched or heard on TCM intrigued you enough to research it on the internet?)

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my case, it was while I was checking the credits of "The Red Mill" (1926), on TCMs webpage for it. I noticed the director was a William Goodrich; that rang a bell in my mind, and I looked the name up on Wikipedia.  

 

WG was one of a series of pseudonyms used by former Silent star Fatty Arbuckle, whose film career was ended by the 1921 scandal surrounding his (possible) involvement in the death of  Virginia Rappe.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mine comes in the form of trivia. As Cleopatra (1963) begins, I check it out on our TCMDb and Wiki to find the film earned Elizabeth Taylor a Guinness World Record title, "Most costume changes in a film"; Taylor made 65 costume changes. This record was beaten in 1996 in the film Evita by Madonna with 85 costume changes.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I discovered earlier today that Helen Hayes and Fred Astaire played a married couple in a TV movie from the late 1970s. I never knew they had ever acted together. 

 

The telefilm is called A Family Upside Down. Their grown daughter is played by Patty Duke. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

     I used to own a nice original Columbia Home Video tape of 'A FAMILY UPSIDE DOWN' (1978-Tvm).  Except I was a moron and stored the tape out in the pole barn (it's not really a barn, but a storage area that my folks call the 'pole barn') with a malfunctioning de-humidifier.  The tape, along with many other Columbia VHS tapes I owned, went to Mould City.  I still have the video box, though. 

 

     I shall endeavor to go now to Amazon and buy myself another Columbia tape of 'UPSIDE DOWN'.  Glad I read this; thanks for reminding me (indirectly), TopBilled. 

 

      For those who dig TVM's on Columbia here's a couple other titles they released; I have these and thankfully they didn't get mouldy before I moved them in to my house.     

 

     FALLEN ANGEL (1981-Tvm) C-100m.  Richard Masur, Dana Hill, Melinda Dillon, Ronny Cox. 

 

     SHINING SEASON, A (1979-Tvm)  C-100m.  Timothy Bottoms, Allyn Ann McLerie, Rip Torn. 

 

      Couple more Columbia releases of TVM's I don't have but ought to get!

 

     EARLY FROST, An (1985) C-100m.  Rowlands, Gazzara + Aidan Quinn

     CURSE OF KING TUT'S TOMB, The (1980) C-100m.  w/Eva Marie Saint  

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

     I used to own a nice original Columbia Home Video tape of 'A FAMILY UPSIDE DOWN' (1978-Tvm).  Except I was a moron and stored the tape out in the pole barn (it's not really a barn, but a storage area that my folks call the 'pole barn') with a malfunctioning de-humidifier.  The tape, along with many other Columbia VHS tapes I owned, went to Mould City.  I still have the video box, though. 

 

     I shall endeavor to go now to Amazon and buy myself another Columbia tape of 'UPSIDE DOWN'.  Glad I read this; thanks for reminding me (indirectly), TopBilled. 

 

      For those who dig TVM's on Columbia here's a couple other titles they released; I have these and thankfully they didn't get mouldy before I moved them in to my house.     

 

     FALLEN ANGEL (1981-Tvm) C-100m.  Richard Masur, Dana Hill, Melinda Dillon, Ronny Cox. 

 

     SHINING SEASON, A (1979-Tvm)  C-100m.  Timothy Bottoms, Allyn Ann McLerie, Rip Torn. 

 

      Couple more Columbia releases of TVM's I don't have but ought to get!

 

     EARLY FROST, An (1985) C-100m.  Rowlands, Gazzara + Aidan Quinn

     CURSE OF KING TUT'S TOMB, The (1980) C-100m.  w/Eva Marie Saint  

Thanks for the information. I haven't seen the other titles you mentioned, but A Family Upside Down is on YouTube. I plan to watch it later today. Yesterday, I watched one that had Olivia De Havilland from 1972, called The Screaming Woman. It was made by Universal. I think Columbia, Universal and Aaron Spelling Productions were the leaders with all those great TV movies of the 70s and 80s.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my case, it was last night and after the gorgeous Madeleine Stowe mentioned in passing the name of Bill Hickman while introducing THE SEVEN-UPS.

 

During the showing of this film, I grabbed this PC and googled him, and while I already knew he was a stuntman specializing in high speed car chases and perhaps best known as the hitman and driver of the black Dodge Charger RT in BULLITT...

 

3298d-hickman.png?w=207&h=200

 

...I discovered that James Dean died in his arms after Dean's wreck of his Porsche 550 Spyder in 1955. Hickman had been driving the Ford station wagon that was a support vehicle for Dean's racing venture to a central California racetrack and was just a few miles behind Dean's car when the accident happened.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Hickman

 

 

(...and so, what little tidbit of cinematic information have YOU recently learned after something you've just watched or heard on TCM intrigued you enough to research it on the internet?)

Unfortunately, my laziness usually trumps my intrigue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kid Dabb--Your post got me thinking.  At 65 costume changes Elizabeth Taylor would have had a new costume every 4.2 minutes if my math is correct (TCM's running time for "Cleopatra" (1963) is 243 minutes).  "Evita" (1996) runs only 134 minutes; so at 85 costume changes for the film, Madonna would have had a new costume every 1.6 something minutes in "Evita".  The mind boggles. :unsure:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kid Dabb--Your post got me thinking.  At 65 costume changes Elizabeth Taylor would have had a new costume every 4.2 minutes if my math is correct (TCM's running time for "Cleopatra" (1963) is 243 minutes).  "Evita" (1996) runs only 134 minutes; so at 85 costume changes for the film, Madonna would have had a new costume every 1.6 something minutes in "Evita".  The mind boggles. :unsure:

 

I understand both productions had physics professors consulting so they could stop time.

:P

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bravo, Dargo for coming up with a super topic that I hope lasts for years here!

 

I was watching reruns [what else!] of the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson the other nite on Antenna and when I heard that the guest was Milton Berle, well I just had to watch.

 

He was hilarious as usual, and started talking about how he was turning eighty [rerun was from 1988 I think] and that he was supplying NBC with his personal collection of old film and kinescopes from his tv show and they were compiling bits with folks like Elvis, Sinatra and so on for a special to be broadcast.

 

He said that when Elvis had been booked to play on his show, Berle met the plane himself at the airport, and after Colonel Parker and Elvis had gotten in the limo, Berle got out paperwork and the contract for the show to be seen by Elvis, and immediately Parker slapped Miltie's wrist and said quite authoritatively "Don't show that to the boy!" with major emphasis on "The Boy". 

Berle of course concluded that Elvis was pretty much always left in the dark about such business matters, and his firsthand report was interesting to hear.

 

I really enjoyed hearing this inside story about one of Presley's very first tv appearances [after of course the Dorsey show but way before Sullivan's] and think it shows exactly how controlling Parker was of his golden boy. Who else in the history of show biz as an agent ever got 50% of the take???

 

Love all the newfound revelations in this thread!

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bravo, Dargo for coming up with a super topic that I hope lasts for years here!

 

I was watching reruns [what else!] of the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson the other nite on Antenna and when I heard that the guest was Milton Berle, well I just had to watch.

 

He was hilarious as usual, and started talking about how he was turning eighty [rerun was from 1988 I think] and that he was supplying NBC with his personal collection of old film and kinescopes from his tv show and they were compiling bits with folks like Elvis, Sinatra and so on for a special to be broadcast.

 

He said that when Elvis had been booked to play on his show, Berle met the plane himself at the airport, and after Colonel Parker and Elvis had gotten in the limo, Berle got out paperwork and the contract for the show to be seen by Elvis, and immediately Parker slapped Miltie's wrist and said quite authoritatively "Don't show that to the boy!" with major emphasis on "The Boy". 

 

Berle of course concluded that Elvis was pretty much always left in the dark about such business matters, and his firsthand report was interesting to hear.

 

I really enjoyed hearing this inside story about one of Presley's very first tv appearances [after of course the Dorsey show but way before Sullivan's] and think it shows exactly how controlling Parker was of his golden boy. Who else in the history of show biz as an agent ever got 50% of the take???

 

Love all the newfound revelations in this thread!

 

To me that story shows how dumb Elvis was.    Ok,  often the initial contract is very unfair to the artist since the artist is just starting out and could be insecure, and swayed by 'big bucks' and fame.    But after the Olivia DeHavilland decision wasn't the length of a contract capped?   So I don't understand why Elvis continued to ALLOW Parker to be his agent.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To me that story shows how dumb Elvis was.    Ok,  often the initial contract is very unfair to the artist since the artist is just starting out and could be insecure, and swayed by 'big bucks' and fame.    But after the Olivia DeHavilland decision wasn't the length of a contract capped?   So I don't understand why Elvis continued to ALLOW Parker to be his agent.

I think from everything I've ever read about Elvis, that it was his sense of gratitude to Parker that kept him from ever disputing the terms of the contract, James.

 

Now you just may be right, maybe he was just dumb too, but he seemed to be a nice guy who was so appreciative of the chances he got due to what he thought Parker did, that he never cared to renegotiate his contract. Didn't Parker once tell him, "You've got a million dollars worth of talent and now I can get you a million dollars" or something like that.

 

If you've read that very insightful book about Elvis by Albert Goldman, it is true that Parker was a master con man, who even thought up ways to make money from haters, when he started marketing not only "I Love Elvis" buttons but also "I Hate Elvis". As a carny veteran whose act was a chicken dancing, due to being on a hotplate, the Colonel also falsified his own origins and was an illegal immigrant from Holland I think. The book documents his background and his belief that Elvis should never play engagements outside the US, due to the fact that not having a passport would prevent Parker from ever getting back in the US, and he always was accompanying the star, probably to make sure he had all control in his hands.

 

I think Parker was a real con artist, but then I also don't know if anyone else could have propelled Elvis to the heights he reached without him. Parker constructed a whole persona for Elvis, that in some ways served him well for years. Maybe Elvis enjoyed being the dumb victim and just wanted to buy Cadillacs for strangers he met at car dealerships, and liked to ride around Memphis with the Memphis Mafia who also were good at using him for their benefit. Maybe he was just a victim of many people and went downhill after the death of his beloved Gladys. I think the Colonel even prevented him from signing on for the remake of "A Star is Born" with Barbra Streisand saying Elvis should not be second billed, but that movie might have opened up new doors for Presley. A lot of unanswered questions for sure, but I would pay big money to know if Elvis ever had his IQ actually read!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I've just discovered to my amazement that there are people in Tanzania and such who hunt those with albinism, for their body parts which the former use in ritual practices.

 

Sounds like some unbelievable plot from a witch doctor movie where they are hunting albinos for not just their heads but the whole shebang, but this is real supposedly as I heard it on public television news.

 

Being that I want Dargo's thread to continue till the Kennedy assassination files are open to the public, I shall be reporting new facts learned daily unless someone else here takes up the slack.

 

Next!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I've just discovered to my amazement that there are people in Tanzania and such who hunt those with albinism, for their body parts which the former use in ritual practices.

 

Sounds like some unbelievable plot from a witch doctor movie where they are hunting albinos for not just their heads but the whole shebang, but this is real supposedly as I heard it on public television news.

 

Being that I want Dargo's thread to continue till the Kennedy assassination files are open to the public, I shall be reporting new facts learned daily unless someone else here takes up the slack.

 

Next!

 

And thus the very reason why Johnny Winter and his brother Edgar always refused any concert dates in that country. ;)

 

(...and thanks for keeping my thread alive, CG...I was kind'a surprised there were so few responses to its premise...would've thought it the perfect place for people to express some new-found bit of cinematic related info they've run across)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And thus the very reason why Johnny Winter and his brother Edgar always refused any concert dates in that country. ;)

 

(...and thanks for keeping my thread alive, CG...I was kind'a surprised there were so few responses to its premise...would've thought it the perfect place for people to express some new-found bit of cinematic related info they've run across)

Yeah, and that's also why the husband of one of those peroxided King Sisters, that Albino Rey guy, never went there in concert either probably.

 

As to why your thread got so few responses, well I can only attribute it to the fact that a lot of people nowadays do not appreciate true quality and things of culture obviously.

 

That's why they'd rather listen to a song about an ex-boyfriend of Taylor Twit than watch a play by Ibsen.

 

Yes, Dargo and Ibsen, two princes of men and aristocrats of the mind surely!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

Yeah, and that's also why the husband of one of those peroxided King Sisters, that Albino Rey guy, never went there in concert either probably.

 

As to why your thread got so few responses, well I can only attribute it to the fact that a lot of people nowadays do not appreciate true quality and things of culture obviously.

 

That's why they'd rather listen to a song about an ex-boyfriend of Taylor Twit than watch a play by Ibsen.

 

Yes, Dargo and Ibsen, two princes of men and aristocrats of the mind surely!

 

Wow, CG! Gotta say that that's some pretty heady company you've got me with there!

 

I mean, me and the great Mr. Ibsen, EH?!

 

But NOW I gotta say I've just learned ANOTHER little bit of info here, and all thanks to YOU!

 

Uh-huh! Ya see, I didn't know he wrote plays TOO?! Nope, all I PREVIOUSLY knew of the guy was that he danced pretty well, once almost died because of some dire reaction to aluminum dust, AND played a hillbilly on TV!!!

 

And so it seems, once again I owe ya one!!!

 

(...saw this one comin' down the ol' pike before even readin' the fourth sentence, didn't ya) ;)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

While not "Earth shattering", I found out....

 

Well, for years and for some reason, I was always under the impression that it was VLADIMIR HOROWITZ who provided the piano playing for A SONG TO REMEMBER and it was HIS hands being shown playing in close ups.

 

But while looking it up I found out the playing was done by virtuoso JOSE ITURBI instead, and the hands were those of a 22 year old(at the time) concert pianist ERWIN NYIRGYHAZI , and also that a young DARREN McGAVIN played one of ELSNER'S students in the film.

 

 

Sepiatone

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Last night while watching "Sunset Blvd." for the umpteenth time, I noticed in the credits the name Franklyn Farnum [1878-1961].

 

I thought to myself "Wasn't he a silent screen Western star?" so I immediately got out my silent screen encyclopedia book with all the photos of actors, so I could recognize him as I watched. Well, I got to the end of the film, and was still wondering where he was in the movie. I was thinking he was maybe the entrance guard at Paramount Studios, but no, it turns out the poor guy was the undertaker!!!

 

But now in researching Mr. Farnum, I find besides being in silents and in talkies as mostly an extra he has another distinction. Apparently he appeared in more movies that were awarded the Best Picture as winner, than any other actor in history. Franklyn was in the films The Life of Emile Zola (1937), Going My Way (1944) (uncredited), The Lost Weekend (1945), Gentleman's Agreement (1947) (uncredited), All About Eve (1950) (uncredited), The Greatest Show on Earth (1952), and Around the World in Eighty Days (1956) (uncredited).

 

Uncredited or not, it is still something to be proud of! Sorry for ending with a preposition...

 

P.S. I still feel sorry for him that his face was not even seen [except maybe by the monkey!] in the undertaking scene in SB.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, CG! Gotta say that that's some pretty heady company you've got me with there!

 

I mean, me and the great Mr. Ibsen, EH?!

 

But NOW I gotta say I've just learned ANOTHER little bit of info here, and all thanks to YOU!

 

Uh-huh! Ya see, I didn't know he wrote plays TOO?! Nope, all I PREVIOUSLY knew of the guy was that he danced pretty well, once almost died because of some dire reaction to aluminum dust, AND played a hillbilly on TV!!!

 

And so it seems, once again I owe ya one!!!

 

(...saw this one comin' down the ol' pike before even readin' the fourth sentence, didn't ya) ;)

I think you forgot to mention that Miss Jane Hathaway could not stand Mr. Ibsen and hated his guts!

 

I bet you didn't know that one, Dargo.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think you forgot to mention that Miss Jane Hathaway could not stand Mr. Ibsen and hated his guts!

 

I bet you didn't know that one, Dargo.

 

Yep, actually I did, CG.

 

I remember hearing or reading someplace that she greatly resented his campaigning for her opponent when she later entered the political field and ran for some office somewhere.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yesterday, while watching credits for "Beast From Haunted Cave" (1961), I noticed it was directed by a Monte Hellman; the first film of the director of "The Shooting", "Ride in the Whirlwind (both 1967)**, and "China 9, Liberty 37" (1978), all interesting Westerns.

 

**--TCM release date is 1972 for TS and RITW.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I discovered that Otto Kruger was the grand-nephew of Paul Kruger, who was President of the South African Republic (i.e. Transvaal) from 1883-1900. 

 

"Otto Kruger (September 6, 1885 – September 6, 1974) was an American actor, originally a Broadway matinee idol, who established a niche as a charming villain in films, such as Hitchcock's Saboteur. He also appeared in CBS's Perry Mason and other TV series. He was the grandnephew of South African president Paul Kruger."

 

gold_south_african_krugerrands.png

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep, actually I did, CG.

 

I remember hearing or reading someplace that she greatly resented his campaigning for her opponent when she later entered the political field and ran for some office somewhere.

Maybe that silver or aluminum paint made him cranky chronically?

 

I should have known you knew being the walking fount of knowledge you are!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yesterday, while watching credits for "Beast From Haunted Cave" (1961), I noticed it was directed by a Monte Hellman; the first film of the director of "The Shooting", "Ride in the Whirlwind (both 1967)**, and "China 9, Liberty 37" (1978), all interesting Westerns.

 

**--TCM release date is 1972 for TS and RITW.

I watched and really loved "TBFHC"!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I discovered that Otto Kruger was the grand-nephew of Paul Kruger, who was President of the South African Republic (i.e. Transvaal) from 1883-1900. 

 

gold_south_african_krugerrands.png

Similarly, I was just told that Omar Sharif was the son of a tentmaker and this guy on the street sold me an autographed tent from his car trunk!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...