Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Titanic or A Night to Remember?


Recommended Posts

I get the impression that many of you here disliked the James Cameron version of Titanic. I thoroughly enjoyed it and feel it gave a much better story than Night to Remember. The steerage passengers were better portrayed in Titanic, and the beauty of the ship itself was amazing. Also, I preferred the breakup of the ship at the end. Night to Remember did not go into personalities either. I have other differences but would like to hear yours, while I go watch Silent Sunday.

 

Any comments?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe I'm just too much of an old movie buff, but every time that I watch " A Night to Remember ", my eyes water and I am next to if not actually crying. Fifteen to thirty minutes into Cameron's fiasco I was screaming at the screen when will it be over. I couldn't watch even an hour of the newer version. It was just very boring.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've seen "Titanic" several times and I do enjoy it for what it is. However, when it comes to a choice, I've got to go with "A Night To Remember". It's so much closer to Walter Lord's definitive book, of the same name, there's no comparison. If you prefer the newer film go for it. As for me the "real" Titanic film will always be "A Night To Remember".

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll be the odd one out and say that I loved the 1953 version of Titanic the best. I know it's not historically accurate, but I'll watch anything with Barbara Stanwyck and Clifton Webb and they really brought the story to life. The interpersonal relationships are great and the ending is a complete tearjerker for me. From everyone singing, the little boy running back to Webb, and right down to how the ship cracks in half. Love that version.

 

I was a teenager when the 1997 Titanic came out and I remember never being able to see it in the theaters, because everytime my friends and I would go, every theater was sold out! A lot of my "meh"-ness on the movie is because of DiCaprio--don't love him, but I don't hate him either. He's just never done anything for me. I do like Kate Winslet and I thought she was good, but the high point of that version was Kathy Bates' Molly Brown. The special effects were amazing and worth seeing just for that, but a lot of it was ruined because I already knew what was going to happen to Leo at the end.

 

A Night to Remember is good, but like you said heidigunn, it didn't delve into personalites enough for my tastes. I like to get emotionally involved with the passengers lives. It's a beautiful movie though, but as with all the Titanic movies, they're just horribly depressing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm with you Heidi. I saw A Night To Remember for the first time last night after reading all the raves on this board and I'm afraid I prefer Cameron's Titanic. Like you said, you really don't get to know any of the characters in Night like you do in Titanic and it just left me cold. But I think you and I will be in the minority on this board :-)

 

Brad

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm with Sugarpuss. I love the Barbara Stanwyck/Clifton Webb version of Titanic. A real tear jerker and much more of a story than A Night to Remember. Although Night is much more historically accurate, I like a good story. In this case I know the story of the Titanic and that's why I prefer a "good story" such as Titanic 1953.

Cameron's Titanic is a very good story and I like getting to know the characters and the photography is awesome.

Susu

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never seen Cameron's "Titanic." I don't really like the 1953 "Titanic," which was a bit too soap operaish for me. (Also, I happened to read the playright Christopher Durang's "Guilty Pleasures" essay on that film before I saw it, and so I had trouble taking it seriously.)

 

I like "A Night to Remember." It focuses on the sinking of the ship. I learn what I need to know about the characters by how they react as the ship moves closer and closer to doom.

 

Curious coincidence. It came out in 1958 and is seen as the epitome of postwar British realism/documentary tradition. It was directed by Roy Baker, whose film career crashed and burned a few years later. Baker went into British TV, became known as Roy Ward Baker, and at the end of the Sixties got back into film directing horror movies for Hammer and Amicus: "The Vampire Lovers," "And Now the Screaming Starts." These are very good, very emotional and romantic, quite different from "A Night to Remember."

Link to post
Share on other sites

I t's been so long since I saw the Stanwyck/Webb version that I dimly recall it, I was also too young to realize the impact of what was happening, or that it was a true story. I will have to rent it to make a comparison. Regarding the Leo/Kate affair, that was simply the 'glue' to mold the actual events around. I agree with whoever said Kathy Bates as Molly Brown was so good, much better than the lady in Night . . . I think Camerons version portrayed a visual impact in what the ship looked like, what life aboard was like (for both first class and steerage), what de-boarding was like, and watching the ship sink with all those people being drowned and the lifeboat people being so totally helpless. I believe an experience such as a survivor of the Titanic could easily urge a person to LIVE as the photos at her bedside showed Rose did. When watching a true documentary, I prefer just the facts, but with a fictionalized version of a documentary, I want to care about the people involved. I apologize for running on too long.

Link to post
Share on other sites

"It was directed by Roy Baker, whose film career crashed and burned a few years later. Baker went into British TV, became known as Roy Ward Baker, and at the end of the Sixties got back into film directing horror movies for Hammer and Amicus: "The Vampire Lovers," "And Now the Screaming Starts." These are very good, very emotional and romantic, quite different from "A Night to Remember.""

 

 

I don't think it was so much that Baker's career "crashed and burned" so much as the entire British film industry "crashed and burned." Basically, if a British director didn't go international (like Lean, Asquith, Reed, etc.), he had to go into TV or work for a small indie studio like Hammer. Personally, I think that some of Baker's work for Hammer is just as good in its own way as NIGHT TO REMEMBER, especially the sci-fi movie QUATERMASS AND THE PIT. (Even THE ANNIVERSARY and LEGEND OF 7 GOLDEN VAMPIRES are fun in the campy Hammer way.)

 

BTW, I definitely prefer NIGHT TO REMEMBER over all other versions of the Titanic story. I find it more emotionally satisfying to know that the stories we're watching were true. And of course, it benefits from the fine craftsmanship that typified British filmmaking of the 1940s and 1950s. Its understatement is sheer genius in comparison to the overblown qualities of Cameron's version.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jean Negulesco's Titanic (1953): 5 Stars. Fine, highly watchable performances by Clifton Webb, Barbara Stanwyck, Thelma Ritter and Brian Aherne and wonderful use of atmospheric b & w cinematography & sound. A highly enjoyable and ultimately moving show. Not particularly factually accurate, but gripping.

 

A Night to Remember (1957): 5 Stars. Excellent, stoic semi-documentary approach focusing on events more than just character-driven, but with the humanity anchored by such fine actors as Kenneth More & Laurence Naismith. Quite accurate historically and very well told.

 

James Cameron's Titanic (1997): zzzzzzzzz. I've literally tried to watch this about 4 times and I invariably fall asleep. Something about it just seems so contrived. I recognize the technical achievement, of course, but it just doesn't grip me like the others still do, after repeated exposure to them.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Although I find merit in all 3 films about that horrible night in 1912, I most prefer the spectacular 1997 "Titanic".

The grandeur of the ship is fabulous, and the finale is breathtaking, especially the majestic ship breaking in half (a fact not known in the other 2 films).

Outstanding filmmaking.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I must admit I've never met a Titanic film I've liked. I'm not going so far as to disagree with the quality of fimmaking or acting in A Night To Remember, but it's a rare occasion when I go for an historical drama.

 

I also side with Quiller's appreciation of director, Roy Baker's, work with Hammer Film Productions. It's seriously undervalued. His and Terence Fisher's work became the hallmark of horror after the glory days of Universal. If not for Hammer there'd be no Rosemary's Baby or Exorcist.

(Here's a bit of trivia: Can anyone connect Norma Shearer with Rosemary's Baby?)

Link to post
Share on other sites

> A Night to Remember (1957): 5 Stars.

> Excellent, stoic semi-documentary approach focusing

> on events more than just character-driven, but with

> the humanity anchored by such fine actors as Kenneth

> More & Laurence Naismith. Quite accurate historically

> and very well told.

>

> James Cameron's Titanic (1997): zzzzzzzzz.

> I've literally tried to watch this about 4 times and

> I invariably fall asleep. Something about it just

> seems so contrived. I recognize the technical

> achievement, of course, but it just doesn't grip me

> like the others still do, after repeated exposure to

> them.

 

Really? I rate them just the opposite. I think A Night To Remember was a snoozefest, it was sooooooooooooooo dry. It was like being in history class again, and I hated history. I don't know how you could be bored by Titanic, so many interesting stories going on.

Link to post
Share on other sites

To each his own, I guess, Brad. I admit that I'm a lifelong Anglophile, which probably helped my enjoyment of A Night to Remember. I suspect that alot of our interesting, and often puzzling likes and dislikes hinge on when we saw something as well. On tv, I saw the 1953 Titanic movie as a little kid, and A Night... as a teen, and so, I guess I was imprinted, so to speak, early on by those films. I do like many current movies, though Cameron's work has always left me cold. Hey, thank goodness for variety, eh? I enjoy reading your posts, and hope that you & heidigunn will hang in there, and continue bringing your ideas to the mix.

;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

~heidigunn~

 

Have only seen both but once.

 

My recollection of Titanic is that I found it entertaining and heartbreaking, but that I was also wishing that a better actor had been cast in the lead male role.

 

One scene that is imprinted on my mind is one of an elder couple spooning on a bed as the ice cold sea fills up just below them before it will claim them.

 

That fleeting moment of two longtime companions surrendering not to panic but to the sad inevitable, embracing one another, pressing their love into the abyss was quite a brilliant image.

 

My recollection of A Night To Remember, which is more recent, is that I also found it entertaining and heartbreaking, but in a far less sensational way, which I ultimately find more appealing in a final comparison.

 

I think that for me to say for certain, either way, I would do with a back-to-back viewing.

 

But any conclusion of comparison I might render would definitely be nothing as extreme as an either/or contrast - I think they are both very worthwhile films.

 

S A M

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ms Moirafinnie: Thank you for the compliment. Although I know Mr. Cameron has done a lot of work, the only two I am really familiar with are Titanic and the Abyss. I think he was also involved in one of the Terminator movies. In any case, much of my enjoyment of historic films comes from seeing costumes, furnishing, and implements used in the course of the story. I was immediately engrossed by Titanic when I saw the cars being unloaded with items to be put on the ship. Everything from trunks, to toys, and even an automobile. I have quite a wide range of interests as is shown in my home by my rather embarrassing knick-knack collections such as angels, lighthouses, and horses My favorite spare time jaunts are museums, and old planatations, so, I suppose my admiration for Titanic is grounded in that.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> >(Here's a bit of trivia: Can anyone connect Norma

> > Shearer with Rosemary's Baby?)[/i]

>

> Robert Evans? That's all I got.

 

and that's all you needed. Bingo! Shearer "discovered" Evans, who produced R's Baby. Wow, D.W. Griffith to David Caruso in 3 depressing steps.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Being a huge fan of the Titanic I like all three for different reasons.

 

Cameron's version for the special effects.

 

A Night To Remember for it's historical accuracy.

 

Titanic for Barbara Stanwyck and a very good cast / production (though it's not shown very often).

 

I'd have to say A Night To Remember would rate first, with Titanic second and Cameron's version third.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> Being a huge fan of the Titanic I like all three for

> different reasons.

>

> Cameron's version for the special effects.

>

> A Night To Remember for it's historical accuracy.

>

> Titanic for Barbara Stanwyck and a very good cast /

> production (though it's not shown very often).

>

> I'd have to say A Night To Remember would rate first,

> with Titanic second and Cameron's version third.

 

I totally agree with your ratings.

Link to post
Share on other sites

People always criticize the 1953 version because of the focus on relationships, as if that means it's not 'factual' enough. Sure, the relationships were fictionalized, but certainly there must have been similar relationships on that ship when it went down. The story brings a very important human element into the film which enables us to connect with the tragedy of the event. The whole production was beautiful. Stanwyck and Webb were teriffic. It won an Oscar for best screenplay.

 

I really can not watch the James Cameron version. It is just so trite and manipulative. The special effects are much too obviously digitalized. Notice that there is no dirt anywhere.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...