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Do You Know Me?


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Thanks. I was a comic violinist in vaudeville where I made friends with two brothers who were part of a comedy act working with a "top banana". They asked me to join the act. The boss said he'd pay me $90 per week, or $100 per week if I'd forget that fiddle. I said "For $100, I'd forget everything". After a few years, we had a movie contract at MGM. We appeared with some of the biggest stars in Hollywood. The boss wouldn't pay us what we thought we were worth, so we went out on our own to another studio where we worked for many years. One of the brothers left the act and was replaced by another brother. He eventually passed away and two more replacements followed. When our old films were shown on television, our career was revived. We now had a whole new generation of fans. Do you know me? I'll give you another clue. My nickname was "Porcupine".

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Yes, I am Larry Fine. The "top banana" was Ted Healy. In the late fifties, Columbia stopped making short films and they sold our old films to television syndication. There was even a set of bubble gum cards with pictures from our old films, and promoting our feature film "Have Rocket Will Travel". We stayed active in features and personal appearances for about 8 more years. It was said that my face was calloused from all the times that Moe slapped me. It was a tough way to make a living. Your turn, finance.

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I was a darkly handsome male model before entering films in the mid-'30s. I played romantic leads and villains mostly in routine films. My best-known starring role may have been in a mid-'40s noir which also featured an actor who has recently been extensively discussed on these boards.. I died at a relatively young age after an operation.

 

Edited by: finance on Sep 29, 2010 3:29 PM

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Thanks.

 

?Being the son of actors, I was encouraged into the business and I acted on the stage before my work in movies. I was very prolific as a child actor in a few weepers and a few rowdy ones, too, which lead me to some work in a very short on-going series, where I played a guy always managing to be duped into helping and getting nothing heartache in return, and brushs with the law. My most famous work is from a cult 1950s show, of which I still got fan mail in my later years. I even wanted to be buried in my costume from the tv show. I smile when I look back on those days, but I never missed any part of acting. I was very fortunate for everything and was glad when I left.?

 

?Do you know me??

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I was born in Brooklyn, and I was on Broadway from the age of 17. I became one of Broadway's most celebrated performers. I received one NY Drama Critics' Best Actress award. My screen appearances were sporadic but memorable, often in films starring my husband, who was better known than I.

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Thanks. Do you know me? I was a very accomplished horseman at a very early age. I worked in a rodeo owned by Hoot Gibson. He used his Hollywood connections to get me started in movies. At first, I played bit parts and often I played the star as a boy. I was in some top movies and a lot of "B" pictures. I did a few "Our Gang" comedies and I even did the voice of a memorable character in an animated movie. I served in World War II, at least in the latter part of the war. After the war, my riding ability, and the fact that I could do my own stunts, got me noticed in westerns again, and I worked a lot with one of the leading western stars of the day. When he went into TV, I appeared often on his show. He got me the part of a sidekick in another western series with another former stunt man, and eventually I got a series of my own. Later, I did some guest spots on other TV shows. I retired from acting in the sixties and went into business. I was not yet forty years old. Do you know me?

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Yes, I am Dickie, or Dick Jones. I was in "Stella Dallas" in 1937 and "Mr. Smith Goes To Washington" in 1938. In 1940, I did the voice of Pinocchio in the Disney classic. I worked extensively with Gene Autry in the late forties and early fifties in both theatrical movies and Gene's TV series. He put me in "The Range Rider" as Dick West, sidekick to the Range Rider, played by Jack, later Jock, Mahoney. We both did most of our own stunts. Later, I starred in "Buffalo Bill Jr.", also for Gene's production company. Good Job, Lana. Your turn, now. Oh, by the way, do you remember who sponsored "The Range Rider"?

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Ok, Miles, here's what I found:

 

In the fall of 1952 ?The Range Rider? TV series began in syndication. It appeared originally on CBS sponsored by Table Talk pies.. Anyway, the Range Rider was sponsored by Table Talk pies, those kind that your mother could put in your lunchbox. They had fruit fillings and an awful lot of crust. They work great in school cafeteria food fights. Anyway, Jock Mahoney would come on after the show to do the commercial and he would say something like "Have Mom pick up several flavors the next time she goes shopping, and don't forget to save the lemon for Dad."... Mahoney later told the story of how he was stopped on the street one day by a guy who said how much his kids liked the show and complimented Mahoney. Jocko smiled and then the guy said, "but that part about saving the lemon pie for Dad. I actually liked the other flavors. I can't stand the lemon pie...

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Thanks.

 

?I was always known and typecast as a villain in my early years as an actor until one fateful movie, where everything changed and I was the good guy and avenger, the man on the right side. No one wanted me as a villain after that. When someone once asked me, how many times I would reprise my life-changing role in the movies, I said I stop at 22. I had originally been opposed to WWII as a conscientious objector. Then, one day, I changed my mind and joined the British Air Force. I was shot down and was captured and kept on a concentration camp. As fate would have it, I would be in a war movie similar to what I experienced. I tried to help the director with fine points in the movie, but he wouldn?t listen until someone told him I knew what I was talking about. I really loved acting. But also, having five daughters means you have to make money. They are expensive, you know. So I worked and became one of the most recognizable actors in the movies and on the stage, being Tony-nominated four times.?

 

?Do you know me??

 

Edited by: allaboutlana on Oct 5, 2010 10:06 AM

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