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Do You Know Me?


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AAAAHHHHHHH! How about Austin Pendleton?

 

He played Santa in "Christmas with the Kranks".

"Hamlet" - in the 15 Minute Hamlet.

 

I know him more for his stage work and "What's Up Doc?".

It must have been an honor to be the original "Model the Tailor" in Fiddler on the Roof with Zero Mostel.

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You are:

 

Beulah Bondi.

 

She portrayed the wife of Andrew Jackson, in "The Gorgeous Hussy" (1936). She played a preacher's wife in "Rain" (1932). She was James Stewart's mother in four different productions, most notably "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" (1939) and "It's a Wonderful Life" (1946).

 

Beulah won the Emmy award for her role in "The Waltons," which is where she played an aunt. She was nominated twice for the Oscar, but didn't win.

 

Even if this turns out NOT to be the person you have in mind, you gotta admit, it fits all your clues.

 

Dan N.

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I had a long career working in theater, film, and television. I worked with Fred Astaire, Barbara Stanwyck, and Alfred Hitchcock. Who am I?

 

 

Not sure, but I think you may have to give more hints. It looks as if the slender clue you've given could apply to a lot of people.

 

I chose Joan Fontaine. She worked with Astaire in "A Damsel in Distress" (1937), with Hitchcock in "Rebecca" (1940) and "Suspicion" (1941), and the IMDb shows Fontaine as a co-presenter at the 50th Academy Awards, along with Barbara Stanwyck.

 

Dan N.

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Nope, not Joan Fontaine. Co-presenting in an Award Show will not figure into the picture. I was a supporting player mostly working at one studio. I also was part of a long running televison series later in my life.

 

 

Then you are: Jack Carson.

 

Carson appeared in Hitchcock's "Mr. and Mrs. Smith" (1941); he appeared with Fred Astaire in "Carefree" (1938); and he was in "Hollywood Canteen" (1944), which also featured Barbara Stanwyck.

 

You say you were "a supporting player mostly working at one studio." That studio was Warner Bros.

 

You also say you were "part of a long running television series." The phrase "part of" is hard to pin down, but you made appearances in several such series, among them

 

"Disneyland" (2 episodes)

"Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (one episode)

"Bonanza" (one episode), and

"Alcoa Theater" (2 episodes).

 

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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Not who I was thinking of. I guess the question isn't the best since there's more than one person fitting the descritpion. You are certainly the master of the question asking. Hopefully, I'll get better at this. Just the same, here's another clue.

 

One of the people that I mentioned I worked with, I worked with on Television, the other two in the movies. Another clue: I had a famous father (in his day).

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Okay, then you're Keenan Wynn. Your father was Ed Wynn, famous in his day as a master comedian, sometimes under the sobriquet "The Perfect Fool."

 

You were in five Fred Astaire films, probably the most famous being "Royal Wedding" (1951). You worked with Barbara Stanwyck in "B.F.'s Daughter" (1948).

 

Now comes the television part. You appeared in an episode of "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" in 1955.

 

You appeared as a supporting actor throughout the 1940s and '50s, mostly for MGM. And you were "part of" several long-running TV series, including "Dallas."

 

And if you're NOT Keenan Wynn... please tell your friend PFriedman to give us more comprehensive clues to your identity, will ya?

 

Cheers,

Dan N.

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Thanks, PFriedman. You're a gent.

 

Do You Know Me?

 

New Jersey-born, I have only rarely been a star in films. But producers seem to want me for their projects, because I have the sort of screen presence that is hard to forget. So far, I have appeared in more than 40 films... and I'm still fairly young.

 

The 1990s were especially good to me, establishing me as a strong villainous type in several films. In real life, I have had to battle demons that were every bit as evil as the losers I usually portray on screen.

 

Who am I?

 

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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